Asian Indian, Korean, and Southeast Asian Immigration - Research Article from U.S. Immigration and Migration Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 37 pages of information about Asian Indian, Korean, and Southeast Asian Immigration.
This section contains 10,983 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
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Asian Indian, Korean, and Southeast Asian Immigration

By the late 1950s and early 1960s, U.S. immigration policy was becoming increasingly incompatible with the changing attitudes toward race at home and the country's reputation as a leader abroad. Urged by Presidents John F. Kennedy (1917–1963; served 1961–63) and Lyndon B. Johnson (1908–1973; served 1963–69), Congress enacted a wide-ranging immigration policy reform. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, also known as the Hart-Celler Act, abolished the national origins quota system and ended discriminatory policies against immigration from Asian nations. It raised the total number of people allowed to immigrate each year to 290,000, with 170,000 visas (documents allowing a person to legally enter the country) available altogether for countries in the Eastern Hemisphere and no limit for any one country. Applicants were to be approved on a first-come, first-served basis. The...

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This section contains 10,983 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Asian Indian, Korean, and Southeast Asian Immigration Encyclopedia Article
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U.S. Immigration and Migration Reference Library
Asian Indian, Korean, and Southeast Asian Immigration from U.S. Immigration and Migration Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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