Abortion - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Abortion.
This section contains 2,356 words
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Abortion

The claims to which partisans on both sides of the "abortion" issue appeal seem, if one is not thinking of the abortion issue, close to self-evident, or they appear to be easily defensible. The case against abortion (Beckwith 1993) rests on the proposition that there is a very strong presumption that ending another human life is seriously wrong. Almost everyone who is not thinking about the abortion issue would agree. There are good arguments for the view that fetuses are both living and human. ("Fetus" is generally used in the philosophical literature on abortion to refer to a human organism from the time of conception to the time of birth.) Thus, it is easy for those opposed to abortion to think that only the morally depraved or the seriously confused could disagree with them.

Standard pro-choice views appeal either to the proposition that women have the right to make...

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This section contains 2,356 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Abortion Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Abortion from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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