Tender is the Night Book Notes

Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Author/Context

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 24, 1896. His father, Edward, was from Maryland, with an allegiance to the Old South and its values. Fitzgerald's mother, Mary (Mollie) McQuillan, was the daughter of an Irish immigrant who became wealthy as a wholesale grocer in St. Paul. Both were Catholics.

Fitzgerald attended the St. Paul Academy; his first writing to appear in print was a detective story in the school newspaper when he was thirteen. He went to Princeton University, but quit in 1917.

In June 1918 Fitzgerald was assigned to Camp Sheridan, near Montgomery, Alabama. There, he fell in love with a celebrated belle, eighteen-year-old Zelda Sayre, the youngest daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court judge. The romance intensified Fitzgerald's hopes for the success of his novel, but after revision, Scribners rejected it for a second time. The war ended just before he was to be sent overseas. After his discharge, in 1919, he went to New York City to seek his fortune as he wished to marry. However, Zelda was unwilling to wait while Fitzgerald succeeded in the advertisement business and unwilling to live on his small salary and so broke their engagement.

In the fall of 1919 Fitzgerald started his career as a writer of stories for the mass-circulation magazines. Fitzgerald stopped doing this, as he wanted to work on his novels to write moneymaking popular fiction for the rest of his life. The publication of This Side of Paradise on March 26, 1920, made the twenty-four-year-old Fitzgerald famous almost overnight, and a week later, in New York, he married Zelda. They had an extravagant life as young celebrities. Fitzgerald tried to earn a solid literary reputation but his playboy image impeded the proper assessment of his work.

In 1932, Zelda had her first mental breakdown rapidly, and while a patient at John Hopkin's, she wrote Save Me the Waltz. Her autobiographical novel generated considerable bitterness between the Fitzgeralds, for he regarded it as pre-empting the material that he was using in his novel-in-progress. When it was published in 1934, his novel, Tender Is the Night, although the most ambitious of his works, was a commercial failure and led to his own breakdown. It was an almost autobiographical novel about Fitzgerald's life with Zelda, and described the deterioration of Dr. Dick Diver after falling in love with a mental patient.

After the failure of his novels, he wrote screenplays in Hollywood for a few years. With Zelda now confined to a mental hospital in North Carolina, he became involved with another woman, Sheila Graham. He died in her apartment of a heart attack, believing himself a failure.

Biography

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Tender Is the Night. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1995.

A Brief Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald. 14 June 2002.

F. Scott Fitzgerald Biography and Links to Etext at Owl-Eyes. 14 June 2002.

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald--Biography at Generation Terrorists. 14 June 2002.

Plot Summary

Rosemary met Nicole and Dr. Dick Diver on summer at the French Riviera. She fell in love with Dick. After spending some time at the Riviera with the Divers, the Norths, and her mother, she left her mother and traveled with the rest of the group to Paris. Here, she shopped with Nicole and enjoyed herself. Dick started to fall in love with her, and they all celebrated her eighteenth birthday. One night, when they returned to the hotel, Abe, who was supposed to have left Paris the day before, showed up drunk and said that Dick had to help him protect a Negro who had helped him identify the person who had stolen money from him. The Negro was in trouble because the other Negroes were angry with him. Feeling that Abe, Rosemary, and Dick wanted some privacy, the Negro went outside to wait in the corridor. Dick told Abe to go and freshen up, and to return later. When Rosemary returned to her room, she found the Negro laying dead on her bed. So that nobody would accuse Rosemary, Dick took his bed sheets and put them on Rosemary's bed, and took Rosemary's and asked his wife, Nicole, to clean them. After putting the body in a believable position on the floor in the corridor, Rosemary and Dick returned to the Diver's suite to find Nicole crying and rocking herself on the bathroom floor, holding the bloody sheets. She had drifted back into insanity. Rosemary returned to her mother.

Dick arrived in Zurich in 1917, at the age of 26, and was a neuropathologist. Nicole had been one of his patients, and was a schizophrenic as she was scared of men. Nicole and Dick fell in love, despite the fact that her sister, Beth, thought that Dick was marrying Nicole for her money, and that there was a big difference in social status between the two families. Beth was always concerned about Nicole's condition, and now, Franz, one of Dick's colleagues, suggested that he and Dick open up a clinic. Beth liked the idea since that would mean that Nicole would live near it. They used Nicole's money to finance it. After eighteen months at the clinic, Dick decided to leave the clinic. One day, upon returning home, there was a letter to Nicole saying that Dick had seduced one of his patients. Although this was not true, they had an argument and got into a car accident. After this, Dick told Nicole that he wanted to go to the Psychiatric Conference in Berlin, although he had no intention of doing this, but needed time away.

During his time away, Dick learned that Abe had died. Dick also started forming a drinking habit. He started falling in love with every girl he saw. During this time, his father died and so he went to America. Here, he saw Rosemary, whom he hadn't seen in four years, and they flirted some more with each other before finally sleeping together. Afterwards, they both realized that they weren't really in love. Dick then got drunk and got into a fight with a cab driver, and ended up at the police station where he punched a policeman. Beth was the one who had to get him out, and he felt ashamed.

When Dick returned, it was obvious that things between him and Nicole were over, and Nicole told him that she had feelings for Tommy Barban, one of their friends who Dick had never liked. Tommy said that he loved Nicole too. Dick spoke with Mary North and she said that everybody had loved him, but that his alcohol problem had caused him to lose many friends. Dick was glad that she was honest with him.

Major Characters

Dr. Dick Diver: An American psychologist who works in Zurich. Dick marries Nicole Warren, one of his mental patients. He is intelligent, and his work is the most important thing to him. He has an affair with Rosemary, and his marriage to Nicole starts to fail over time. Dick himself starts to fall apart both physically and emotionally, and he develops a drinking problem. At the end of the novel, Dick moves back to America and his condition starts to improve.

Nicole Warren Diver: Dr. Diver's strikingly beautiful mental patient (and then wife) originally from Chicago. Her family is very wealthy and she likes to travel all over Europe and live extravagantly. Nicole is always slipping back and forth between sanity and insanity. After her marriage to Dick fails, she marries Tommy Barban.

Rosemary Speers: Dick's younger lover. She is a beautiful actress who has many boyfriends. She tells Dick that he is the only one she has ever really loved. Dick thinks he loves her, but then realizes she is too immature for him.

Minor Characters

Luis Campion: A gentleman Rosemary met on the beach when she arrived in France.

Mrs. Abrams: A woman Rosemary met on the beach upon arriving in France.

Mrs. Violet McKisco: A woman Rosemary met on the beach when she arrived in France. Violet saw something horrendous while at the party at the Diver's; however, Tommy stopped her from telling anyone.

Mr. Dumphry: A gentleman Rosemary met at the beach in France.

Abe North: Mary's first husband and a good friend of Dick's who dies in a bar brawl. He causes much trouble throughout the story.

Mrs. Elsie Speers: Rosemary's mother. Rosemary admires her and listen to everything she ever says. She tells Dick that he is the only man Rosemary ever cared about.

Gausse: The owner of the hotel in Southern France, and a friend of the Divers.

Tommy Barban: A handsome, adventurous friend of Dick and Nicole's, who loves war. Nicole suspects that he loves her. He and Nicole have an affair and eventually marry.

Brady: The producer in the studio in France. Rosemary feels uncomfortable around him.

Mary North: Contessa di Minghetti -A wealthy and shallow friend of Dick and Nicole's.

Collis Clay: Initially a friend of Rosemary's, he also becomes well acquainted with Dick and Nicole. He is in love with Rosemary and tells Dick the story of Rosemary and Bill Hillis. He helps Dick get out of trouble in Rome.

Maria Wallis: An acquaintance of Nicole's who refuses to say hello to her and then shoots a man.

Laura: Maria's sister who lives in Paris.

Bill Hillis: A young gentleman who Rosemary was alone in a train compartment with, and who Dick becomes jealous of.

Mr. Crawshow: A Negro who comes to the hotel in Paris, looking for the Divers.

Mr. Freeman: This man was thrown in jail for no reason, according to Mr. Crawshow.

Mr. Jules Peterson: A Negro who helped Abe, he then is murdered for doing so.

Beth (Baby) Warren: Nicole's flighty and shallow older sister who desperately tries to find ways to cure Nicole's condition.

Mr. Devereux Warren: Nicole's wealthy father who lives in Chicago. He molested her after her mother died.

Franz Gregorovius: A pathologist in Zurich and a friend and colleague of Dick's. Franz admires Dick for his brilliance, and Dick admires Franz for his level-headedness. They open a clinic together in Zurich, but end their partnership due to Dick's alcoholism and degenerated state.

Dr. Dohmler: The head doctor of the clinic in Zurich where Franz and Dick first work together.

Lanier Diver: Dick and Nicole's curious son. He is two years older than his younger sister, Topsy.

Topsy Diver: Dick and Nicole's daughter who has Nicole's fair looks.

Lady Caroline (Sibly-Biers): A stuck up friend of Mary North's and an acquaintance of Dick and Nicole's.

Mr. McKisco: A novelist Rosemary met at the beach in France. In defending his wife's honor, he challenged Tommy to a duel.

Objects/Places

Gausse's Hotel: The Divers convinced Gausse to open up this hotel on the French Riviera. Fashionable people spend summers here, and it is where the book starts.

Mother: An authoritative symbol, Rosemary admires her and would never disobey her.

The Riviera: An area in the south of France and where the book starts and Gausse's Hotel is. Also, the location of the Villa Diana.

The transparent swimsuit: Nicole sews this for Dick, but with skin-colored material underneath it. Rosemary is delighted by it, and it shows the expensive simplicity of the Divers.

La Turbie: The place they shoot movies in Monte Carlo. It reminds Rosemary of Hollywood.

Daddy's Girl: The movie Rosemary made that made her famous.

The bathroom (in Villa Diana): In here, Violet McKisco sees something that she never speaks about because people prevent her. However, it is the cause of the duel.

The duel: This occurs between Tommy Barban and Mr. McKisco, and is started because Tommy tells Mr. McKisco to shut his wife up, when she wants to talk about what she saw in the bathroom.

Compliments: Used very often by Dick to win people over, these are often not genuine, and people start to get tired of them. However, they work on Rosemary.

Paris: After spending time in the Riviera, the Norths, the Divers, and Rosemary go to Paris.

Franco-American Films: A studio in Paris, this is where Rosemary takes everyone to watch Daddy's Girl on her birthday, and where an American man Dick meets is hoping to get a role.

The exploiters: The group of people at the party Dick and Rosemary go to, who are very comfortable and set the tone of the party, however, do not have fun.

The train (Easter): Running between New York and Chicago, Rosemary and Bill Hillis close the blinds to their compartment and lock the door on this train. This causes an argument with the conductor and makes Dick jealous.

Zurich: Where Dick works and lives some months of the year- first for Dr. Dohmler, and then at his own clinic.

Dohmler's clinic: A mental clinic where Nicole is first admitted. It was started by Dr. Dohmler.

Chicago: Where the Warren family is from.

New York: Where Dick is originally from. He returns there when his father dies, and then moves there permanently when he and Nicole divorce.

Naples: Where Dick meets up with Rosemary, when he leaves Nicole for a while.

Rome: Where Dick gets arrested for fighting a cab driver and a police officer.

London: Beth wants Dick and Nicole to move here because it is more 'proper', but Dick refuses.

Car accident: After fighting, the Diver family gets into the car and Dick starts driving. Because Nicole keeps shouting at him, they get into a car accident. However, when they get out, all Nicole can do is laugh.

Police Station: After getting into a fight with a cab driver, Dick ends up at the police station, where he punches a police officer.

Alcohol Problem: Dick develops an alcohol problem, after which nobody likes him anymore, and he is told to take a leave of absence from his work.

Villa Diana: The Diver's home on the French Riviera.

Barbershop: This is where Tommy meets Dick and Nicole, and where Nicole and Tommy tell Dick that they love each other, and that Nicole will leave Dick.

Quotes

Quote 1: "[A] bald man in a monocle and a pair of tights, his tufted chest thrown out, his brash navel sucked in, was regarding her attentively." Book 1, Chapter 1, pg. 5

Quote 2: "[S]o that while Rosemary was a 'simple' child she was protected by a double sheath of her mother's armor and her own - she had a mature distrust of the trivial, the facile and the vulgar." Book 1, Chapter 3, pg. 13

Quote 3: "You're the only girl I've seen for a very long time that actually did look like something blooming." Book 1, Chapter 4, pg. 22

Quote 4: "so green and cool that the leaves and petals were curled with tender damp." Book 1, Chapter 6, pg. 25

Quote 5: "[H]e opened the gate to his amusing world. So long as they subscribed to it completely, their happiness was his preoccupation, bit at the fist flicker of doubt as to its all-inclusiveness he evaporated before their eyes, leaving little communicable memory of what he had said or done." Book 1, Chapter 6, pg. 28

Quote 6: "[T]he moment when the guests had been daringly lifted above conviviality into the rarer atmosphere of sentiment, was over before it could be irreverently breathed, before they had half realized it was there." Book 1, Chapter 7, pg. 34

Quote 7: "the too obvious appeal, the struggle with an unrehearsed scene and unfamiliar words." Book 1, Chapter 8, pg. 39

Quote 8: "[O]f course it's done at a certain sacrifice - sometimes they seem just rather charming figures in a ballet, and worth the attention you five a ballet, but it's more than that - you'd have to know the story. Anyhow Tommy is one of those men that Dick's passed along to Nicole." Book 1, Chapter 10, pg. 43

Quote 9: "She illustrated very simple principles, containing in herself her own doom, but illustrated them so accurately that there was grace in the procedure, and presently Rosemary would try to imitate it." Book 1, Chapter 12, pg. 55

Quote 10: "Indeed, he had made a quick study of the whole affair, simplifying it always until it bore a faint resemblance to one of his own parties." Book 1, Chapter 13, pg. 59

Quote 11: "He knew that there was passion there, but there was no shadow of it in her eyes or on her mouth; there was a faint spray of champagne on her breath. She clung nearer desperately and once more he kissed her and was chilled by the innocence of her kiss, by the glance that at the moment of contact looked beyond him out into the darkness of the night, the darkness of the world." Book 1, Chapter 15, pg. 63

Quote 12: "The enthusiasm, the selflessness behind the whole performance ravished her, the technic of moving many varied types, each as immobile, as dependent on supplies of attention as an infantry battalion as dependent on rations, appeared so effortless that he still had pieces of his own most personal self for everyone." Book 1, Chapter 18, pg. 77

Quote 13: "[T]he shots had entered into all their lives: echoes of violence followed them out onto the pavement where two porters held a post-mortem beside them as they waited for a taxi." Book 1, Chapter 19, pg. 85

Quote 14: "made an exit that she had learned young, and on which no director had ever tried to improve." Book 1, Chapter 25, pg. 109

Quote 15: "And Lucky Dick can't be one of those clever men; he must be less intact, even faintly destroyed. If life won't do it for him it's not a substitute to get a disease, or a broken heart, or an inferiority complex, though it'd be nice to build out some broken side till it was better than the original structure." Book 2, Chapter 1, pg. 116

Quote 16: "They said that you are a doctor, but so long as you are a cat it is different. My head aches so, so excuse this walking there like a ordinary with a white cat will explain, I think." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 122

Quote 17: "I am slowly coming back to life...I wish someone were in love with me like boys were ages ago before I was sick. I suppose it will be years, though, before I could think of anything like that." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 124

Quote 18: "We were just like lovers--and then all at once we were lovers--and ten minutes after it happened I could have shot myself--except I guess I'm such a Goddamned degenerate I didn't have the nerve to do it." Book 2, Chapter 3, pg. 129

Quote 19: "God, am I like the rest after all?" Book 2, Chapter 4, pg. 133

Quote 20: "A woman never knows/ What a good man she's got/ Till after she turns him down." Book 2, Chapter 5, pg. 136

Quote 21: "The weakness of the profession is its attraction for the man a little crippled and broken." Book 2, Chapter 6, pg. 137

Quote 22: "Nicole's world had fallen to pieces, but it was only a flimsy and scarcely created world." Book 2, Chapter 7, pg. 143

Quote 23: "the delight on Nicole's face--to be a feather again instead of a plummet, to float and not to drag." Book 2, Chapter 8, pg. 149

