Blake, William (1757-1827) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

James Daugherty
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5┬ápages of information about Blake, William (1757–1827).
This section contains 1,219 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Blake, William (1757-1827) Encyclopedia Article

Thought

Imagination

According to Blake, man is a working or constructing imagination—the creative artist is normative man. In this context there is no difference between human essence and human existence, for the imagination is the human existence itself and is also essential human nature. Works of art are neither intellectual nor emotional, motivated neither by desire nor by reason, neither free nor compelled: all such antitheses become unities in them. Even more important, the imagination destroys the antithesis of subject and object. Man starts out as an isolated intelligence in an alien nature, but the imagination creates a world in its own image, the world of cities and gardens and human communities and domesticated animals.

Interpretation of the Bible

For Blake, the Bible is a definitive parable of human existence, as it tells how man finds himself in an unsatisfactory world and tries to build...

(read more)

This section contains 1,219 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Blake, William (1757-1827) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Blake, William (1757-1827) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook