1900s: Print Culture - Research Article from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 16 pages of information about 1900s.
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1900s: Print Culture

In an age before radio and television claimed the attention of Americans, reading was one of the most popular leisure-time activities. American writers and publishers churned out a variety of reading material to suit the tastes of every reader, from comic strips to magazines to dime novels to classics.

The comic strip was created just before the turn of the century when Richard Outcault (1863–1928) created a character known as the Yellow Kid in a series known as Hogan's Alley. Later strips such as The Katzenjammer Kids and Mutt & Jeff made such characteristics as word balloons, a distinctive cast of characters, and the use of a series of panels the common conventions of the comic strip. Still, by 1908 there were only five newspapers that ran daily comic strips.

Although magazines—collections of fiction and nonfiction often published on a weekly or a...

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This section contains 369 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the 1900s: Print Culture Encyclopedia Article
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Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms
1900s: Print Culture from Bowling, Beatniks, and Bell Bottoms. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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