Communication - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Animal Sciences

Janet Fitch
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Communication.
This section contains 1,391 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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The world is full of sights, sounds, and smells that organisms use to communicate with each other. Because humans are diurnal (active during the day) and have well-developed eyes and ears, we tend to think of communication in terms of vision and acoustics. However, other animals, plants, fungi, and even microorganisms can communicate, and do so using a variety of different methods. Communication is defined as any signal from one organism that influences the behavior of another organism. The type of signaling an organism uses depends on the reception abilities of the receiver. Nocturnal animals use sound and smells to communicate with each other, flowers attract pollinators by smell and sight, microorganisms communicate through touch and chemicals, and aquatic organisms can use electricity.

Communication between different individuals enhances the chances of survival by the sender. The sender may successfully defend a territory, thus ensuring a food supply, or...

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This section contains 1,391 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Communication Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Communication from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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