Babylon Revisited

How does F. Scott Fitzgerald use imagery in Babylon Revisited?

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Fitzgerald uses door imagery to represent a metaphorical entrance way to Charlie's hopeful new future with Honoria. The very first door encountered in the story, in fact, opens to reveal "a lovely little girl of nine" - Honoria - who shrieks with joy as she leaps into Charlie's arms. The door as symbol of Charlie's possible future with Honoria is then repeated the morning after Charlie learns that Marion will consent to his regaining custody of his daughter: "He woke up feeling happy. The door of the world was open again."

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Babylon Revisited