1960s: an Era of Pessimism and Activism - Research Article from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about 1960s.
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While the 1950s are stereotyped—sometimes unfairly—as a decade of quiet optimism, prosperity, and social conformity, the 1960s are often stereotyped—rather accurately—as a decade of turbulence, political activism, and growing discontent. During the course of the decade, the American military became increasingly involved in the war in Vietnam (1954–75), sparking massive protests at home. The assassination of four important American leaders, including President John F. Kennedy (1917–1963), raised fears that the United States was no longer a peaceful nation. Organized protests by women, African Americans, homosexuals, and antiwar activists challenged the American social structure.

The 1960s began with a wave of optimism as Americans elected U.S. senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts to the presidency. Kennedy was the youngest person and the first Catholic elected to the nation's highest office. He encouraged Americans to "Ask...

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This section contains 1,067 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the 1960s: an Era of Pessimism and Activism Encyclopedia Article
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Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms
1960s: an Era of Pessimism and Activism from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.