Quote 24: "And if I don't know you're the most attractive man I ever met you must think I am still crazy. It's my hard luck, all right--but don't pretend that I don't know--I know everything about you and me." Book 2, Chapter 9, pg. 154

Quote 25: "As an indifference cherished, or left to atrophy, becomes an emptiness, to this extent he had learned to become empty of Nicole, serving her against his will with negations and emotional neglect." Book 2, Chapter 11, pg. 168

Quote 26: "We own you, and you'll admit it sooner or later. It is absurd to keep up the pretense of independence." Book 2, Chapter 13, pg. 177

Quote 27: "Good manners are an admission that everybody is so tender that they have to be handled with gloves. Now, human respect--you don't call a man a coward or a liar lightly, but if you spend your life sparing people's feelings and feeding their vanity, you get so you can't distinguish what should be respected in them." Book 2, Chapter 13, pg. 178

Quote 28: "England was like a rich man after a disastrous orgy who makes up to the household by chatting with them individually, when it is obvious to them that he is only trying to get back his self-respect in order to usurp his former power." Book 2, Chapter 16, pg. 195

Quote 29: "Good-by, my father--good-by, all my fathers." Book 2, Chapter 19, pg. 205

Quote 30: "[The actors had] risen to a position of prominence in a nation that for a decade had wanted only to be entertained." Book 2, Chapter 20, pg. 213

Quote 31: "[S]he only cherishes her illness as an instrument of power." Book 3, Chapter 1, pg. 239

Quote 32: "There was some element of loneliness involved--so easy to be loved--so hard to love." Book 3, Chapter 2, pg. 245

Quote 33: "[T]o explain, to patch--these were not natural functions at their age--better to continue with the cracked echo of an old truth in the ears." Book 3, Chapter 2, pg. 256

Quote 34: "Not without desperation he had long felt the ethics of his profession dissolving into a lifeless mass." Book 3, Chapter 3, pg. 256

Quote 35: "If Europe ever goes Bolshevik she'll turn up as the bride of Stalin." Book 3, Chapter 4, pg. 259

Quote 36: "We can't go on like this--or can we?....What do you think?... Some of the time I think its my fault--I've ruined you." Book 3, Chapter 5, pg. 267

Quote 37: "So you ruined me, did you? ...Then we're both ruined..." Book 3, Chapter 5, pg. 273

Quote 38: "She was somewhat shocked at the idea of being interested in another man--but other women have lovers--why not me?" Book 3, Chapter 6, pg. 276

Quote 39: "If she need not, in her spirit, be forever one with Dick as he had appeared last night, she must be something in addition, not just an image on his mind, condemned to endless parades around the circumference of a medal." Book 3, Chapter 6, pg. 277

Quote 40: "So delicately balanced was she between an old foothold that had always guaranteed her security, and the imminence of a leap from which she might alight changed in the very chemistry of blood and muscle, that she did not dare bring the matter into the true forefront of consciousness." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 279

Quote 41: "He's not received anywhere anymore." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 287

Quote 42: "Either you think--or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 290

Quote 43: "No, I'm not really--I'm just a--I'm just a whole lot of different simple people." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 292

Quote 44: "Everything Tommy said became part of her forever." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 293

Quote 45: "Tangled with love in the moonlight she welcomed the anarchy of her lover." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 298

Quote 46: "Then why did you come, Nicole? I can't do anything for you anymore. I'm trying to save myself." Book 3, Chapter 9, pg. 301

Quote 47: "I have never seen women like this sort of women. I have known many of the great courtesans of the world, and for them I have much respect often, but women like these women I have never seen before." Book 3, Chapter 10, Page 306

Quote 48: "You don't understand Nicole. You treat her always as a patient because she was once sick." Book 3, Chapter 11, pg. 308

Quote 49: "When people are taken out of their depths they lose their heads, no matter how charming a bluff they put up." Book 3, Chapter 12, pg. 312

Topic Tracking: The English

English 1: There were two types of people at the party that Rosemary and Dick went to: the Americans and English, who had been there all summer and where quiet at times, and explosive at others; and the 'exploiters', who were sober, serious people with no time for fun.

English 2: The American man that Dick met on the street was in the business of selling papers, was in that area because he wanted to audition for the part of the guy who could speak English in the nearby American movie theater.

English 3: Dick observed a few things about the attitudes the English had towards the Swiss- they seemed to be suspicious of them because of their association with the Germans, and they commented on how their cable cars are superior to those in Switzerland and Germany. He found that ill will still existed from the war.

English 4: Dick saw Nicole and Beth in their ski suits from across the room. Nicole's face lit up when she saw Dick. Beth had brought two Englishman along with her. Beth liked the English.

English 5: Dick, Beth, and the Englishmen engaged in a discussion about manners, and Dick patronized one of the Englishman. Beth thinks that English people have more manners and are more 'proper' than others.

English 6: Dick thought that most of the patients liked him better than Dr. Gregorovius. Dick also thought about one of his patients, an English woman, who spoke to him about the music at the clinic. Dick asked her when she was going to play something for all of them, even though he knew she did not know how to play anything.

English 7: Dick spoke to an Englishman, feeling that, "England was like a rich man after a disastrous orgy who makes up to the household by chatting with them individually, when it is obvious to them that he is only trying to get back his self-respect in order to usurp his former power." Book 2, Chapter 16, pg. 195

English 8: Baby suggested that Nicole and Dick live in London for a couple of months around sane, English people, rather than keeping Nicole at the clinic. Baby and Dick disagreed about the English. Baby tried to convince him to go to London, telling him how much money she had. Dick did not want to go to London. Beth thinks that English people are more 'proper' than others.

English 9: Beth told Dick that the reason she hadn't married yet was because she had fallen in love with two Englishmen: one of them was killed in the war, and the other one broke her heart.

English 10: Dick noticed a pretty blond English girl smiling at him so he went over to her and asked her to dance. When he went back to the dance floor to find the girl, she had disappeared. He had wanted an English girl to dance with sicne he felt comfortable around them.

English 11: Baby immediately headed to the police station and arrived to hear Dick screaming, asking if there were any English or Americans, since she felt comfortable around them and felt that they understood her.

Topic Tracking: Love

Love 1: At almost two, Rosemary and her mother went to the dining room for lunch. Rosemary informed her mother that she had fallen in love at the beach.

Love 2: Later, she cried in her mother's lap, and told her mother that she loved Dick, but that she also liked his wife, and that it was hopeless. When her mother said that she would like to meet him, Rosemary answered that they had invited them to dinner on Friday.

Love 3: Dick had the ability to make everybody around him feel special and loved by him. He won everyone quickly with his exquisite consideration and politeness.

Love 4: Dick then paid her a few compliments and said that she especially intrigued Nicole when they had first seen her. Feeling that she was being passed along to Nicole, Rosemary again told Dick that she had fallen in love with him since the moment she had seen him.

Love 5: Rosemary saw Campion crying and asked him what the matter was. Campion replied by saying that it was better to be young and cold than to bear the sorrow that love brings.

Love 6: Rosemary recognized the two passionate voices as Dick's and Nicole's, and they were expressing their love and passion for each other.

Love 7: Meeting up with the rest of the group, Dick pointed to a plain and told Rosemary that that land cost twenty lives a foot in the summer of the war. Rosemary was so engrossed in Dick that she would have believed anything he said. Her love had reached a point where she was beginning to be unhappy and desperate. She didn't know what to do and wanted to talk to her mother.

Love 8: Rosemary smiled and told Dick that she was in love with him and Nicole, and that she couldn't even talk to anybody about him because she didn't want anyone to know how wonderful they were. Dick had heard this many times--even the formula was the same. She then kissed him and lay on his arm and sighed, telling him that she had decided to give him up, since she loved him so much.

Love 9: When Dick told Rosemary that he loved Nicole, she answered by saying that he could love more than one person. Finally, he said that he didn't love her, and when she said that she didn't expect that, he simply stated that she was too young, and that there would be much to teach her.

Love 10: Dick told Rosemary that although he loved her, there was nothing they could do about it, and that Nicole must never find out. After Rosemary said that nothing matters, as long as he loves her, he continued to say that Nicole must not suffer, and that he also loved Nicole and she loved him.

Love 11: After hearing about Rosemary with a third person, Dick felt a change within himHe could vividly picture every minute of the story, including Bill asking Rosemary if she would mind if he pulled the curtain down. Whereas the story had no impression on Collis, except that it proved to him that Rosemary was 'human', Dick realized that Collis was in love with Rosemary.

Love 12: When Rosemary and Dick walked into the bathroom where sounds were coming out of, they found Nicole rocking and crying and she shouted at Dick that he she never expected him to love her, but to give her privacy in the bathroom - the only place she can be alone.

Love 13: Nicole's later letters to Dick read, "I am slowly coming back to life...I wish someone were in love with me like boys were ages ago before I was sick. I suppose it will be years, though, before I could think of anything like that." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 124

Love 14: Dick started to think about his life and wondered: "God, am I like the rest after all?" Book 2, Chapter 4, pg. 133 He thought about how he wanted to be good and wise and loved.

Love 15: Dick commented on his profession and said that, "The weakness of the profession is its attraction for the man a little crippled and broken." Book 2, Chapter 6, pg. 137 Dick considered himself to be one of these men, while he felt that Franz was chosen by fate to be a psychiatrist. Franz thought that Dick was oversimplifying things. They discussed the fact that Dick liked Nicole and that Nicole was possibly in love with Dick.

Love 16: Franz said that he did not think it was necessary for either Nicole or Dick to go away. Dick admitted that he was half in love with Nicole and that he had thought of marrying her. Franz interrupted and said that they would be doomed to fail, and that he might as well never see her again. Dick agreed.

Love 17: Dick assured Beth that Nicole's recent behavior had been normal. Baby then told Dick that she had a plan to move Nicole to the south side of Chicago, where old Chicago families live, and where Nicole could fall in love with a nice doctor. Dick laughed at her suggestion that the Warrens could buy Nicole a doctor.

Love 18: Dick told Nicole that he couldn't fall in love with her and Nicole said that he never gave her a chance. She asked Dick for a chance.

Love 19: Nicole said that she and Dick were in love, that he was going to take care of her, and the two would live simply, without all of her money. She then, however, accepted her family's money so that she could maintain her lifestyle. She wanted the nicer apartment, and then she wanted to spend her money so that they could have a house.

Love 20: Nicole had two children, and after her second child, Topsy, she started to go crazy again. Nicole talked about how work is everything and knowledge is important. She mentioned her friend Mary, and Tommy who was in love with her.

Love 21: Elsie told him that Rosemary was in love with him and that he was the only man that she had ever cared about. Dick told her that he was in love with Rosemary.

Love 22: Dick arrived in Innsbruck and started thinking about how Nicole was far away. He remembered how he loved her when she was at her best. But, Dick needed to go away to find himself again.

Love 23: Dick started falling in love with every pretty girl that he saw.

Love 24: Baby asked if Dick thought Nicole would be better off with someone else. Dick was annoyed with this question because he loved Nicole.

Love 25: Dick asked Beth why she hasn't married yet. She told him that one of the Englishmen she loved was killed in the war, and the other one broke her heart.

Love 26: When Dick had lunch with Rosemary and he realized that they were not in love. There was less passion between them than there was before.

Love 27: As they talk, Dick started to think about his relationships with his lovers and friends. In thinking of these relationships, he realized that, "There was some element of loneliness involved-so easy to be loved-so hard to love." Book 3, Chapter 2, pg. 245

Love 28: Tommy called Nicole, asking her to meet him in Cannes. He wanted her to tell him that she loved him. She told him that she does.

Love 29: Dick and Nicole went to a café with Tommy and Tommy told Dick that Nicole was in love with him. Tommy wanted Dick to admit that their marriage is over. Nicole told Dick that she has grown fond of Tommy. She told Dick that things were never the same after Rosemary.

Topic Tracking: Money

Money 1: When shopping, Rosemary spent her money carefully, buying limited items, whereas Nicole shopped for herself and bought everything she liked that she couldn't use for other people, and it seemed as if everybody and everything gave way to her.

Money 2: When Dick asked if Rosemary wanted to go into the party, and Rosemary said that she didn't care, Dick said that they had to because one of the ladies inside wanted to buy pictures from a friend of his who needed the money. However, he warned Rosemary that she wouldn't like the people, and told her that they would only stay for five minutes.

Money 3: Rosemary noticed that she and Nicole spent money in very different ways. Whereas Nicole was sure the money that she spent was hers, Rosemary spent money as if it had been lent to her and she had to be careful where she spent it. Rosemary admired Nicole's way of spending.

Money 4: Beth wanted to make sure that Dick was not trying to marry Nicole just because she is rich.

Money 5: After saying that money didn't matter, Nicole accepted her family's money so that she could maintain her lifestyle. She wanted the nicer apartment, and then she wanted to spend her money so that they could have a house. She rambled about her travels with Dick- they traveled all over the world that year.

Money 6: It was very important to Dick for him to pay his share of everything. Nicole had rejected the simple arrangement they had made in Zurich and spent money extravagantly. Dick felt that his work was not as important because Nicole made more money than he did.

Money 7: Beth told Dick of a property of their mother's that had been sold and asked him if he knew how to invest Nicole's share of the money. Dick felt insulted by this.

Money 8: Beth liked the possibility of Nicole living close to a mental clinic and told Dick that he and she should think it over. Dick really felt like she was saying: "We own you, and you'll admit it sooner or later. It is absurd to keep up the pretense of independence." Book 2, Chapter 13, pg. 177 Dick resents Beth's "cold rich insolence."

Money 9: Dick had never felt more secure with himself than when he was with Nicole, although he admitted that her money made him feel trapped in the marriage.

Money 10: Dick began to think of fond memories of his father, the cleric, who had always had a good heart. Dick remembered how his father used his mother's money to put him through medical school; and how it was different to the way he was spending money now.

Money 11: Kaethe said that Nicole would not come close to her or let their children play together. Franz asked her to stop insulting Nicole since it was her money that enabled them to open to the clinic.

Money 12: Dick told Franz that he wanted to leave the clinic for good, and Franz agreed, saying that he had expected this and that he could give Dick back all of Nicole's money by the end of the year. Dick felt a sense of relief. "Not without desperation he had long felt the ethics of his profession dissolving into a lifeless mass." Book 3, Chapter 3, pg. 256

Money 13: Since they sold Nicole's share of the clinic and they had investments in America, money was plentiful and the Divers were able to travel extravagantly. They traveled with maids and governesses, who help them with their extensive amount of baggage on the train. The Divers attracted attention as if they were a royal family.

Money 14: For months Nicole had sensed that things between she and Dick were changing. Dick had become increasingly indifferent, and he had been drinking too much. Nicole could not determine how Dick was going to behave from one day to the next. Nicole was ready for a change, and she felt that it would be a relief. Her money acted as a security blanket for her.

Money 15: Tommy told Nicole that she was the most dramatic person he had ever known. He told her that she had too much money--and that "Dick can't beat that." Nicole asked him what she should do. "Everything Tommy said became part of her forever." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 293

Topic Tracking: Sickness

Sickness 1: After the duel, Abe was sick in the bushes.

Sickness 2: Sick and injured men were still visibly present in Switzerland, and posters and other reminders of the war still remained. The pride that the Swiss first felt about their part in the war was fading as the killing continued.

Sickness 3: In her letters to Dick, Nicole kept referring to her sickness, and she repeatedly wrote, "excuse all this." She told him about her experiences with doctors, and how she wanted to leave the institution in Chicago. Some of the letters were desperate, with Nicole pleading for Dr. Diver to help her with her mental problems.

Sickness 4: After a month of receiving no letters from Nicole, Dr. Diver began to receive letters that seemed sane and normal. Her later letters read, "I am slowly coming back to life...I wish someone were in love with me like boys were ages ago before I was sick." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 124

Sickness 5: Mr. Hannan jokingly asked Dick why he was fooling around with his aunt and what he was doing in Munich. Tommy remarked that Dick doesn't look very well.

Sickness 6: Frau Kaethe Gregorovius asked Franz how Nicole was doing. She assumed that Nicole must be sick since she saw him so much, and she told him that she was not fond of Nicole. Franz told her that he had to take care of Nicole since Dick had been away, but he told her that Dick would be returning from Rome the next day.

