Camp Followers: War and Women - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Camp Followers.
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Women at War

During the course of a war, women slipped in and out of the different forms of camp following. A wife might take a paid position and then, if she was widowed, stay with the army. The army subjected all who traveled with them to special regulations, military discipline, and military courts. At times the army subjected women to embarrassing medical examinations for venereal disease.

Whereas the British simply accepted that an army would have camp followers and regulated the numbers who accompanied troops to America, American leaders were ambivalent about women camp followers. Washington thought they made the army look disorderly on march and slowed marches, but he also knew their presence kept men from deserting. As the war progressed, American commanders began enrolling women and children and issuing them partial rations. Officials who were struggling to keep troops from going hungry...

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This section contains 1,776 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Camp Followers: War and Women Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Camp Followers: War and Women from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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