Antibiotic Resistance - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Antibiotic Resistance.
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Mechanisms of Resistance

Antibiotics, whether made in the laboratory or in nature by other microbes, are designed to hinder metabolic processes such as cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis, or transcription, among others. If humans are to prosper against microbial disease, it is necessary to understand how and why bacteria are able to mount their clever defenses. Aided with the knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of resistance, scientists can discover new ways to combat the resistant bacteria.

The phenomenon of antibiotic resistance in some cases is innate to the microbe. For instance, penicillin directly interferes with the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. Therefore, it is useless against many other microbes such as fungi, viruses, wall-less bacteria like Mycoplasma (which causes "walking pneumonia"), and even many Gram negative bacteria whose outer membrane prevents penicillin from penetrating them. Other bacteria change their "genetic programs," which allows them to circumvent the...

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This section contains 985 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Antibiotic Resistance Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Antibiotic Resistance from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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