Black American and Japanese American Experiences on the Home Front - Research Article from American Homefront in WWII

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 32 pages of information about Black American and Japanese American Experiences on the Home Front.
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Black American and Japanese American Experiences on the Home Front

Turner Catledge …150

Alexander J. Allen …159

Mine Okubo …166

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Americans who had lived through the experience of World War II (1939–45) still recalled the overwhelming unity and patriotism exhibited on the home front. After the Japanese attacked the U.S. military base at Pearl Harbor, almost all Americans fully supported the fight against the Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan. Yet for some, this home front spirit was flawed with contradictions, even hypocrisy: The United States joined the war to protect freedom and democracy overseas, but freedoms on the home front were severely limited for people of color. Black Americans, who made up 10 percent of the U.S. population, faced strong racial prejudice and discrimination in almost every part of daily...

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This section contains 1,086 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Black American and Japanese American Experiences on the Home Front Encyclopedia Article
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Black American and Japanese American Experiences on the Home Front from UXL. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.