Alexander of Hales (C. 1185-1245) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7┬ápages of information about Alexander of Hales (C. 1185–1245).
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Teachings

Alexander's own doctrines are found in his Glossa and Disputed Questions (which are divided in the British Museum manuscript Royal 9. E. 14. into two series: those written before and those written after he became a friar); the Summa ascribed to him does not necessarily represent his opinions. Both the Gloss and the Questions labor under the disadvantage of being students' reportations (although some copies seem to have had a kind of official approval); both, however, justify the encomium of Bernard of Bessa: maximus in theologia et philosophia magister (greatest master in theology and philosophy). Alexander is both theologian and philosopher, masterfully handling a wide range of questions. Undoubtedly a traditionalist whose prime sources are Augustine, John of Damascus, and Pseudo-Dionysius, and whose thought is close to the scholastic traditions of his predecessors, Alexander nonetheless surpasses his contemporaries in the breadth and profundity of his questions...

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This section contains 2,029 words
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Buy the Alexander of Hales (C. 1185-1245) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Alexander of Hales (C. 1185-1245) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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