Berkeley, George (1685-1753) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 34┬ápages of information about Berkeley, George (1685–1753).
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Main Themes of Berkeley's Philosophy

Criticism of Contemporary Science

The above account of Berkeley's writings emphasizes their apologetic intent, an intent that can be seen in the subtitles of his major writings—that of the Principles is typical: Wherein the chief causes of error and difficulty in the sciences, with the grounds of scepticism, atheism and irreligion, are inquired into. It will be seen that "the chief causes of difficulty in the sciences" are also prominent. Berkeley considered that in the mathematics and natural sciences of his day insufficient attention was given to what experience reveals to us. Apart from Newton, the mathematicians were, he wrote in the Philosophical Commentaries, "mere triflers, mere Nihilarians." For example, they conceived of lines as infinitely divisible, but this is not only absurd, it could be maintained only by men who "despised sense." Thus Berkeley regarded himself as protesting against...

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This section contains 10,167 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Berkeley, George (1685-1753) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Berkeley, George (1685-1753) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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