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Book 3, Chapter 11 Notes from A Tale of Two Cities

This section contains 333 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)

A Tale of Two Cities Book 3, Chapter 11

After the verdict is read, Lucie begs to embrace her husband one last time; her wish is granted, and they hold each other tenderly for a few moments. She tells him their separation will break her heart and that she will pass soon, but that God will raise their daughter up as He did her. Dr. Manette begins to fall to his knees, and Darnay seizes him, exclaiming that the doctor did everything he could for him and that he thanks him with all his heart. Dr. Manette puts his hands in his hair and wrings them while letting out a shriek of anguish. Charles is taken away; Lucie looks at him radiantly, then turns to her father and lays her head on his breast. She tries to speak to him but instead falls at his feet. Carton then approaches and scoops her up. He takes her to a coach and delicately places her inside. Little Lucie begs Carton to do something to save her father; Carton embraces her, then puts her down gently. He asks if, before he leaves, he may kiss Lucie. He leans down and briefly kisses her, meanwhile murmuring something. (Little Lucie later reveals to her grandchildren that she heard him say, "A life you love.") He leaves the room and sees Dr. Manette and Mr. Lorry entering. Carton tells Dr. Manette that, as he had great influence just one day before, he should try to use it again. Dr. Manette expresses discouragement, but says that he will try and will not rest one moment. Dr. Manette adds that he is going to see the prosecutor and the president of the Tribunal, and that he should be back immediately after dark. Carton tells him he will go to Mr. Lorry's at nine to hear what Dr. Manette has been able to accomplish. Mr. Lorry follows Carton to the door and confides in him that he has no hope. Carton agrees that there is no real hope.

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