Sickness 7: Kaethe accused Nicole of being less sick than she acts, and said that, "she only cherishes her illness as an instrument of power." Book 3, Chapter 1, pg. 239

Sickness 8: When visiting Mary North, Lanier was waiting for his parents in their suite and he told them that he had taken a bath in the same water as the sick child. Dick told Lanier to go take a bath in their room right away.

Sickness 9: At the café, Tommy said to Dick, "You don't understand Nicole. You treat her always as a patient because she was once sick." Book 3, Chapter 11, pg. 308

Book 1, Chapter 1

About half way between Marseilles and the Italian Border, on the shore of the French Riviera, is a large, rose-colored hotel with palm trees in front of it. Many fashionable people spend there summers here at Gausse's Hotel des Etrangers, and there are a dozen villas spread about between it and Cannes, which is five miles away. The beach was quiet in the morning expect for a man came down to the beach in a blue bathrobe and swam in the sea for a minute before deciding that the water was too cold. An hour after that, merchantmen and busboys started working. Here, on a June morning in 1925, a woman and her daughter arrived, and were brought down to Gausse's hotel. The mother's face was one of fading prettiness, yet much awareness and tranquility; whereas the seventeen-year-old daughter had curly, blonde hair; big, bright eyes, and rosy cheeks.

The mother did not think that they would like the place, and the daughter, Rosemary, wanted to go home, and so they decided that they would only stay for three days. After making the reservation in flat French, the girl walked out onto the veranda and looked out onto the beach where she noticed a Buick parked in the hotel drive. Also, she noticed that the beach was the only place which was active: there were three British nannies knitting, there were a dozen people sitting under umbrellas, and then there were a dozen children chasing fish in the sea.

As Rosemary stepped out to the beach, a twelve-year-old boy ran past her and into the sea. Feeling that people were watching, she took off her bathrobe and followed the boy. She walked out into the sea until the water was breast-high, and then glanced back to the shore, where "a bald man in a monocle and a pair of tights, his tufted chest thrown out, his brash navel sucked in, was regarding her attentively." Book 1, Chapter 1, pg. 5 As she returned to the shore, the man, holding a bottle, informed her that there were sharks in the sea, behind the raft to which she swam. Rosemary was surprised, and then looked for a place to sit. Each family possessed the strip of beach directly in front of their umbrella, and there was much talking between people, creating a community. Farther up on the beach was a group of people with skin as white as her own, sitting under some hand-parasols. Rosemary found a spot between the dark people and the white ones and lay down on her beach-towel. After a while, the man with the monocle appeared above her and complimented her on her swimming. He then introduced himself as Campion, and said that there was a lady who said she knew her and had seen her in Sorrento the previous week. Annoyed, Rosemary saw the un-tanned people waiting and reluctantly went over to them. After introducing themselves as Mrs. Abrams, Mrs. McKisco, Mr. McKisco, and Mr. Dumphry, one of the women said that she recognized her as Rosemary Hoyt, and wanted to tell her that she was a marvelous actress, and asked why she wasn't back in America making more films. Then, she warned her about getting burned the first day in the sun because her skin is so important.

Book 1, Chapter 2

Mrs. McKisco said that they thought maybe Rosemary was in the plot, and that they didn't know who was and who wasn't in the plot but that her husband knew a man who turned out to be a main character, practically the assistant hero. When Rosemary inquired if there was definitely a plot, Mrs. Abrams jumped in and said that they didn't know because they weren't in it. As they continued talking, Rosemary wished that her mother was there to get them out of this uncomfortable situation. She decided that she did not like these people, particularly when comparing them to the other people who interested her - on the other side of the beach. After asking if she had been there long, they all went for a swim. After swimming a little bit, Mr. McKisco admitted that he did not know how to breathe while swimming. Rosemary explained that he should breathe out under the water, and roll his head over for air every fourth beat. Then, they swam to the raft, where a man helped up Mrs. McKisco for he thought that the raft had hit her. His voice was slow and shy, and he had one of the saddest faces Rosemary had ever seen, with the high cheekbones of an Indian, a long upper lip, and enormous golden eyes. Having made sure that Mrs. McKisco was alright, he swam off. Rosemary commented that he was a good swimmer, and was surprised when Mrs. McKisco replied that he was a bad musician. Her husband agreed that Abe North was a rotten musician. Abe then swam over to Mrs. Diver, who had her two children in the water with her, and picked up one of the children onto his shoulders. The child yelled with excitement, and the woman watched, without smiling. Mrs. McKisco then stated that Mrs. Diver was not staying at the hotel, and returned to asking Rosemary more questions.

Rosemary then swam back to shore and lay down in the sun. As a man in a jockey cap created excitement on the beach, she slowly saw Campion come towards her, and she pretended to be asleep. After a while, she really did fall asleep and woke up sun burnt. She realized that the beach was deserted, except for the man in the jockey cap, who told her that he was going to wake her before he left. She laughed, inviting him to talk, but Dick Diver was already carrying a tent and beach umbrella up to a waiting car. He came back, and gathered up the rest of his belongings: a rake, a shovel and a sieve, and stowed them in a crevice of a rock. He checked that he hadn't left anything and then answered Rosemary's question of the time by saying that it was a half past one - not one of the worst times of day. He then looked at her with his blue eyes for a moment, and she felt eager and confident. She then went back to the hotel.

Book 1, Chapter 3

At almost two, Rosemary and her mother went to the dining room for lunch. Rosemary informed her mother that she had fallen in love at the beach.

Topic Tracking: Love 1

Her mother inquired whether she spoke to him, and Rosemary said that she had, just a little, and that he was very handsome with reddish hair, but married, as usual. Rosemary's mother was her best friend, and she had put every effort into guiding her. She, Mrs. Elsie Speers, had no personal resentments or bitterness about life, and had been twice satisfactorily married and twice widowed. One of her husbands was a cavalry officer and one an army doctor. She had not spared Rosemary, and had thus made her hard. By not sparing her own labor and devotion, she had cultivated an idealism in Rosemary, "so that while Rosemary was a 'simple' child she was protected by a double sheath of her mother's armor and her own - she had a mature distrust of the trivial, the facile and the vulgar." Book 1, Chapter 3, pg. 13

Mrs. Speers then asked Rosemary if she liked it at Gausse's hotel, and Rosemary said that it might be fun if she knew those people, but that the people who spoke with her were not very nice. Then, she complained that they recognized her, and that everybody had seen "Daddy's Girl". Mrs. Speers waited until Rosemary's egotism subsided and then asked when she was going to go see Earl Brady. They decided that they would definitely see him some day before they left.

Rosemary then took the bus to the train station, and felt uncomfortable by the people staring at her silently. On the train, the first class compartment was filled with advertising and had its own atmosphere, created by the people in it who were scornful of the world around them which was less swift. At the station in Cannes, a dozen cab drivers slept.

As she came out of drug the store with a bottle of coconut oil, she saw Mrs. Diver, arms full of sofa-cushions, go to a car where a black dog was barking. The car's chauffeur woke with a start, and Mrs. Diver sat in the car, looking bravely straight ahead toward nothing, wearing a bright red dress, with her thick, dark, gold hair. Having half an hour left to wait for her train, Rosemary sat down in the Café des Allies, and starting reading The Saturday Evening Post, which she had bought for her mother, as she drank her lemonade. She had also bought Le Temps, but she found the memoirs of a Russian princess in The Saturday Evening Post more appealing. Being used to everything being either tragic or comic, she found the French life empty and stale. This was accentuated by the sad tunes of the orchestra playing. She was glad that she was returning to Gausse's Hotel.

Her shoulders were too burned to swim the next day, so she and her mother hired a car and drove along the Riviera. The chauffeur, a Russian Czar from the period of Ivan the Terrible, was a fabulous guide who knew of all the kings and rajahs who had come to the area for several reasons, and brought the names of different towns and places to life.

Book 1, Chapter 4

The next day, the McKiscos were not there when she arrived on the beach, and she had barely spread her things when two men, the one with the jockey cap and the tall blonde one, left their group and came down to speak to her. Dick Diver first asked why she had stayed away from them yesterday and invited her to sit with them. His tone was kind, and by not saying her name he led her to believe that although they all knew who she was, they respected her privacy. Rosemary valued this courtesy tremendously and joined them.

Nicole Diver was wearing her pearls, as she had been the day before, and was looking for the recipe for chicken Maryland in a recipe book. Rosemary guessed that she was about twenty-four and realized the bold features of her face - from her brow to her lips. When she asked Rosemary if they were staying long, Rosemary realized that they might be there for another week, and answered that they were not staying very long. Trying to change the subject, she asked Nicole if she liked it where they were staying. To this, Abe North said that they had to like it since they invented it by convincing Gausse, two years ago, to keep the hotel open and keep on a cook and a chasseur. This year, the hotel did even better than last year. However, they do not stay at the hotel since they built a house up at Tarnes. The conversation then turned to the nationality of the people at the hotel, and the many strange names they had. During the conversation, everybody except for Nicole left, and Rosemary found that it was even quieter with Nicole than it was with her mother. Rosemary took note of the belongings that the group had, among which were a portable bathhouse for dressing and a pneumatic rubber house. There were many things that she had not seen before, and she considered the group to be rather fashionable people, and realized that these objects were probably from the first set of luxury manufacturing after the war; however, her mother had told her to beware of such people as drones, but she did not feel that way here.

She wondered about the interrelations of the group, but decided that it did not matter since they were all having a good time. Then, she wondered about the gentlemen of the group and decided that although they all seemed genuinely gentle, they were each very different. Barban was less civilized, more scoffing and skeptical, yet remained formal. Abe North had an amusing, but puzzling, sense of humor, and yet appeared to be very shy. She did not feel that she could judge him. Dick Diver was perfect, and she took a moment to admire him. He had a perfect reddish complexion, with bright blue eyes, and a perfect nose. He looked directly at the people he was talking to, and had a capturing voice. Yet, she could tell that there were layers of self-control and self-discipline in him, just like there were in her. Nicole saw her admire him and heard Rosemary sigh at the fact that he was taken.

Soon, the other party that Rosemary had met arrived, and took their place on the beach. Nicole complained that their were too many people on the beach that Dick had made, but remarked that the present crowd was better than the British one that had shared the beach with them last summer. Then, she informed Rosemary about a fight that had taken place the day prior to her arrival, when Mr. McKisco was having an argument with his wife, and she tossed some sand in his face, after which he sat on top of her and rubbed her face in the sand. In response to this, Dick said that he would go and invite the other party to lunch. Nicole said that she would not have it, and that she was very content with things the way they were, and thus there was not need to invite them. Furthermore, she said, it was time that they all went swimming. She handed Dick her sewing and told him to go put it on. When he emerged, it appeared that he was wearing a transparent black lace swimsuit; but upon inspection, it was found that it was lined with flesh-colored cloth.

Rosemary was delighted with the swimsuit, and responded whole-heartedly to the expensive simplicity of the Divers. However, she was unaware of the struggles they had endured in order to attain the simple virtues that they had. They then drank some sherry and ate crackers. Dick looked at her with his cold blue eyes and said, "You're the only girl I've seen for a very long time that actually did look like something blooming." Book 1, Chapter 4, pg. 22

Later, she cried in her mother's lap, and told her mother that she loved Dick, but that she also liked his wife, and that it was hopeless. When her mother said that she would like to meet him, Rosemary answered that they had invited them to dinner on Friday.

Topic Tracking: Love 2

Book 1, Chapter 5

Rosemary went to Monte Carlo sulking as much as possible. When she arrived to La Turbie, the place looked like Hollywood as there was the bizarre debris of a recent movie. After waiting for ten minutes, a young man hurried down to the gate, apologized for keeping her waiting, and told her to come in and that Mr. Brady was on the set, but anxious to see her. At the end of the scene that he was shooting, Brady came over and spoke with Rosemary, complimenting her on her movie - Daddy's Girl, and inquiring if she was signed. She was. Brady kept looking Rosemary up and down, and she realized that he desired her. However, should she surrender, she would forget him half an hour after she left. Brady stated that the offer he had extended to her about working with he still stood, but that he could not move back to Hollywood. Then, he resumed making his movie. Rosemary left, but her view of the Mediterranean had changed since she now knew that there was a studio there.

Book 1, Chapter 6

The wine she had at lunch made Nicole feel good, and she took a walk in the grassless garden. She was somewhat surprised when she turned to walk the other way and found an area "so green and cool that the leaves and petals were curled with tender damp." Book 1, Chapter 6, pg. 25 Her face was very stern, but her eyes were soft, and her once-fair hair had darkened over time. Nevertheless, she looked more beautiful now at twenty-four than she had ever looked. After walking for a while, she stood looking down at the Mediterranean. Dick saw her from afar and picked up his megaphone to inform her that he had invited Mrs. Abrams to dinner. Nicole said that she suspected it and that it was an outrage. Dick then continued to say that he was going to invite more people - the two young men - and that he wanted to give a really bad party, with a brawl, seductions, women passed out, and people going home with their feelings hurt. He then went back into the house.

Nicole realized that one of his mood swings was coming on, where his excitement swept everybody around into it, and reached an intensity out of proportion with the things he was excited about. Dick had the ability to make everybody around him feel special and loved by him. He won everyone quickly with his exquisite consideration and politeness.

Topic Tracking: Love 3

Then, without caution, "he opened the gate to his amusing world. So long as they subscribed to it completely, their happiness was his preoccupation, bit at the fist flicker of doubt as to its all-inclusiveness he evaporated before their eyes, leaving little communicable memory of what he had said or done." Book 1, Chapter 6, pg. 28

Rosemary and her mother arrived at eight thirty, and Dick greeted them as they exclaimed about the beauty of the garden. Next, Earl Brady arrived, and was surprised to see Rosemary there. She quickly compared him to Dick Diver and found Earl to be gross and ill bred. Earl then asked the Diver children to sing him a song, which they did. Meanwhile, the McKiscos, Mrs. Abrams, Mr. Dumphry and Mr. Campion arrived. This disappointed Rosemary, but Dick's expression was not unusual, and since she believed in him so much, she immediately accepted the rightness of their presence, as if she had expected them to be there all along.

Rosemary stood next to Tommy Barban, and since he was leaving in the morning, she asked him if he was going home. He scornfully replied that he had no home and that he was going to war. He didn't care what war, any war would do, and that when he was in a rut, he would come see the Divers and that would make him want to go to war again. Rosemary left Tommy and found Dick. Her mother had never permitted romances, so when she had approved of Dick, Rosemary knew that it meant that he was the 'real thing'. Before she knew it, she was sitting at the dinner table between Luis Campion and Brady. Her mother was sitting next to Dick.

Book 1, Chapter 7

Rosemary noticed Nicole, who was sitting between Tommy Barban and Abe North. She realized that everybody had changed and was putting on their best front, and suddenly she liked everyone; except McKisco who was drinking too much, and who kept interrupting Dick's conversation with useless remarks and questions, to which Dick as indifferent, and after which the conversation would continue. Rosemary slowly studied each person around the table, finding Nicole to be one of the most beautiful people she had ever seen, and slowly becoming aware of the magic that had filled the air. The Divers were talking to everyone at once, making everyone feel at home and assuring them of their friendliness and affection. Then, abruptly, the table broke up and "the moment when the guests had been daringly lifted above conviviality into the rarer atmosphere of sentiment, was over before it could be irreverently breathed, before they had half realized it was there." Book 1, Chapter 7, pg. 34

Nicole then approached Rosemary's mother and gave her a yellow evening bag that she had previously admired, telling her that things ought to belong to people who like them. Nicole then disappeared and Rosemary realized that Dick wasn't there either. The guests then distributed themselves in the garden and the terrace. Violet McKisco went to the bathroom, and Rosemary waited around for Dick to reappear, listening to the heated conversation about war between McKisco and Barban. She was about to join her mother when Violet came excitedly rushing down from the house. When Rosemary asked what was wrong, she said that nothing was wrong but that it was it was inadvisable to comment on what goes on in that house.

Book 1, Chapter 8

Dick then reappeared and separated McKisco and Barban, engaging McKisco in a conversation about literature in order to make him feel superior. Meanwhile, the others helped carry lamps through the darkness. Rosemary thought about Dick and that by now, she must have earned time alone with him because his rules must be the same as the ones her mother taught her. She was right and Dick detached her from the crowd on the terrace and brought her inside, where they looked over the Mediterranean.

