Alcott, Louisa May - Research Article from Feminism in Literature

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 78 pages of information about Alcott, Louisa May.
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Louisa May Alcott: Introduction

Alcott's stories of nineteenth-century domestic life include what is widely known as the quintessential women's novel: Little Women; or, Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy (1868). Her novels detailing the lives of Jo, Meg, Amy, Beth, their children, and their careers have remained popular for over a century, though many observers consider them the exclusive province of female readers. During her lifetime, Alcott spoke publicly on feminist causes, including suffrage, equal pay, and women's right to education. As a prolific professional author she also set an important precedent, demonstrating the viability of fiction writing as a career for women.

Biographical Information

The second of four daughters, Alcott was born November 29, 1832 in Germantown, Pennsylvania, and lived most of her life in Concord, Massachusetts. Both of her parents strongly influenced her education and the development of her social and political views...

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This section contains 1,460 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Alcott, Louisa May Encyclopedia Article
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Alcott, Louisa May from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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