Adams, Hannah - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

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Adams, Hannah

ADAMS, HANNAH. Well known in New England during her lifetime, Hannah Adams (1755–1831) has been remembered, if at all, as the first American-born woman to earn her living by writing. However, she also has a preeminent place in the history of the study of religion. Adams wrote three theological and didactic books: The Truth and Excellence of the Christian Religion Exhibited (1804), which offered biographical sketches of "eminent" lay Christians; Concise Account of the London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst the Jews (1816), which exhorted Americans to evangelize the "lost sheep of the house of Israel"; and Letters on the Gospels (1824), which aimed to help young people "read the New Testament with more pleasure and advantage." As these texts indicate, Adams shared a great deal with other theological liberals during the Early National period. A Congregationalist who sided with the Unitarians, Adams...

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This section contains 1,357 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Adams, Hannah Encyclopedia Article
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Adams, Hannah from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.