African Americans, World War II - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about African Americans, World War II.
This section contains 1,119 words
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The Quest for Equality

The Great Migration of blacks, during the World War I era, from the South to the North and Midwest began a national demographic transformation. The process resumed with vigor in the 1940s as black Southerners flocked to the industrial centers of the North, Midwest, and far West. The build-up for war created new opportunities for blacks in expanding industries, where blacks earned higher wages than in farming or domestic service.

As America prepared for war, longtime labor organizer A. Phillip Randolph joined with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the National Urban League to pressure the White House to desegregate the military and defense industries. After an unsuccessful meeting with the president, Randolph and other grassroots activists planned a protest against racial discrimination for June 1941 to be held at the Lincoln Memorial. To avoid the embarrassment...

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This section contains 1,119 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the African Americans, World War II Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
African Americans, World War II from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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