Dick told Rosemary that he now understood why she spoke so highly of her mother and also that her mother had told him that the amount of time they spend in France depends on her. He continued by saying that since the summer was over, as everybody was leaving in the next few days, he wanted her to go to Paris with him and Nicole to see Abe North of to America. After inquiring about her mother's response and being assured that it was a favorable one, she agreed. She hadn't been to Paris since she went to school there as a child. Dick then paid her a few compliments and said that she especially intrigued Nicole when they had first seen her. Feeling that she was being passed along to Nicole, Rosemary again told Dick that she had fallen in love with him since the moment she had seen him.

Topic Tracking: Love 4

This put Dick on unfamiliar ground and destroyed the impulsiveness that had made him bring her there, and had made him aware of "the too obvious appeal, the struggle with an unrehearsed scene and unfamiliar words." Book 1, Chapter 8, pg. 39 He tried to make her go back to the house, but he didn't want to lose her interest so he joked with her and paid her a few more compliments as they returned to the terrace where he delivered her to Nicole.

It was soon time to go home and everybody left as the Divers stood side by side in the gate, bidding everyone goodnight by name. Rosemary's thoughts returned to Mrs. McKisco and she wandered what it was that she had seen in the bathroom.

Book 1, Chapter 9

There was only one star in the sky as Brady's chauffeur drove slowly behind the other car. Although they could not clearly see the car, the taillights appeared from time to time. However, after ten minutes the car was pulled up on the side of the road and they passed it and noticed a grinning chauffeur. As soon as they arrived at Gausse's hotel Rosemary fell asleep for three hours. She then awoke and thought of the potential future with Dick, and what it would be like to kiss him. She tried to think of it through her mother's eyes and realized she had much understanding of the world because of her mother. Rosemary had been raised with the idea of work, and her mother had spent everything her husbands had left her on her daughter's education. However, when Rosemary turned sixteen and was as beautiful as she was, her mother took her to see an American producer who was recuperating in France. When the producer went back to New York, they went too.

Since she couldn't sleep, she put on a light gown and went out her window and for a walk along the terrace, where she came upon Luis Campion, who was weeping hard and quietly. After asking him what the matter was, Campion said that it was better to be young and cold than to bear the sorrow that love brings.

Topic Tracking: Love 5

However, he quickly changed the subject and they went down the steps to a bench beside the road after somebody complained about the noise they were making while talking. Mr. Campion then informs her that there is to be a duel between Tommy Barban and Mr. McKisco. He then told her that the whole ordeal started in the car the night before when Violet McKisco was about to say what it was she had seen when she went to the bathroom. However, Tommy Barban told her to stop and threatened anybody who spoke ill of the Divers. The duel was to be in an hour, at five o'clock. All of a sudden, Abe North joined them and insultingly asked Rosemary if Campion had told her what had happened. Campion answered that he told her only what he heard with his own ears, and then he got up and left. Abe sat down and when Rosemary asked him why he treated Campion so badly, he answered that he had been weeping all morning.

Book 1, Chapter 10

Abe told Rosemary that the trouble started at the time the Brady's car passed the Diver's car that had pulled over. Violet McKisco was telling Mrs. Abrams what she had seen at the Diver's when she had gone to the bathroom, but Tommy stopped her. Abe then said that The Divers together is more important to their friends than many of them realize and continued to say "of course it's done at a certain sacrifice - sometimes they seem just rather charming figures in a ballet, and worth the attention you five a ballet, but it's more than that - you'd have to know the story. Anyhow Tommy is one of those men that Dick's passed along to Nicole." Book 1, Chapter 10, pg. 43 As Violet persisted to tell the story, Tommy kept stopping her as if the Divers were sacred and then told her to speak about something else. When she didn't stop, he asked her if she wanted to get out and walk the rest of the way to the hotel, and then told Mr. McKisco to 'shut his wife up'. Mr. McKisco called Tommy a bully, and said that they should have a duel. Being French, Tommy took him up on it and called someone to act as a second, while Mr. McKisco asked Abe to be his second.

When Abe finished telling the story, Rosemary asked if the Divers knew that the duel was about them, to which Abe replied that they didn't and that it was better that way. They then went to see Mr. McKisco, who was no longer drunk, although he had a glass of champagne in his hand. He had been writing and drinking all night, and after asking how much time was left, he gave Abe a letter to give to his wife. He was concerned about how his wife would get back to America, and sad about never finishing his novel. Rosemary advised him that he shouldn't fight a duel, to which he replied that she was right and he should have beat Tommy up when he had the chance. He then continued to say that he couldn't back down because he had suggested the duel and if he backed down then his wife would never respect him again. Rosemary assured him that this wasn't true as Abe pulled out Tommy's pistols so that Mr. McKisco could familiarize himself with them. After discussing the distance for the duel, they all left and when Mr. McKisco asked what would happen if he killed Tommy, Abe answered that he would run him over the Italian border. This was the first thing McKisco had ever really done, as he was one of those people for whom a sensual world did not exist. Abe then told McKisco that there was something he wanted to see him about alone. Rosemary left.

Book 1, Chapter 11

When she went downstairs, she found Campion in the lobby. He asked her if McKisco was all right and when the duel was going to be. Rosemary resented his speaking of it as if it were a circus, and answered that she didn't know when it was going to be. He then asked her if she would go with him, to which she replied that she did not want to go, and that her mother wouldn't like it. As she reentered her room, her mother stirred and asked where she had been. After telling her mother about what had happened, her mother told her told her that she should go see it, but not to sit close to it. She continued to say that she like Rosemary to do things without her, and although Rosemary didn't want to go, she did not dare disobey her mother. She went back downstairs and got in the car with Campion, who had brought his movie camera with him.

Soon, they pulled up into the golf course. McKisco took a swallow of brandy and the principals stood facing each other. Abe stepped forward with a handkerchief in his hand, and Rosemary found herself gritting her teeth with hatred for Barban. As Abe counted to three, they both fired. Then they both swayed but recovered themselves. They had both missed. Barban declared himself unsatisfied, and wanted another shot at a closer distance. However, Abe said that it had all gone far enough, and McKisco returned the pistol to Abe to give to Barban. At this point, Abe asked him if he wanted another shot, and McKisco said that he didn't and that he had been courageous to do it in the first place. To this, Abe replied that he was drunk, and if he couldn't see the difference between being drunk and courageous, then there was no point in getting into it. Before leaving, the doctor asked for payment, and Abe paid while McKisco turned into the bushes and was sick there. The only thing Rosemary could think of was that in a few hours, she would be with Dick again.

Topic Tracking: Sickness 1

Book 1, Chapter 12

Rosemary, the Norths, Dick Diver and two young French musicians were waiting for Nicole at a restaurant. They were judging every man that walked in to see if he had any repose, as Dick had claimed that he was the only American who had some. Dick and Abe bet on the repose of a general that walked in, but Dick won since the general had none. Although they had been in Paris for two days, Rosemary felt that the atmosphere with these people was the same as that when she was at the beach with them. The Divers seemed to know everybody, and yet whenever anybody saw them, it was though they hadn't seen them in a very long time, as they always asked where the Divers kept hiding. Dick made the group he was with feel bright again, and soon Nicole appeared. Rosemary had fun at lunch, and the fact that there were only seven of them made it all the nicer, as she felt that that was the limit of a good party. Rosemary went to make a telephone call, and when she was done she heard two low voices a few feet away from her, on the other side of the row of coats. She recognized them as Dick and Nicole's voices, and they were expressing their love and passion for each other. They agreed to meet at the hotel at four.

Topic Tracking: Love 6

Rosemary was astonished. Although they were married, they always appeared to be cool in their relation to one another, and she was deeply moved by the strong emotions she had just heard. As they continued their day, and she was shopping with Nicole, she saw her in a new light, and thinking through her mother's mind, judged Nicole's attitude about money. Whereas Rosemary spent her money carefully, buying limited items, Nicole shopped for herself and bought everything she liked that she couldn't use for other people, and it seemed as if everybody and everything gave way to her.

Topic Tracking: Money 1

"She illustrated very simple principles, containing in herself her own doom, but illustrated them so accurately that there was grace in the procedure, and presently Rosemary would try to imitate it." Book 1, Chapter 12, pg. 55

It was almost four when Nicole, standing in a shop with a lovebird on her shoulder, had one of her infrequent outbursts of speech. She spoke about how, when she was thirteen and lived in Berlin, just before her mother died, her sister, Beth, was supposed to go to a ball, and had three royal princes on her dance card. Her sister, half an hour before the ball, was suddenly was diagnosed with appendicitis, and the doctor said that she was to be operated on immediately. However, her mother had her plans made and strapped an ice pack to her sister's belly and she went to the ball and danced until two. They operated on her the next day at seven in the morning. Nicole said that it was good to be hard then, and that all nice people were hard, but all Rosemary could think of was that Dick was waiting for Nicole at the hotel. After going to one more store to buy corsages for them both and one for Mary North, Nicole seemed to remember about Dick, and quickly signaled for a taxi and left.

Book 1, Chapter 13

Meeting up with the rest of the group, Dick pointed to a plain and told Rosemary that that land cost twenty lives a foot in the summer of the war. Rosemary was so engrossed in Dick that she would have believed anything he said. Her love had reached a point where she was beginning to be unhappy and desperate. She didn't know what to do and wanted to talk to her mother.

Topic Tracking: Love 7

Dick continued on about the land they were walking past and gave details about certain areas and the war. He and Abe pursued the conversation about the war and threw stones at each other. They soon came to a memorial to the Newfoundland dead and Rosemary burst into tears. Like most women, she liked to be told how she should feel, and liked when Dick told her that she should be sad. After that, they got in the car and headed back to Amiens.

On the way, they passed a sea of graves, and Dick saw the same girl they had previously met on the train, holding the same wreath as before. He asked the chauffeur to stop, and went to speak to her. She was a red-haired girl from Tennessee who had come to lay a memorial on her brother's grave. She was crying, as she believed the War Department had given her the wrong number, as the grave had a different name on it. Dick advised her to lay it on any grave without looking at the name, and told her that that was what her brother would have probably wanted her to do. She did that, and accepted Dick's offer to ride back with them to Amiens. Rosemary cried when she heard of this mishap. It was dark by the time they got to the train station, and the Tennessee girl seemed to have forgotten her sorrows, and was flirting with Dick and Abe, who teased her gently. As they ate sandwiches on the train ride back to Paris, Nicole, biting her lip, was reading the war books Dick had brought along. "Indeed, he had made a quick study of the whole affair, simplifying it always until it bore a faint resemblance to one of his own parties." Book 1, Chapter 13, pg. 59

Book 1, Chapter 14

Upon reaching Paris, Nicole was too tired to continue with the group, and so went back to the hotel. Rosemary realized that when Nicole left, her oppression lifted, and felt that Nicole was like her mother - an incalculable force, and that Nicole was afraid of her. Since reaching Paris, Abe North's eyes had been bloodshot from sun and wine. Rosemary realized that she had started to stop in places much more often to get drinks. She was just starting to consider Mary's quietness when Mary turned to Abe and told him that they would be turning in after the drink in hand. Dick said that they had all better get going after that glass, and commented on how Rosemary said that she didn't drink. To this, she replied that she never said she wasn't going to, and that it was her birthday the day before, so she was celebrating turning eighteen. Dick did not agree that this was the celebration, and said that they were all going to go out the next day to celebrate. Everybody agreed that at eighteen, nothing mattered. Abe said that nothing ever mattered, and that Rosemary should drink more because her lymphatic glands only begin to function at eighteen. Dick said that that was medically incorrect, and Abe retaliated by saying that he would have another hit on Broadway before Dick finished his scientific treatise. Dick joked that he might give it up, and Mary was shocked that he would even joke that way. Then, he and Rosemary left.

Book 1, Chapter 15

In the taxi, Rosemary demanded that Dick tell her what it was he was joking about giving up, and Dick said that he was a doctor of medicine, and that nothing was wrong - he just didn't feel like practicing. Rosemary put her face up as if to be kissed, and Dick responded by rubbing his cheek against hers and telling her that she was a lovely child. She then smiled and told him that she was in love with him and Nicole, and that she couldn't even talk to anybody about him because she didn't want anyone to know how wonderful they were. Dick had heard this many times - even the formula was the same. She then kissed him and lay on his arm and sighed, telling him that she had decided to give him up, since she loved him so much.

Topic Tracking: Love 8

She was now crying, and he consoled her by telling her that she was beautiful and grand, and that everything she did was grand. He kissed her again, without enjoying it. "He knew that there was passion there, but there was no shadow of it in her eyes or on her mouth; there was a faint spray of champagne on her breath. She clung nearer desperately and once more he kissed her and was chilled by the innocence of her kiss, by the glance that at the moment of contact looked beyond him out into the darkness of the night, the darkness of the world." Book 1, Chapter 15, pg. 63

Her room was diagonally across from his, and as a birthday present, she asked Dick to come in for a minute. When he did, she astonished him by telling him to make love to her. He declined by saying that it was the champagne talking, and that they should forget the whole incident. When she insisted, he asked if she had thought about Nicole. To this, she answered that Nicole would never know. When he said that he loved Nicole, she answered by saying that he could love more than one person. Finally, he said that he didn't love her, and when she said that she didn't expect that, he simply stated that she was too young, and that there would be much to teach her.

Topic Tracking: Love 9

He sat down next to her and was confused - not about the ethics of the matter, because it was clearly impossible, but simply confused, and the strength of his balance was suddenly absent. Dick said that they should drop the whole thing out of the picture and left. Rosemary got up and started brushing her hair. She gave it the usual hundred and fifty strokes. Then she gave it another one hundred and fifty strokes. Then she just kept brushing until her arms ached, and then she changed arms and just kept brushing.

Book 1, Chapter 16

Rosemary woke up ashamed. When she looked in the mirror, all she could think of was the boy who had taken her to her Yale prom the year before, and the fact that her mother had forwarded a letter saying that he was in Paris. She then got dressed and went shopping with Nicole. She admired Nicole for her wisdom and beauty, and for the first time in her life, Rosemary felt jealous and felt that she did not measure up to Nicole's beauty. Upon noticing the building she had lived in when she was young, Rosemary pointed it out to Nicole, who thought that was strange because she had spent a winter there when she was twelve. It was at a time when Nicole's family was 'economizing', as was Rosemary's family. However, Rosemary was fully aware that their definitions of 'economizing' were very different.

As they got out of the taxi to meet the others and lunch at the Norths', Rosemary reconstructed herself again. When she saw Dick, their eyes met and everything felt wonderful again. After lunch, they went to Franco-American Films, and were joined by Collis Clay, Rosemary's young man from New Haven; however, she was no longer attracted to him. In the projection room, she sat between Dick and Collis and watched Daddy's Girl. However, when the lights went out, she felt as if she were alone with Dick. The movie portrayed her in utmost youth and innocence, and Dick was astounded by the sincerity of her character and applauded, telling her that she would be one of the best actresses on the screen.

After watching the movie, Rosemary announced that she had arranged a screen test for Dick. Everyone was shocked, and Dick kindly refused the test, saying that pictures make a fine career for women, but that he was an old scientist wrapped up in his private life. They then decided to go to tea, but everybody was busy except for Rosemary and Dick. Taking Collis, to drop him off, they mounted a taxi, where Rosemary told Dick that she had wanted him to take the test because if it turned out well, then she would take him back with her to California. Dick was overwhelmed and said that that was incredibly sweet. At this point, Collis interrupted and spoke of how he had seen the picture four times, and that in New Haven everyone was in love with Rosemary. However, he was soon gone, and soon after, Dick and Rosemary arrived at their destination. Dick then asked Rosemary if she wanted to go in, and Rosemary said that she didn't care. Dick said that they had to because on of the ladies inside wanted to buy pictures from a friend of his who needed the money. However, he warned Rosemary that she wouldn't like the people, and told her that they would only stay for five minutes.

Topic Tracking: Money 2

Book 1, Chapter 17

The outside of the house looked very historical. However, upon entering, Rosemary found that it was very modern inside. There were about thirty people, mostly women, dressed in high fashion. There were two types of people: the Americans and English, who had been there all summer and were quiet at times, and explosive at others; and the 'exploiters', who were sober, serious people with no time for fun. The latter class kept their balance best in this environment, and set it's tone.

