1900s: the Way We Lived - Research Article from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms

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Chautauqua Movement

In the years between the 1870s and the 1920s, the name Chautauqua came to be synonymous with culture, learning, entertainment, and social activism. Originating at a New York religious institute, the Chautauqua movement—which focused on self-improvement through education—spread across small-town America. Even today, that spirit of lifelong education lives on at the Chautauqua Institution.

In 1873, in the little town of Chautauqua, New York, two Methodist ministers, John Heyl Vincent (1832–1920) and Lewis Miller (1829–1899), developed a unique program of study that combined various nonreligious educational subjects with typical Sunday school topics. By 1874, their idea had become reality and the Chautauqua Institution offered a nine-week summer session of adult education courses. As the word spread, more and more people were drawn to the unusual school. They studied politics, culture, literature, and science, and attended lectures and performances from the most famous people of...

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This section contains 412 words
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Buy the 1900s: the Way We Lived Encyclopedia Article
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1900s: the Way We Lived from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.