1960s: Commerce - Research Article from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 14 pages of information about 1960s.
This section contains 285 words
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1960s: Commerce

Until the 1990s, the 1960s marked the longest uninterrupted period of American economic expansion. The American economy was the largest in the world. Its giant corporations, such as General Motors, IBM, Procter & Gamble, and Coca-Cola extended their influence and dominance to every corner of the globe. American companies grew ever larger during the decade. In 1962, the five largest industrial companies accounted for 12 percent of American manufacturing assets. The largest five hundred companies controlled 66 percent of such assets. Big business dominated the American economic landscape.

Individual Americans did very well during the decade, too. By the end of the decade, the average American's real income had increased 50 percent since 1950, giving Americans a standard of living that was envied throughout the world. Median family income rose from $8,540 in 1963 to $10,770 by 1969. Americans used their growing discretionary income (income not needed for basic necessities) on a growing number...

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This section contains 285 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the 1960s: Commerce Encyclopedia Article
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Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms
1960s: Commerce from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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