Topic Tracking: English 1

Rosemary and Dick were separated almost immediately upon entering, and Rosemary was absorbed by a conversation three young women were having, and so moved closer toward them. They were discussing how good of a show was put on by the Divers, and how Dick used the same lines with every person. Furthermore, they didn't like Nicole or Abe, but admitted that Dick could be one of the most charming people. Rosemary looked around for Dick, and found him with the hostess. Their eyes met, and he nodded slightly. Suddenly, the three women noticed her, and stared at her critically. She looked back at them, letting them know that she knew that they had seen her and that she had heard them, and then walked over to Dick. Dick immediately excused himself, and they left. They agreed that it was a terrible place to be, and got into the taxi. They started kissing, and Rosemary exclaimed that she didn't know what came over her the night before, and that it must have been the champagne. Dick dismissed this, and said that she had simply said that she loved him, and they continued kissing, until the turn before the hotel.

Dick then told Rosemary that although he loved her, there was nothing they could do about it, and that Nicole must never find out. After Rosemary said that nothing matters, as long as he loves her, he continued to say that Nicole must not suffer, and that he also loved Nicole and she loved him.

Topic Tracking: Love 10

Rosemary understood - it was about not hurting people. However, Dick continued further to say that what was between him and Nicole was active love - more complicated than he could tell Rosemary, and that it was responsible for the crazy duel. Rosemary was surprised that Dick knew about the duel as they had agreed not to talk about it, but Dick said that Abe could never keep a secret, and that he had told him. Dick then walked Rosemary to her room, and went back downstairs to make arrangements for the evening. Meanwhile, Rosemary wrote a letter to her mother, and was surprised that she did not miss her at all.

Book 1, Chapter 18

Dick threw a wonderful party that evening, and there were many people that Rosemary did not know. However, the fact that Dick was there was comforting. "The enthusiasm, the selflessness behind the whole performance ravished her, the technic of moving many varied types, each as immobile, as dependent on supplies of attention as an infantry battalion as dependent on rations, appeared so effortless that he still had pieces of his own most personal self for everyone" Book 1, Chapter 18, pg. 77 She was remembering the times that she was happiest with Dick when Mary said that she had to take Abe home because his boat train left at eleven the next morning. Then, Dick stated that he and Nicole were going home, and asked Rosemary if she wanted to go with them. However, she had already promised Mary that she would stay with them, or Abe would never go to bed. Dick then told Mary not to let Rosemary go home alone, as he felt responsible for her mother. Then, he left. Later, Rosemary, the Norths, and some other people were riding on top of thousands of carrots in a market wagon, and were throwing the carrots at each other. Later, when she was homeward bound and thinking that she had finally been to a wild party, she realized that it wasn't fun when Dick wasn't there.

Book 1, Chapter 19

Abe left from the station at eleven. Just as he was wondering whether he had time for a drink before he left, he noticed Nicole, who was very self-revelatory in her expressions, as she felt unobserved. She was frowning, but upon seeing Abe, the mood passed off her face. She quickly told him that she was only there because he had asked her to come. Abe seemed to have forgotten why he asked her to come, and Nicole seemed content to look at the passers-by. She noticed a woman wearing a dress with extra material, and became very emotional, talking about the dress and the story behind it faster and faster.

Suddenly, she stopped talking and realized that she had said too much for her. Then, Abe began to talk - he said that he had not had fun seeing them this trip, and that he was tired of them. He continued to say that if he had any enthusiasm, he would go on to find new people. Nicole slapped him, and said that it was foolish of him to be unpleasant and that he didn't mean what he had just said. In response, he said that maybe he was just bored, and tired of women's worlds and of friends. The thing to have, he said, was sycophants. The station was filling up, and Nicole noticed a girl she knew dropping letters into a mail-slot, and said she had to speak to her. Abe followed Nicole's gaze, and recognized the girl as someone he had seen around Paris. The woman turned as if to greet Nicole, and Nicole approached her. Then, the girl turn around and left. Nicole returned to the table just as Abe was about to go and get a drink. Abe and Nicole started arguing again, but Rosemary and Mary came into sight.

They stood in a group made uncomfortable by Abe's sober presence. Dick appeared soon and pulled them out of the situation, changing the subject. Some Americans were saying goodbyes, as new people came on to the station. Nicole, meanwhile, was noticing something else, and grabbed Dick's arm, pointing to the woman she had earlier seen. The woman was quickly running away from the man she was talking to, and plunging frantically into her purse, pulled out a revolver and shot someone twice. Simultaneously, the train began to move, and Abe, oblivious to what had happened, waved from the window. The target was sitting down on the platform and the crowd was forming. The crowd then split in two - one half following the man as he was being carried away on the stretcher and the other following the girl. Dick left the group for a few minutes and came back to say that the girl was Maria Wallis, the man was an Englishman who it was difficult to identify since she had shot him through his identification card, and that he would go with her to the police station. Nicole objected and said that the girl's sister lived in Paris and that they should simply call her. Dick said that he should go because he didn't want them to do anything outrageous to her.

However, he was unconvinced and also wanted to show off for Rosemary. Nicole then told him to wait, and went to call Laura, Maria's sister. Meanwhile, Rosemary realized that Dick liked to help everybody, just like her mother. When she voiced this, the mention of her mother annoyed Dick rather than amused him, and he found himself wanting to sweep her away from her mother. However, this urge made him realize that he had somewhat lost control, and he reestablished himself immediately. Nicole and Rosemary were both shocked by what had happened, and were waiting for Dick to make a moral comment on the matter, but he was too shaken by his own emotions to resolve things, and so the women slipped into vague unhappiness.

Although they pretended that nothing had happened, for Rosemary, everything had happened: Abe had left, Mary was planning to leave that afternoon for Salzburg, and thus the time in Paris had ended. Furthermore, "the shots had entered into all their lives: echoes of violence followed them out onto the pavement where two porters held a post-mortem beside them as they waited for a taxi."Book 1, Chapter 19, pg. 85

Book 1, Chapter 20

After lunch, Rosemary had cramps and felt fretful. Dick was also unhappy and the subsequent increase of egotism tended momentarily to blind him to what was going on around him. After Mary left for her train, Rosemary too got up to leave to go to the studio, where she was meeting with some people. However, before leaving, she asked the remaining company to tell Collis that she couldn't wait and for him to call her the next day. Nicole was angry and told Rosemary to leave the message with a waiter as they were leaving immediately.

As soon as Rosemary left, Dick noticed a flash of unhappiness of Nicole's mouth. It was so small that anybody but him could have missed it, and he could have pretended not to see it. He wandered what Nicole was thinking. Rosemary was one of many people he had 'worked over' in the past years, and Nicole knew how these people interpreted his interest and enthusiasm; but she also knew that except for when their children were being born, Dick had not spent a night away from her since their marriage. There was a moment of silence before Collis appeared. As soon as he sat, Nicole left. However, Dick sat with Collis as he liked him, and he listen passively as Collis rambled on. Dick's attention was soon caught by the subject matter of which Collis was speaking - Rosemary. Collis was saying how when he first met Rosemary, he thought that she was very cold, but after a certain incident, he changed his mind. What had happened was that on the train from New York to Chicago one Easter, Rosemary had a compartment with one of Collis's cousins, but she wanted to be alone with Bill Hillis, one of his friends, so she and Bill went into a compartment by themselves. Two hours later, Collis went back and found Rosemary and Bill arguing with the conductor - Rosemary white as a sheet. What had happened was that they had locked the door and pulled down the blinds, and Collis said that while some 'heavy stuff' must have been happening, the conductor went around to pick up the tickets. They thought that it was Collis joking around with them and knocking on the door, so they wouldn't let him in at first, and when they did, he was very angry.

Dick suddenly felt a change within him, caused by the thought of a third person with Rosemary. He could vividly picture every minute of the story, including Bill asking Rosemary if she would mind if he pulled the curtain down. Whereas the story had no impression on Collis, except that it proved to him that Rosemary was 'human', Dick realized that Collis was in love with Rosemary.

Topic Tracking: Love 11

Dick went to the bank, and wrote a check; however, he was unsure who to ask to cash the check, as he had ties with each of the tellers. He finally decided on the youngest one, as he would only have to put on a small show. He first went to the mail desk, and picked up his mail, where there were several letters for him, three for Nicole, and one for Rosemary. However, he could not get the picture of Bill asking Rosemary if he could pull down the curtain out of his mind. By the time he reached the teller, the person he wanted to present his check to was busy, so he approached the one who would, and did, make conversation about mutual friends that Dick hadn't spoken to for twelve years.

Dick got into a taxi and was uncertain of what he wanted to do since he was so shocked by what had happened in the last forty-eight hours. He told the taxi to take him to Rosemary's studio, and yet when there, he tried his best to make sure she didn't see him. He knew that this was out of character with everything he had done in his life, and was a turning point.

Book 1, Chapter 21

Dick did not want to see anyone. However, as he paced the street, a thin-faced, thirty year old American approached him. Dick placed him, and the man starting asking him questions, such as where he was from and the like. Dick answered the questions courteously, and then asked the man why he had so much time to waste. The man said he was in Paris on business - his line of business was selling papers, but he was in that area because he wanted to audition for the part of the guy who could speak English in the nearby American movie theater.

Topic Tracking: English 2

Dick shook of the gentleman and, realizing that Rosemary was not around, found a telephone and called her. He told her that he had come to meet her at her studio and she wasn't there. She said that she had only stayed for a minute. Dick then confessed that he was in a strange position with her, as things get difficult when a child can disturb a middle-aged man. However, he said that he would like to be with her right then, and Rosemary said that she would also like to be with him. Dick's mind wandered back to the scene between her and Bill. They hung up and Rosemary returned to writing the letter to her mother.

At six, Dick called Nicole, and they made plans to have dinner and then go see a play. It was a tradition between them that they should never be too tired for anything. On their way out, they knocked softly at Rosemary's door, but there was no answer.

Book 1, Chapter 22

A knock on the door woke Nicole up late the next morning. A police sergeant came in and asked if Abe North was there, and Nicole replied that he had left the prior morning to America. The sergeant shook his head and said that he had been seen in Paris the prior night. Nicole responded that that was peculiar because they had seen him off on the boat train. The sergeant reconfirmed that he had been seen there this morning, and said that his identification card had been found. Nicole replied by saying she knew nothing about it. The sergeant then said that they had arrested the Negro that had robbed Abe, and that Abe should come to identify him. When he left, Nicole got dressed and called Rosemary's room. There was no answer. She was hoping to hear from Dick. Meanwhile, she called the hotel registry, and found that Abe had registered at six-thirty that morning. As she was about to leave the room, the telephone range, and the office announced that Mr. Crawshow, a Negro, was there to see Abe, and that he was a friend of the Divers. He said that Mr. Freeman was unjustly put into prison. Nicole disclaimed everything, hung up the receiver, and left.

She ran into Rosemary at the dressmakers, and they shopped together. Again, Rosemary noticed that she and Nicole spent money in very different ways. Whereas Nicole was sure the money was hers, Rosemary spent money as if it had been lent to her and she had to be careful where she spent it. Rosemary admired Nicole's way of spending.

Topic Tracking: Money 3

When they returned to the hotel, they found Dick there. He had received a phone call from Abe, who had spent most of the morning in hiding. Apparently, Dick had launched a 'race riot', and wanted to get Freeman out of jail. He was back in Paris because he had reached Evreux by train, but wanted to compare the plane ride to Paris with that to St. Sulpice. Nicole told Rosemary what a gentleman Abe used to be, but the alcohol tore him apart.

Dick was feeling increasingly resentful by the hour. He was not used to self-indulgence, and was wondering if Nicole could guess his emotions. He was not sure, as the prior night, she had referred to Rosemary as a child. They then went down for lunch, and carefully studied the party sitting next to them. However, Dick could not stop thinking about Bill asking Rosemary if he could pull down the curtain.

Book 1, Chapter 23

Abe North was still at the Ritz bar, where he had been since nine in the morning. He had left for a little while to the barber to be shaved, but came right back. When he returned, Paul, the famous concessionaire, was there, and he sat down to speak to Abe. Abe told him that he was supposed to leave Paris the prior morning to, but didn't because the next installment of the Liberty was due in Paris, and if he missed it, he would have never read it.

At one o'clock, the bar was full, and in the confusion, Abe had lost his seat and so began involving himself in random peoples' conversations. At four, the chasseur approached him and asked if he wanted to see a colored man by the name of Jules Peterson. Abe was distraught and asked how Jules had found him. The chasseur answered that he had been to all the American bars and hotels. Abe asked him to tell Jules that he was not there, and then asked if Jules was even allowed to come in. In response to this question, Paul shook his head and said he couldn't allow it. Abe got up and went outside.

Book 1, Chapter 24

Carrying his miniature leather briefcase, Dick left a note for Maria, signed 'Dicole', the word with which he and Nicole signed communication letters in the first days of love. He then went to the hotel, where he found the halls to be unnaturally light. When he left, he realized that it was because although it was only four o'clock, it was already dark outside.

Rosemary opened her door full of confused emotions, and found Dick there. She saw him as some stability, as younger people are inclined to do with those older than them. He noticed the wet footprints near the bathroom door, as she had just taken a shower. He put his things down, and told her to sit on his lap. She did so, and they began to kiss. The rain suddenly stopped and the sun came out, and he pointed this out to Rosemary. She responded that they were such actors, and went over to her dresser. There was suddenly a persistent knock on the door that shocked them both; and Dick pretended to have been asking Rosemary if she wanted to go out with them as he opened the door. However, the precautions were unnecessary as it was Abe who was knocking. He quickly introduced Mr. Peterson and said that Mr. Peterson was in a terrible situation and it was his fault. They all went to the Diver's suite.

It appeared that Jules had been a legal witness to a dispute that morning, and had accompanied Abe to the police station to support his assertion that a thousand-franc note had been seized out of his hand by a Negro whose identification was one of the points in the case. Abe and Mr. Peterson had returned to the bar with the police and identified the wrong Negro, who had entered the bar after Abe had left. The true culprit had only just returned to the scene. Abe had successfully managed to anger many people, and had then managed to evade all of them, except for Jules Peterson, who was in an odd position because he had helped a white man. Jules was a small manufacturer of shoe polish, and was driven out of Stockholm because his formula was too good. Abe asked Dick to help Jules. Dick told Abe to go and get some sleep, and when he sobered up, Mr. Peterson would come and see him. Abe refused, and Jules said that he would go and wait in the hall because it is probably difficult for them to discuss his matter in front of him. Abe asked Dick where the drinks were, and Dick said that he didn't have any. Abe was extremely drunk, and Dick told him to leave immediately and come back later if he wanted. Abe left.

Book 1, Chapter 25

As soon as he left, Dick and Rosemary embraced again, and then Rosemary said that she had to leave, and "made an exit that she had learned young, and on which no director had ever tried to improve." Book 1, Chapter 25, pg. 109 She went to her room and directly to her dresser where she had left her wristwatch. She slipped it on and finished the sentence that she had started in the letter to her mother. Then, without turning around, she noticed that she wasn't alone in the room. When she did turn around, she saw that a dead Negro was stretched on her bed, and she let out a scream. Dick was tidying up the room, and Nicole had come in and was throwing away one of Abe's extraordinary ashtrays when Rosemary burst in. She screamed Dick's name and told him to come with her and see. Dick felt the pulse and noticed that the blood was on the blanket and had seeped through to the mattress. He closed the door, but then heard footsteps and Nicole calling his name. He told her to go and bring their comforter and top blanket, and not to let anyone see her. He stripped the same materials off Rosemary's bed and exchanged them quickly with Nicole in the hallway. He quickly assessed the situation and realized that the hostile Negro had tracked Mr. Peterson down and when he found him in the corridor, Mr. Peterson had tried to take refuge in Rosemary's room, but to no avail. He also realized that if the situation was left as it were, it would look like it was Rosemary's fault, and her career would not have a chance. Dick grabbed the body and placed it in a plausible position in the corridor. Then, he went back to his suite and called the owner of the hotel.

