Agricultural Mobilization - Research Article from American Homefront in WWII

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about Agricultural Mobilization.
This section contains 5,436 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Agricultural Mobilization Encyclopedia Article

Sharp Rise in Demand

By 1941, as Europe's agricultural production became increasingly disrupted by the war, the demand for U.S. agricultural products began to rise sharply. On March 11, 1941, the Lend-Lease Act became law. The act authorized President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945; served 1933–45) to lend money and send weapons, equipment, and food to the Allies, the nations combating the so-called Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan. Under the Lend-Lease program, U.S. goods worth billions of dollars flowed to Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and China. Suddenly the American agricultural industry had to scramble to keep up with the food demands of the Allied countries.

With the commencement of the Lend-Lease program and the formal entrance of the United States into the war in late 1941, American farmers were expected to produce enough food for U.S. civilians, the U.S. Army and Navy, and Allied civilians and...

(read more)

This section contains 5,436 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Agricultural Mobilization Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
American Homefront in WWII
Agricultural Mobilization from American Homefront in WWII. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook