Meetings with Remarkable Men

How does the author use foreshadowing in Meetings with Remarkable Men?

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In Chapter Two, we learn that due to the political upheavals that went on before and during World War I, Gurdjieff never had a chance to visit his father's grave. They had last been together when his father was eighty-two years old. Most of the memorable things from his father, including gramophone recordings of songs and stories, had been lost in Russia during the Bolshevik Revolution. As an understandable result, Gurdjieff has nothing bad to say about his father other than the one fault of being too honest for business. This suggests that Gurdjieff allows himself an amount of truth-stretching or taking advantage of human foolishness when dealing with other businessmen, and in this book the foreshadowing follows true to this characteristic of the author.

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Meetings with Remarkable Men