All his pleasantness toward the hotel owner was finally paying off. Dick said that they came out of their suite and came upon a dead Negro in the hallway, and that the reason he was calling was so that no other guests see it. He asked that his name be kept out of it, and that it was simply out of consideration for the hotel that he must inform him. The body was soon gone, and Dick and Rosemary returned to the Diver's suite in search of Nicole. They heard inhuman sounds coming from the bathroom, and walked in thinking that Nicole had fallen and hurt herself. Instead, when they walked in, they found Nicole rocking and crying and she shouted at Dick that he she never expected him to love her, but to give her privacy in the bathroom - the only place she can be alone.

Topic Tracking: Love 12

She continued by saying that it was him and the bloody spread that were intruding on her, him asking her to fix them all the time.

Rosemary, back in their room, stood, realizing what Violet McKisco had seen in the bathroom the night of the party. The phone rang, and she almost cried with relief when she heard Collis' voice. She asked him to come up while she got her hat, since she was afraid to go into her room alone.

Book 2, Chapter 1

Dick arrived in Zurich, Switzerland in the spring of 1917 at age 26. He avoided having to take part in the war because he was working towards his degree. Sick and injured men were still visibly present in Switzerland, and posters and other reminders of the war still remained. The pride that the Swiss first felt about their part in the war was fading as the killing continued.

Topic Tracking: Sickness 2

The Swiss were more surprised than anyone at the United States' entry into the war.

Dr. Diver was an Oxford Rhodes scholar who received a degree from John Hopkins. After this, he went to Vienna to continue his studies. Here he wrote pamphlets that he used in a book he published in Zurich in 1920. Dr. Diver's charming, affectionate nature earned him the nickname, "Lucky Dick." Since coal was scarce in 1917, he had to burn textbooks for fuel. Dr. Diver shared an apartment with Ed Elkins, who was the second secretary at the Embassy and an intellectual. Elkins spoke of Dick, "And Lucky Dick can't be one of those clever men; he must be less intact, even faintly destroyed. If life won't do it for him it's not a substitute to get a disease, or a broken heart, or an inferiority complex, though it'd be nice to build out some broken side till it was better than the original structure." Book 2, Chapter 1, pg. 116 Dick believed that Elkins was incomplete. After Dick received his degree in Zurich, he received orders to join a neurological unit forming in Bar-Sur-Aube. He did not enjoy his work in France and returned to Zurich in 1919.

Book 2, Chapter 2

It was a damp April day in Zurich when Dick went to see Franz Gregorovius, a resident pathologist at Dohmler's clinic. Franz asked Dick about his experiences in the war and if he came to see "that girl", Nicole, who happened to be one of Franz's patients. Dick told Franz that he only saw the girl once, but that she was "the prettiest thing" he ever saw. This girl sent fifty letters to Dick in a span of 8 months. Earlier letters seemed pathological in nature, while more recent letters seemed normal.

The examples of Nicole's letters to Captain Diver showed her fluctuation between insanity and sanity. The first letters were apologetic and nonsensical. She says that Dr. Diver has a "cat's face." In one of her letters she said, "They said that you are a doctor, but so long as you are a cat it is different. My head aches so, so excuse this walking there like a ordinary with a white cat will explain, I think." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 122 Nicole kept referring to her sickness, and she repeatedly wrote, "excuse all this". She told him about her experiences with doctors, and how she wanted to leave the institution in Chicago. Some of the letters were desperate, with Nicole pleading for Dr. Diver to help her with her mental problems.

Topic Tracking: Sickness 3

After a month of receiving no letters, Dr. Diver began to receive letters which seemed sane and normal. Her later letters read, "I am slowly coming back to life...I wish someone were in love with me like boys were ages ago before I was sick. I suppose it will be years, though, before I could think of anything like that." Book 2, Chapter 2, pg. 124

Topic Tracking: Sickness 4
Topic Tracking: Love 13

If he did not return the letter promptly, however, Nicole became worried. Franz returned and told Dick that he has been waiting to tell him about Nicole.

Book 2, Chapter 3

Dr. Dohmler's correspondence with Mr. Devereux Warren in Chicago allowed him to meet Mr. Warren's daughter, Nicole, who was 16 at the time. Mr. Warren spoke to Dr. Dohmler (in German) about helping his daughter, Nicole with her mental illness. Mr. Warren became emotional as he told him that Nicole's mother died when she was only 11, but other than Nicole's childhood was normal and happy. Mr. Warren also said that he noticed Nicole's insanity eight or so months ago when she implied that their valet was making advances towards her. Doctor Dohmler daydreamt about what it would be like to have a clinic in Chicago as he listened to Mr. Warren. Mr. Warren went on to say that Nicole's sister started writing down the insane things that Nicole was saying about men trying to attack her.

After speaking with Nicole, Dr. Dohmler and Franz diagnosed her a schizophrenic, with fear of men as a symptom. Mr. Warren reluctantly came back to speak with Dr. Dohmler, even though he had been planning to return to America. Mr. Warren broke down into tears and admitted the truth: "We were just like lovers--and then all at once we were lovers--and ten minutes after it happened I could have shot myself--except I guess I'm such a Goddamned degenerate I didn't have the nerve to do it." Book 2, Chapter 3, pg. 129 Mr. Warren went on to say that this did not occur repeatedly. Upon hearing this, Dr. Dohmler told Mr. Warren to see him in the morning, and then he suggested that they go to Chicago.

Book 2, Chapter 4

Franz told Warren that he would take on his case if he agreed to stay away from Nicole for at least five years. Franz and Dick discussed Nicole's condition as seen in the letters. Dick had answered Nicole's letters, giving her a chance to think of somebody outside. When Nicole went to boarding school, she developed the idea that all men were evil as a way of protecting herself.

Dr. Dohmler, Franz, and Dick all analyzed Nicole's letters. Dick said that her recent letters are hopeful and romantic. They discussed Dick's feelings towards Nicole. When Franz asked Dick what he plans to do, Dick told Franz that his main goal is to become a great psychologist. Dick was content to remain in France because he still received military pay, and he had a job offer at Gisler's Clinic in Interlaken. Franz advised Dick against taking this job. Dick started to think about his life and wondered: "God, am I like the rest after all?" Book 2, Chapter 4, pg. 133 He thought about how he wanted to be good and wise and loved.

Topic Tracking: Love 14

Book 2, Chapter 5

"Miss Warren", Nicole, entered the room with her Senora, and introduced him to Dick. The Senora commented on the nice weather and suggested that Dick stay in Zurich through the summer. Dick and Nicole went on a walk outside and talked about music, as Dick marveled at Nicole's youthful beauty. Nicole told Dick that she wanted to play the phonograph for him. She kept looking at him and smiling, and this excited Dick. The two met a week later at Franz's house.

Now they were in America and Nicole played the phonograph and sang to Dick. Nicole kept looking at Dick and smiling. She sang one song that her cook taught her, "A woman never knows/ What a good man she's got/ Till after she turns him down." Book 2, Chapter 5, pg. 136 Dick commented about how he knew few songs. He thought to himself about how he had little experience with women.

Book 2, Chapter 6

The next time Dick and Nicole saw each other was in May. Dick said men look at her because of her elaborate clothing. Nicole found herself both beautiful and rich. Dick moved back to Zurich during the first week of summer to work on his revision of "A Psychology for Psychiatrists." Dick believed that it will be published. He commented on his profession and said that, "The weakness of the profession is its attraction for the man a little crippled and broken." Book 2, Chapter 6, pg. 137 Dick considered himself to be one of these men, while he felt that Franz was chosen by fate to be a psychiatrist. Franz thought that Dick was oversimplifying things. They discussed the fact that Dick liked Nicole and that Nicole was possibly in love with Dick.

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Dick and Franz went to see Professor Dohmler and Dohmler questioned the relationship between Dick and Nicole. Dohmler thought it best if the two did not see each other, and suggested that one of them go away. Franz said that he did not think it was necessary for either of them to go away. Dick then admitted that he was half in love with Nicole and that he had thought of marrying her. Franz interrupted and said that they would be doomed to fail, and that he might as well never see her again. Dick agreed.

Topic Tracking: Love 16

Book 2, Chapter 7

Dick was thinking about what to do about Nicole. He and the other doctors decided that he must separate himself from her, yet still be kind to her. As they were talking, Nicole appeared suddenly in the rain. She told him that her sister, Beth is coming to take her away somewhere. Dick told her that she is going to be happy. The two were fascinated by one another and they constantly examined each other. Nicole said that she has learned a lot about language and music by being in the institution. Dick was envious at her accomplishments, and told her that all he is interested in is his work. Dick then told her that she was better and that she should go to America and fall in love and have a family. Nicole said that she did not think she would be ready to marry anyone for a long time.

Dick was visibly upset that Nicole was leaving, and she was unhappy as well. "Nicole's world had fallen to pieces, but it was only a flimsy and scarcely created world." Book 2, Chapter 7, pg. 143 The next day, Nicole kept her distance from Dick. Dick and Franz spoke about how Nicole has been upset and "in the clouds" after Dick and Nicole's discussion. Nicole apparently understood that Dick was trying to distance himself from her.

Book 2, Chapter 8

Dick had been feeling upset over the few prior weeks and he had been dreaming about Nicole. One day he saw Nicole out with her sister and she looked at him like she was frightened. Dick tried to get a handle on the situation by writing himself a memorandum, but he could not deny that his emotions were still involved. Dick observed a few things about the attitudes the English had towards the Swiss--they seemed to be suspicious of them because of their association with the Germans, and they commented on how their cable cars are superior to those in Switzerland and Germany. Obviously, ill will still existed from the war. Dick took his bicycle and rode the cable car up the mountain.

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In the car, he ran into Nicole and a Latin-looking young man, Conte de Marmora. Nicole flirted with both men. Marmora fought for Nicole's attention by suggesting that he throw her around so that she would fall like a feather. Dick noticed "the delight on Nicole's face--to be a feather again instead of a plummet, to float and not to drag." Book 2, Chapter 8, pg. 149 The sunny day and fresh air seemed to parallel Nicole's new found health and happiness. Dick wanted to stay at a different hotel so that he would not have to see Nicole, but he agreed to drop by their hotel after dinner. When Dick settled in to his own hotel, he started to think about the feeling that he and Nicole had for one another.

Book 2, Chapter 9

Dick arrived at the hotel to meet Nicole, Mamora, and both of their families. Dick thought that the Mamora's fortune had something to do with a bank in Milan that had something to do with the Warrens' fortunes. Baby Warren (Beth) paid special attention to Dick and asked him for advice on what to do about Nicole. Baby told him that she could not tell if Nicole was acting eccentric or crazy. Dick assured her that Nicole's recent behavior had been normal. Baby then told Dick that she had a plan to move Nicole to the south side of Chicago, where old Chicago families live, and where Nicole could fall in love with a nice doctor. Dick laughed at her suggestion that the Warrens could buy Nicole a doctor.

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Meanwhile, Nicole had disappeared and Baby was worried. Dick went to find her and he saw her outside looking out at the lake. Nicole said the music was too much for her and she wanted to get away. Dick told Nicole that he liked her, and fumbling, Nicole asked him if she was the type of girl Dick might have dated. When Dick made a joke, Nicole flared up at him, telling him that she had common sense now and she said, "And if I don't know you're the most attractive man I ever met you must think I am still crazy. It's my hard luck, all right--but don't pretend that I don't know--I know everything about you and me." Book 2, Chapter 9, pg. 154 Dick then told Nicole that he couldn't fall in love with her and Nicole said that he never gave her a chance. She asked Dick for a chance, and they kissed.

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Nicole walked away feeling confident that Dick was hers. Dick followed her, they kissed again, and a storm began.

Dick found two notes in his hotel the next afternoon. The first note was from Nicole, telling him that she had no regrets about the other night. The next note was from Beth, asking if he could accompany Nicole back as far as Zurich and drop her at the sanitarium. Dick was upset because he thought Beth was trying to set him up with Nicole, but in fact, he was not the kind of doctor that Beth wanted in the family. Dick accompanied Nicole on the train and they sadly parted.

Book 2, Chapter 10

In September, Dick had tea with Beth in Zurich. They discussed Dick's relationship with Nicole. Beth wanted to make sure that Dick was not trying to marry Nicole just because she is rich. Beth suggested that Dick was not suitable for her, and referred to the differing social status of the two families.

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Nicole entered and said that she and Dick were in love, that he was going to take care of her, and the two would live simply, without all of her money. She then, however, accepted her family's money so that she could maintain her lifestyle. She wanted the nicer apartment, and then she wanted to spend her money so that they could have a house. She rambled about her travels with Dick--they traveled all over the world that year.

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Some time passes. Nicole had two children, and after her second child, Topsy, she started to go crazy again. Nicole talked about how work is everything and knowledge is important. She mentioned her friend Mary, and Tommy who was in love with her.

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She went on about how she pretended to be other people. Nicole noticed that Dick and Tommy do not like each other. She mentiond how Rosemary was beautiful.

Book 2, Chapter 11

Dick was talking to Elsie Speers about his travels in Africa. Rosemary, Elsie's daughter, had written to Elsie saying that Nicole seemed insane. Dick quickly told her that Nicole is all right now and he changed the subject. Elsie told him that Rosemary was in love with him and that he was the only man that she had ever cared about. Dick told her that he was in love with Rosemary.

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He then went back to his workroom at Villa Diana to work on his book. He thought about his wasted years at New Haven and the growing luxury that the Divers lived in and their need to display it.

Dick saw Nicole in the garden and he started thinking. He thought about how he has to protect her and make her believe that everything is normal. He remembered how he had to hold her in Paris, and how they had to leave Rosemary. Nicole's behavior in Paris signaled a new cycle of her illness. On the train ride to the French Riviera, Nicole watched Dick intently. They spoke about whether Rosemary would be all right. Dick seemed to be on the defensive, and disagreed with Nicole's comments about how pretty and smart Rosemary is. Dick tried to forget about Rosemary so that he would not be upset. He thought about some of Nicole's recent acts of insanity. Both of them were wounded inside. His heart had become somewhat hardened towards her and, "As an indifference cherished, or left to atrophy, becomes an emptiness, to this extent he had learned to become empty of Nicole, serving her against his will with negations and emotional neglect." Book 2, Chapter 11, pg. 168

Book 2, Chapter 12

Dick returned his attention to Nicole in the garden. He told her that he met with Mrs. Speers and that she had said goodbye. He told her that he also saw Bartholomew Tailor, a rival in his field, and how they were pleasant to one another. He compared their meeting to a meeting between Sigmund Freud and Ward McAllister. Dick started to think about work, and then realized that he wanted to go play the piano. He played a familiar tune, and he hoped that Nicole would recognize it from the fortnight.

Dick looked around the house that Nicole's grandfather had paid for and thought to himself how he, himself, did not need to live extravagantly. It was very important to Dick for him to pay his share of everything. Nicole had rejected the simple arrangement they had made in Zurich and spent money extravagantly. Dick felt that his work was not as important because Nicole made more money than he did.

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In addition, he felt that he had to walk on eggshells around Nicole. By December, Nicole had been acting normal for about a month, and she and Dick headed to the Swiss Alps for Christmas.

Book 2, Chapter 13

Dick saw Nicole and Beth in their ski suits from across the room. Nicole's face lit up when she saw Dick. Beth, who was now almost 30, had brought two Englishman along with her.

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Beth told Dick of a property of their mother's that had been sold and asked him if he knew how to invest Nicole's share of the money.

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Dick avoided the question and went to meet Franz, who is now 40. Franz told Dick of his plan to open a clinic with him in the old clinic of Braun on the Zurgersee. Franz goes on to tell Dick that he would only have to work in the clinicc for a half a year, and he could spend the other months in France or America working on his book. Franz told him he would need some money from Dick to get started.

Beth was eavesdropping on their conversation, so Dick started to include her in the conversation. Dick told Franz that he didn't have that much money, and that he hadn't been able to get his hands on any of Nicole's money. Beth liked the possibility of Nicole living close to a mental clinic and told Dick that he and she should think it over. Dick really felt like she was saying: "We own you, and you'll admit it sooner or later. It is absurd to keep up the pretense of independence." Book 2, Chapter 13, pg. 177 Dick resents Beth's "cold rich insolence".

Topic Tracking: Money 8

Dick told Beth that he there is too much good manners. He said that, "Good manners are an admission that everybody is so tender that they have to be handled with gloves. Now, human respect--you don't call a man a coward or a liar lightly, but if you spend your life sparing people's feelings and feeding their vanity, you get so you can't distinguish what should be respected in them." Book 2, Chapter 13, pg. 178 Dick, Beth, and the Englishmen engaged in a discussion about manners, and Dick patronized one of the Englishman.

