Augustine - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Augustine.
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Augustine (354–430), born in Thagaste, North Africa, November 13, synthesized Platonism with Christian theology, and is considered a doctor of the European church. He taught rhetoric in Carthage, Rome, and Milan, until his conversion (386) and entry into monastic life; he became a presbyter (391) and bishop of Hippo (396), now Annaba, Algeria. Representative of the implications of his thought for science, technology, and ethics is the fact that in his early years he took an interest in one of the sciences of his day, astrology, and may even have practiced it himself; later he argued decisively against it. Augustine died in Hippo on August 28.

For Augustine, the chief concern of human beings ought to be God and the soul. This did not imply indifference to the material world and its events. When human beings perceive order in nature, he said, it points toward the realm of true happiness, the intelligible realm of...

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This section contains 1,200 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Augustine Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Augustine from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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