Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance.
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The Birth of a Science

Charles Darwin first conceived the idea of hereditary units when he published his theory of pangenesis in 1868. In this model, circulating units called gemmules are accumulated in the gonads and transmitted to the off-spring. This theory was discredited by experimental tests performed by Francis Galton in the 1870s. Galton used blood transfusions in rabbits to show that the alleged gemmules in one rabbit's blood did not alter the heredity of the recipient rabbit's blood. In the 1890s Hugo de Vries took the term "pangenesis" and trimmed it to "pangene" for the assumed units of inheritance. He argued that pangenes remained inside the cell and did not migrate. It was this theory of intracellular pangenesis that led de Vries to independently find what Gregor Mendel had discovered thirty years earlier in his work with contrasting traits in garden peas—there are...

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This section contains 1,166 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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