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Nicole went to bed, angry that Dick would not listen to Beth. Dick thought Baby was a "trivial, selfish woman." As Franz was leaving, Dick agreed to start the clinic with him, keeping in mind Nicole's condition.

Book 2, Chapter 14

Dick woke up from his dream about the war. Dick had turned 38 and he had been working at the clinic for 18 months. The clinic was modern and had the beauty of a country club. Dick awoke after having a dream about war and heard Nicole mumble in her sleep. He thought about how the years slipped away for Nicole, about how she was lonely, and about how she felt she owned Dick even though he did not want to be owned. Dick did think that Nicole has the capacity for truly loving their children. Dick tried a few times to let go of his hold on her, but he would always go back.

Dick's son, Lanier, admired his father for starting the clinic. Dick, in turn, admired his son and devoted much time to him. Lanier watched his father shave and asked him curious questions. Dick described the decorations in the clinic-beadwork, brass, and colors and designs in a circle.

Dick thought that most of the patients liked him better than Dr. Gregorovius. Dick also thought about one of his patients, an English woman, who spoke to him about the music at the clinic. Dick asked her when she was going to play something for all of them, even though he knew she did not know how to play anything.

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Nicole took great care in her decorations in the houses in Eglantine and Beeches in the clinic. She used her imagination to its fullest capacity and she referred to herself as "the master plumber." Dick thought about his experience with one of his female patients who used to be pretty, but now suffered from hallucinations. Franz had tried to hypnotize her, but this did not cure her. Dick did not believe in hypnosis. The woman told Dick that she felt as if she had gone to battle. The woman did not think that he could do anything for her. Dick thought about this woman, and some of his other patients and wonders if he really could do anything to help any of them.

Book 2, Chapter 15

Dick arrived home from the clinic to find a letter sent to Nicole from a discharged patient accusing him of seducing her daughter. Dick had kissed the girl, but he rejected her further advances at him. Dick told Nicole that the letter was not true, but she did not believe him. They got into the car with their children and drive in silence to a carnival. Nicole began to act up and Dick found himself once again torn between acting as her doctor and acting as her husband. Nicole ran off and Dick followed her and found her on the top of a Ferris wheel. They fought about the girl in the letter and Nicole accused Dick of calling her delusional any time she saw something that he did not want her to see. Nicole begged Dick to help her. Dick told her that he could only help her in the same way that he always had. This time Dick wanted Nicole to cure herself.

They found the children and left, and everyone in the car was somber. Nicole was screaming at Dick in the car and she caused him to get into a car accident. When Nicole got out of the car she was laughing hysterically. Dick sent the children to a nearby inn to tell someone to come down and help them. The innkeeper came down and noticed that they would have gone straight down the hill if the tree hadn't stopped them. Dick told Emile not to worry about the car, and that they would wait for the chauffeur.

Book 2, Chapter 16

Dick told Franz that he wanted to go away for a month without Nicole to the Psychiatric Conference in Berlin. Dick got on a plane for Munich with no intention of going to the conference, although he imagined what the conference would be like. There would be Americans, Latins, those who supported Freud's ideas, Jung, and other Europeans. The Americans and Europeans would discuss their ideas, each wanting to appear superior. Dick examined the villages along the way and spent time with people in the churches. This reminded him of sitting in his father's church in Buffalo. Dick spoke to an Englishman, feeling that, "England was like a rich man after a disastrous orgy who makes up to the household by chatting with them individually, when it is obvious to them that he is only trying to get back his self-respect in order to usurp his former power." Book 2, Chapter 16, pg. 195

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He read magazines, thinks about church and different philosophies, and dreamt about some of life's pleasures.

Book 2, Chapter 17

Dick happened to see Tommy Barban in the Marienplatz in a café in Munich. Tommy introduced Dick to his friends, Prince Chillicheff, Mr. McKibben, and Mr. Hannan. Mr. Hannan jokingly asked Dick why he was fooling around with his aunt and what he was doing in Munich. Tommy remarked that Dick didn't look very well.

Topic Tracking: Sickness 5

Both Tommy and Tommy's friend, Prince Chillicheff were wearing nice clothes that they told Dick were made in Poland by a court tailor. Prince Chillicheff told Dick that they had been in hiding in Russia working in a government bakery, and they escaped. When Dick told them that he, too, is going to Innsbruck, McKibben asked Dick to travel with him, but Dick declined the offer. Dick did not want to deal with McKibben's governess and family.

Dick learned from the men that Abe North had been beaten to death at a speakeasy in New York. They talked about how Abe was a good musician who drank too much. The men debated whether or not this was at the Racquet Club or the Harvard Club. Dick is shocked and upset to hear this news. He asked the men if they are sure that it was Abe North. They told him that they read the news in the paper that morning. Dick repeated the news to himself, not really believing it. Dick was very sad about the death of his friend.

Book 2, Chapter 18

Dick arrived in Innsbruck and started thinking about how Nicole was far away. He remembered how he loved her when she was at her best. But, Dick needed to go away to find himself again.

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He is confused about Nicole and Rosemary. Dick thought that he had never felt more secure with himself than when he was with Nicole, although he admitted that her money made him feel trapped in the marriage.

Topic Tracking: Money 9

Dick started falling in love with every pretty girl that he saw. He noticed an attractive woman in the lobby.

Topic Tracking: Love 23

The two looked at each other, but then Dick turned away. The next day, Dick went up the Birkkarspitze with a guide, but a storm started so they had to turn back. When they returned, he saw the girl from the lobby again and he felt both excited and lonely.

He went back to his room and opened a telegram from Holmes, a rector at his father's church, telling him that his father has died. Dick was shocked and very upset. He read the message over a few times. He wondered how his father died and figured that it must have been old age. He began to think of fond memories of his father, the cleric, who had always had a good heart. Dick remembered how his father used his mother's money to put him through medical school.

Topic Tracking: Money 10

Dick made plans to sail for America, and he called Nicole to let her know.

Book 2, Chapter 19

Dick arrived in New York where he saw some familiar sights, but realized that he had no more connections to the place and he would probably not come back. Dick's father was buried next to many of their other relatives. "Good-by, my father--good-by, all my fathers," he says. Book 2, Chapter 19, pg. 205 On the boat ride back, Dick spoke with Albert McKisco, a popular novelist of the time who was modest about his success. Violet McKisco was also aboard and Dick noticed that she was now a charming married woman.

Dick arrived in Naples and saw Rosemary--the person he had come to see. She ran over to him and told him of the newest play she was making, and then ran off in a hurry. She told Dick to call her the next day. He thought about Rosemary and compared her youthful energy to his daughter's. It had been four years since they had met--he was now 38 and she was 22. Dick remembered the emotional state he had been in when he and Rosemary first met each other.

Dick ran into Collis Clay, a friend of he and Rosemary's, at the bar and asked Dick if he knew that Rosemary was there. Collis told Dick how Rosemary has become a woman of the world, much different from the young girl they had known.

Book 2, Chapter 20

Dick went up to Rosemary's room and told her that she still looked beautiful. Rosemary told him that her mother always liked him. Dick told her that he has seen a couple of her films, but that they weren't very popular. She said that she had some better roles coming up. The phone kept ringing and Rosemary talked to the person rather secretively, keeping her hand over the phone. Dick moved and Rosemary jumped up and tells him that her second cousin was on the phone and not to leave.

Rosemary told him that she was a woman now and she lowered the lights. They started to kiss. Dick asks her if she was still a virgin, and she avoided answering. Instead, she played games and teased him. They kissed passionately some more and talked. Rosemary had been using Dick as a basis of comparison for other men in her life. They took a walk outside together and Rosemary told Dick that she had already made other plans for the evening, but that she would see him tomorrow.

The next day, Rosemary took Dick to the set where she worked. She came out wearing a tunic and asked Dick for his opinion. One actress talked to Dick for a while, thinking that he was another actor. Dick saw Nicotera flirting with Rosemary. The actors had "risen to a position of prominence in a nation that for a decade had wanted only to be entertained." Book 2, Chapter 20, pg. 213 As they left the set, Nicotera whispered something to Rosemary. She left with Dick and they went to lunch. They then went back to the hotel and slept together at last.

Book 2, Chapter 21

That night Rosemary had other dinner plans, so Dick had a drink with Collis. Dick thought about how Nicole was his girl, and about how his time with Rosemary was just for fun. He ran into Baby Warren, and she was surprised to see him since she thought he was in America. They had dinner together and discussed Nicole's condition. Baby was upset that Nicole was not doing better. Baby suggested that Nicole and Dick live in London for a couple of months around sane, English people, rather than keeping Nicole at the clinic. Baby and Dick disagreed about the English. Baby tried to convince him to go to London, telling him how much money she had. Dick did not want to go to London.

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Baby asked if Dick thought Nicole would be better off with someone else. Dick was annoyed with this question because he loved Nicole.

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Dick changed the subject and started to ask her why she hasn't married yet. She told him that one of the Englishmen she loved was killed in the war, and the other one broke her heart.

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The next day, Dick had lunch with Rosemary and he realized that they were not in love. There was less passion between them than there was before.

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Dick thought about his love for Nicole. He asked Rosemary about her previous affairs with men. Nicotera, one of Rosemary's boyfriends, called and Dick left, even though Rosemary told him that he is the one she loves. They argued about her relationship with him, and she admitted that Nicotera wanted to marry her, but she said she did not want to marry him. Rosemary told Dick that she was confused. She started to cry and told Dick that she only cared about him and her mother. She asked Dick to stay, but he leaves her. Dick told her that he did not seem to make people happy anymore.

Book 2, Chapter 22

Dick sat at the Quirinal bar after dinner. He was in a bad mood and he told Collis that he did not like the Italians. He said that he left Rosemary for a few seconds and an Italian started flirting with her. Dick decided to take out his frustrations of the day on the Italian people. Rosemary sent Dick a note telling him that she did not go to the party. He told the messenger to tell Rosemary that he couldn't find him. Dick continued to insult Rome. He associated Rome with the end of he and Rosemary. Collis liked Rome, but Dick liked France.

The two men went to listen to a cabaret and became drunk. Dick was cruel to one of the men in the orchestra. Dick was not impressed with the atmosphere at the bar, and he was still in a foul mood. Dick became drunk and called the orchestra leader over and started insulting him. Dick noticed a pretty blond English girl smiling at him so he went over to her and asked her to dance. Dick went to get more to drink and he said goodbye to Collis, who was also intoxicated. When he went back to the dance floor to find the girl, she had disappeared.

Topic Tracking: English 10

Dick left the bar and argued with the taxi driver to take him back to the hotel for less than 100 lire, but the driver refused. Dick got in a fight with the taxi driver and fell and was taken to the police station. The captain at the desk told Dick to pay the driver and go home. He spoke to Dick in French, but Dick was not listening to him. Dick said he would pay, but then punched the police captain. They all beat Dick up, and left him injured and delirious.

Book 2, Chapter 23

The concierge at the hotel knocked on Baby's hotel room door in the middle of the night and told Baby that Dick has been in a fight with the police and that he was in jail. Dick had promised the taxi driver money for delivering the message to the concierge at Baby's hotel. Baby immediately headed to the police station and arrived to hear Dick screaming, asking if there were any English or Americans. Baby was furious when she saw Dick. Baby yelled at the police, who didn't speak English, and went to the American Embassy.

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When Baby arrived at the Embassy, she tried to get someone to help her but they refused to do anything until 9:00, because that was when the consulate opened. Baby begged and pleaded and cried, but they still refused to do anything until 9:00. They argued back and forth for a while. They gave her the address of the consulate and told her that is all they could do. She kept harassing them so they escorted her out.

Baby went and got Collis at his hotel, after convincing the concierge that they were not having an affair. She found him passed out naked in his bed. She took him to the police station with her so that he could stay with Dick while she went to see the consul.. Baby waited and finally got to talk to the consul at 9:00, but he made her wait another half an hour. Baby started yelling at the secretary and demanded that the consul come to the jail with her immediately. Finally, she was successful and the vice-consul accompanied her to the station.

Dick was ashamed of himself and he felt like a criminal. Collis asked Dick if he wanted revenge for what had been done to him, but Dick said no because he knew that he was at fault. Swanson, the friendly vice-consul came to speak with Dick. He told Dick that it was not smart to try to fight Italians. After some talk among the lawyers and the carabinieri, Dick was set free. He got in the cab with Baby and they gave him some morphine for his pain. Baby felt satisfied that she now possessed a moral superiority over Dick.

Book 3, Chapter 1

Frau Kaethe Gregorovius asked Franz how Nicole was doing. She assumed that Nicole must be sick since she saw him so much, and she told him that she was not fond of Nicole. Franz told her that he had to take care of Nicole since Dick had been away, but he told her that Dick would be returning from Rome the next day. Kaethe accused Nicole of being less sick than she acts, and said, "she only cherishes her illness as an instrument of power." Book 3, Chapter 1, pg. 239

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Kaethe went on to say that Dick only married Nicole for her money. She said that Nicole would not come close to her or let their children play together. Franz asked her to stop insulting Nicole since it was her money that enabled them to open to the clinic.

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Kaethe and Franz went to dinner, and when Kaethe saw Dick, she commented on how awful his appearance is and how she could smell liquor on his breath. She said that Dick was "no longer a serious man." Franz continued to defend his friend and he said that Dick was a more brilliant neuropathologist than he could ever be. As they went to sleep, Franz started to think that maybe Dick was no longer a serious man, and Kaethe was thinking that she may have been too hard on Dick.

Book 3, Chapter 2

Dick lied to Nicole and told her that he had been injured in Rome while trying to help a drunk friend. The relationship between Franz and Dick started to change. When Dick lost one of his patients, Franz suggested that he take a trip to Lausanne to work with a boy. In Lausanne, Dick met the boy's father, Senor Pardo y Cuidad Real (the Spaniard), and listened to him speak about his corrupt son, Francisco. Apparently Francisco's condition, homosexuality, had become worse because he had been drinking. Dick felt that the father was overreacting and being overdramatic, but he kept it to himself, and pretended to treat the matter seriously. Dick talked to Francisco, who thought his situation is hopeless. Dick told him that he needed to learn to control his sensuality. As they talk, Dick started to think about his relationships with his lovers and friends. In thinking of these relationships, he realized that, "There was some element of loneliness involved--so easy to be loved--so hard to love." Book 3, Chapter 2, pg. 245

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As they were talking, Royal Dumphry approached them. Dumphry flattered Dick by telling him that the night he had dinner with he and Nicole was one of the happiest memories in his life. Dumphry then mentioned to Dick that Nicole's father was in Lausanne and that he was dying. Dick was astonished to hear this news. Dick found Dr. Dangeu, who was taking care of Nicole's father and found out that his liver was failing--most likely because of his alcoholism. Senor Pardo returned and begged Dick to cure his son, but Dick said he couldn't commit a person on those grounds.

Dr. Dangeu returned and told Dick that Mr. Warren wished to see Nicole. Mr. Warren told Dick that he knew he had little right to see Nicole, but that it would make him very happy to see her for just ten minutes. Dick hesitated in approving this because he knew that Nicole was not strong, but he told Mr. Warren that he would consult his associate on the matter. Dick called Kaethe and told her that Nicole's father was dying and that he needed to talk to Franz right away. Kaethe accidentally told Nicole this information before Franz, and Nicole immediately ran off to see her father. Franz told Dick that Nicole was on her way, and Dick replied by telling Franz that Mr. Warren had disappeared. Mr. Warren had gone to the bar for a drink, and then got on a train for Paris. They suspected that he may be headed back to America. Dick tried to comfort Nicole and told her that her father may not be dying after all and that he would probably live to be 90.

Book 3, Chapter 3

A week later, Von Cohn Morris, one of Dick's patients, was packing up and left with his parents. Mr. Morris told Dick that it was time for him and the others to leave. He told Dick that his clinic had been a waste of his time and money. Dr. Ladislau, who Dick had never liked, had seen Mr. Morris because Dick could not be found. Von Cohn's father started yelling at Dick, telling him that his son, who was there for alcoholism, had smelt liquor on Dick's breath two times in the past month. Dick defended himself, not believing that he should have to give up something he enjoys. He also commented that Von Cohn was there for kleptomania. Dick asked Dr. Ladislau to say goodbye to Von Cohn and his family.

