Bradwardine, Thomas (C. 1300-1349) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4┬ápages of information about Bradwardine, Thomas (C. 1300–1349).
This section contains 857 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Bradwardine, Thomas (C. 1300-1349) Encyclopedia Article

Thomas Bradwardine studied arts at Balliol College and theology at Merton College, Oxford. In September 1337, he was appointed chancellor of Saint Paul's in London. From 1346 to 1348, as a king's clerk, he enjoyed a prominent position in the household of Edward III. In June 1349 he was elected archbishop of Canterbury; soon afterwards, in October, he died of the Black Death.

Like many Mertonians, Bradwardine was a logician and a mathematician. He wrote a treatise De insolubilibus (an insolubile is a self-referential sentence, such as the "liar paradox"), a Geometria speculativa, and a treatise De continuo. In his Tractatus de proportionibus velocitatum in motibus (1328) he attempted to introduce mathematic functions into Aristotelician physics. His masterpiece, however, is a voluminous theological and philosophical work, De causa Dei contra Pelagium, divided into three books (1344). It originates from lectures he had given in Oxford and London and...

(read more)

This section contains 857 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Bradwardine, Thomas (C. 1300-1349) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan
Bradwardine, Thomas (C. 1300-1349) from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.