Civil Liberties, World War II - Research Article from Americans at War

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Civil Liberties, World War II

The federal government, in response to periods of insecurity and conflict, sometimes restricts civil liberties in an effort to maintain national security. U.S. involvement in World War I brought about such restrictions, and World War II proved to be no different. In the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the federal government took into custody almost 11,000 persons it considered enemy aliens. The arrest of the 8,000 Japanese Americans, 2,300 German Americans, and several hundred Italian Americans followed due process of law. However, on February 19, 1942, presidential action targeted one specific group for detainment. Executive Order 9066 provided the initial authority for the roundup and internment of approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans, including those who were American citizens. Congress later passed legislation to enforce the order. The Japanese Americans affected by the mandate, primarily those living on the West Coast, were divided and sent to...

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This section contains 811 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Civil Liberties, World War II Encyclopedia Article
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Civil Liberties, World War II from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.