As he watched them drive away, Dick thought about how much he drank--a drink with each meal, a nightcap, and sometimes some gin during the day. Dick realized this is too much and he tried to think of ways to cut his liquor consumption in half. As he was doing this, Franz returned from his trip to Mount Everest. Dick told him about the Morris boy leaving, and Franz said that Ladislau had already told him and he asked Dick why he left. Dick tells him it was for "the usual incoherent reasons". Franz asked Dick if they should keep Ladislau. Dick told Franz that when Mr. Morris accused him of being a drunkard, Ladislau did nothing to help the situation. Although Dick denied having an alcohol problem, Franz said that he has noticed Dick drinking at inappropriate times and suggested that Dick may need a leave of absence. Dick did not see this as a solution and was upset with the situation, and kept thinking: "to explain, to patch--these were not natural functions at their age--better to continue with the cracked echo of an old truth in the ears." Book 3, Chapter 2, pg. 256 Dick told Franz that he wanted to leave the clinic for good, and Franz agreed, saying that he had expected this and that he could give Dick back all of Nicole's money by the end of the year. Dick felt a sense of relief. "Not without desperation he had long felt the ethics of his profession dissolving into a lifeless mass." Book 3, Chapter 3, pg. 256

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Book 3, Chapter 4

Dick returned to the Riviera to live with his family. They spent time traveling in France and Germany. Dick's children, Lanier and Topsy, now ages 11 and 9, became his main focus. He came to know his children much better than their mother did. Dick spent much time with them, noticing that they did not exhibit extreme emotions. Lanier was curious and unpredictable. Topsy was beautiful like her mother. Since they sold Nicole's share of the clinic and they had investments in America, money was plentiful and they were able to travel extravagantly. They traveled with maids and governess', who help them with their extensive amount of baggage on the train. The Diver attracted attention as if they were a royal family.

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When they got off the train, their hostess, the Contessa di Minghetti (Mary North) met them. The wealth of her family made the Divers seem simplistic. As Nicole and Dick got dressed for dinner, Dick commented about Mary North, saying that she knows what she wants and that, "If Europe ever goes Bolshevik she'll turn up as the bride of Stalin." Book 3, Chapter 4, pg. 259 Nicole laughed and told him to stop insulting Mary. At dinner, Dick told tales to Hosain, Mary's fiancé who had two children from another marriage, one of whom is sick. Later that night, Nicole lectured Dick for being rude to Hosain. Lanier was waiting for his parents in their suite and he told them that he had taken a bath in the same water as the sick child. Dick told Lanier to go take a bath in their room right away.

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Dick spoke to the governess' about changing the bath water, but worries that he may offend Mary. The next day, Mary spoke to Dick and was furious that he asked Hosian's sister to clean the tub. Dick had no idea that the woman he spoke to was Hosian's sister; he thought that she was a servant. Mary explained to Dick that it is the custom of Hosian's family was that when the oldest son marries, the oldest sister becomes Himadoun, or Mary's ladies in waiting. Dick apologized for not understanding what Mary had told him the night before. Mary demanded that they fetch Lanier so she can ask him about the dirty bath. Lanier told them that he thought the suds in the tub meant it was dirty, but he was mistaken. Dick laughed, trying to break the tension, but then made a comment to Mary about how she has become dull. The Divers decided to leave, and they departed on bad terms with Mary. As they left, Dick joked with Lanier about the situation.

Book 3, Chapter 5

Nicole sat looking out the window at Villa Diana. It was a sunny April day. Dick was yelling at the cook, Augustine, for drinking one of his vintage wines, and she commented on Dick's heavy drinking. Dick fired Augustine, and she became furious. Dick told Nicole to call the police. Augustine calmed down and her nephew came and took her away. Nicole and Dick went to Nice for dinner and talked about how Augustine had upset them both. Nicole brought up a serious matter. She said to Dick, "We can't go on like this--or can we?....What do you think?... Some of the time I think its my fault--I've ruined you." Book 3, Chapter 5, pg. 267 Dick's silence scared Nicole. When Nicole asked him what was in it for him, Dick's reply was distant, and he said that he got to know that she was stronger every day. Dick told her that they had to think about people other than themselves. He looked out to sea and noticed a yacht, the T.F. Golding, and suggested that they ask the people on board if they are happy. He noticed that Baby knows one of the men on board.

The two pull up next to the boat and Golding recognized them and inviteed them aboard. Nicole reluctantly stepped on board to join the party. She and Dick had gained a reputation as refusers, and this had led to their unpopularity. They looked at the people dancing, and Nicole saw Tommy. She was very excited to see Tommy, and she marveled at his tan skin and his handsome face. She told him that he looked like "all of those adventurers in the movies." She had not seen him in five years. Tommy started speaking to her in French, but she wanted him to speak in English, because he sounded more brave and heroic in French. Nicole noticed a beautiful woman in white standing next to Tommy and she asked him who she is. He tells her she is Lady Caroline Sibly-Biers, the wickedest woman in London. Nicole walked around and found Dick talking to Lady Caroline, but she could only hear pieces of their conversation. She heard Lady Caroline's angry reply and knew that Dick had offended someone else.

Nicole walked over to the piano and heard a song, written by Lady Caroline, about a young lady from hell. Nicole was impressed by the strength and the attitude of Lady Caroline. Dick said something else rude about Lady Caroline, and she went over to him and said loudly, so that others would hear, that she had seen him hanging around a questionable crowd in Lausanne. Nicole was furious with Lady Caroline for making this statement, and furious with Dick for taking them there in the first place. Nicole knew that Lady Caroline was probably upset with her for stealing away Tommy's attention.

Dick was missing for a while and Nicole found him out on the deck by the bow. He turns to her and says, "So you ruined me, did you? ...Then we're both ruined..." Book 3, Chapter 5, pg. 273 Dick turned away and Nicole started to cry. Tommy found them and was glad that Nicole had found Dick. Dick asked Tommy if he was rich, and Tommy says no, but he still had some stocks in the hands of friends. Nicole told Tommy that Dick is getting rich. Golding went up to Nicole and told her that he noticed that Dick had been drinking too much, and that she should tell him not to. Nicole seemed amazed that he should suggest that she tell Dick what to do. Tommy drove Dick and Nicole home, and Dick fell asleep drunk in the back seat.

Book 3, Chapter 6

Dick went into Nicole's room and told her that he felt badly about the night before. He asked her if Tommy drove them home, even though he knew that he did. Tommy asked Dick how Nicole was, and he told him that she had become hard. Nicole overheard them and knew that Tommy disliked Dick, and that he loved her. Nicole went outside to work in the garden and thought to herself. "She was somewhat shocked at the idea of being interested in another man--but other women have lovers--why not me?" Book 3, Chapter 6, pg. 276 This thought made Nicole happy. "If she need not, in her spirit, be forever one with Dick as he had appeared last night, she must be something in addition, not just an image on his mind, condemned to endless parades around the circumference of a medal." Book 3, Chapter 6, pg. 277 Nicole sat on the wall and looked out to sea. She looked out at the meadow and heard two men talking about the affair that one of the men had. Nicole went back to the house and found Dick and Tommy. Tommy told Nicole that he had to go. Nicole first insisted that she give him some camphor rub for his cough. Dick was upset with her for giving him the entire jar.

Dick lay in bed, not wanting to talk to Nicole. Nicole felt badly for having feelings for Tommy and she ran downstairs. In a week, Nicole had forgotten about Tommy. She found out that he was in Nice that summer, and he sent a letter to them. Nicole gave the letter to Dick, and he responded by throwing a telegram back at her.

Book 3, Chapter 7

The next morning, Nicole went to the beach with Dick. Ever since the night on the boat with Golding, Nicole had had some idea of what was going on. "So delicately balanced was she between an old foothold that had always guaranteed her security, and the imminence of a leap from which she might alight changed in the very chemistry of blood and muscle, that she did not dare bring the matter into the true forefront of consciousness." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 279 For months Nicole had sensed that things between she and Dick were changing. Dick had become increasingly indifferent, and he had been drinking too much. Nicole could not determine how Dick was going to behave from one day to the next. Nicole was ready for a change, and she felt that it would be a relief. Her money acted as a security blanket for her.

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The Divers went to the beach together. Nicole saw Dick looking around for the children, not for their protection but for his. Nicole had come to resent Dick--his jokes, his politeness- things she once enjoyed about him. Nicole was sad about this fact, and started to recall some fond memories of Dick. Nicole became upset again when she saw Dick looking for Rosemary in the water. She told him to swim out to Rosemary without her. Nicole watched them talking as if they had never had a relationship with one another. Nicole swam out to them, noticing that Rosemary was more confident than she had been five years ago. Rosemary said she wanted to pretend that she was 18 again, when she was so happy to be around Dick and Nicole. Dick played with Nicole in the water and started to seem happy again. He asked Nicole if she wanted to go aquaplaning on Rosemary's friend's boat. Nicole remembered when Dick used to be able to stand on his hands on the end of a board, and she agreed to go.

One of Rosemary's young male friends climbed onto the board and managed to ride along with the boat and then do a back flip off the board. Rosemary went next, and all of the guys on the boat scrambled to help her back on. Dick went next and tried to show off for Rosemary by doing a trick, which especially annoyed Nicole, but he ended up failing in his attempt. Frustrated, Dick tried the trick two more times, but he could not do it. Nicole was very annoyed by Dick's foolishness. Back at the beach, Nicole, Dick and Rosemary had a drink together and Dick asked Rosemary if she had noticed his deterioration. Rosemary said that she thinks it isn't true.

They saw Mary North, who saw them as well but pretends not to notice them. When Mary saw Rosemary, however, she changed her mind and decided to come over to them. Mary was friendly to Nicole and Rosemary, and glanced unhappily at Dick. Mary and Nicole politely asked about each other's children, and when Mary left Dick makes clear his dislike for her.

Rosemary suddenly remembered what she had heard about Dick. Some woman had said that Baby Warren's sister had thrown herself away on some doctor. The woman had commented on Dick saying, "He's not received anywhere anymore." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 287 This phrase had upset Rosemary.

Nicole wanted to leave, realizing that Dick would say anything to impress Rosemary. Dick said that Mary wasn't really that bad, but it upset him that she did not like him. Rosemary asked the two if they had seen any of her films--and if so, what they thought of them. Dick went on about his opinions on acting with real emotion. Dick started babbling on and on about playing a character, and finally, Nicole could no longer stand it. Rosemary turned to Topsy and asked her if she had ever thought of becoming an actress. Nicole snapped and told her not to put ideas like that into her child's head. Nicole got up and left in a rage.

Nicole entered the bathhouse, and started to feel happy. She felt that she was capable of being alone--being without Dick. She could tell that the end of them was near. When Nicole got home, she wrote Tommy a letter.

That night Nicole started to fear what was on Dick's mind. She knew that she had to escape, and that she could no longer delude herself. "Either you think--or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you." Book 3, Chapter 7, pg. 290 At dinner that night, Dick drank too much and played some jazz, with he and Nicole arguing over what songs for him to play. The next morning, Dick left a note saying he was going to Provence for a few days. As she was reading the letter, Tommy called and told her that he received her letter and he was on his way over.

Book 3, Chapter 8

Nicole bathed herself and thought to herself that she still looked young and beautiful. She put on a dress and some perfume and waited for Tommy. Although 29, Nicole still exuded some qualities of her 19-year-old self with her confidence. Nicole wanted a change--she wanted to have an affair. All summer she had watched people do whatever they wanted without consequence. She and Tommy started flirting with each other in French. Nicole told Tommy that Dick took off because of something to do with Rosemary. Dick told her that she was complicated and she replied, "No, I'm not really--I'm just a--I'm just a whole lot of different simple people." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 292 Tommy told Nicole that she was the most dramatic person he had ever known. He told her that she had too much money--and that "Dick can't beat that." Nicole asked him what she should do. "Everything Tommy said became part of her forever." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 293

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They had lunch together and then they started to kiss. They ride to Nice together, to go to Tommy's hotel in Monte Carlo. They did not make it all the way since Tommy pulled the car over at a small shore hotel in Nice. They drank some brandy in the hotel room and began to kiss again. They heard Americans talking loudly outside their window. Nicole told Tommy that she liked the simple, bare hotel room. She asked him to kiss her again, and he told her that she sounds American. This time, they heard two American sailors fighting outside their window and Tommy watched them. As the sailors' battleship took off, they heard screaming and crying. A girl knocked on their door and asked them if she could go on their balcony to say goodbye to her lover.

That night Nicole and Tommy ate dinner at the Beach Casino at Monte Carlo. Nicole looked out at the water. "Tangled with love in the moonlight she welcomed the anarchy of her lover." Book 3, Chapter 8, pg. 298 The next morning, Nicole told Tommy that she needed to get back to the children. Dick takes her back to Villa Diana and they kissed each other goodbye. She was glad to be back.

Book 3, Chapter 9

Dick arrived back earlier than expected without the car, because he didn't feel like driving it anymore. He told Nicole that he dropped Rosemary off in Avignon, but he didn't tell her in the note because he didn't want her imagining things. He told her that he wanted to find out if Rosemary had anything to offer. Dick told her that Rosemary did not grow up and he asked her what she has been doing. Nicole told him that she went out with Tommy--but Dick stopped her and told her that he didn't want to know about it.

The phone rang and it was Tommy asking Nicole to meet him in Cannes. He wanted her to tell him that she loved him. She told him that she does.

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Nicole then told him that she couldn't go right now, but that she would call him. Nicole tried to think back to what it was like when she and Dick were in love, but those pleasant thoughts were quickly replaced with ones of Dick's betrayal.

Nicole went over to speak with Dick and she found him sitting and thinking with a look of despair on his face. She felt sorry for him. Nicole wondered if he knew that he no longer controlled her. She touched his back and tried to comfort him and he told her not to touch him. When Nicole told him that she did not come to fight with him he said "Then why did you come, Nicole? I can't do anything for you anymore. I'm trying to save myself." Book 3, Chapter 9, pg. 301 Nicole became upset and told Dick that he was blaming her for his failures. He did not respond. Nicole thought about their marriage in her head--about her new love, coming out of her growing resentment for Dick, about Dick's bitterness, and his deterioration. She gathered up her courage and walked away, knowing that things between them were at last over for good. Dick thought to himself that finally, this case was finished, and he was free.

Book 3, Chapter 10

In the middle of the night, Nicole heard the phone ring and Dick speaking to someone in French. He told Nicole that it was a police officer. The police were holding Mary North and Sibley-Biers for a reason that they would not explain. They needed bail money and Dick saw this as his opportunity to do something good. Dick returned and tells Nicole the story. He found Mary and Lady Caroline dressed as French sailors. Apparently they had picked up two girls dressed like this, and the two girls ended up making a big scene. Mary pleaded with Dick to help them so that Hosian would not find out about this. Apparently, one of the girls they picked up was from a respectable family and the family was furious. They would have to make a settlement with this family. Dick told the police officer that Mary is an American citizen--the granddaughter of John Rockefeller Mellon. He went on to tell the officer that Lady Caroline is betrothed to the Duke of Buckingham. Dick then offered a thousand francs to each of the girls, and an additional payoff to the girl from the well-respected family, as well as a payoff to the police. The ladies were let out of prison and Dick told them that they each owe Gausse a hundred dollars. This was fine with Mary, but Caroline was outraged because she did not think that they should have been arrested in the first place. Gausse turned to Dick and said, "I have never seen women like this sort of women. I have known many of the great courtesans of the world, and for them I have much respect often, but women like these women I have never seen before." Book 3, Chapter 10, Page 306

Book 3, Chapter 11

The day after Dick returned, he and Nicole went to have haircuts together. Tommy passed by the window in a car, and Nicole wished that she was with him. Suddenly, Tommy walked into the barbershop. He made Dick get Nicole and brought her into the room with them. Dick and Nicole went to a café with Tommy and Tommy told Dick that Nicole was in love with him. Tommy wanted Dick to admit that their marriage is over. Nicole told Dick that she has grown fond of Tommy. She told Dick that things were never the same after Rosemary.

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Tommy broke in and said to Dick, "You don't understand Nicole. You treat her always as a patient because she was once sick." Book 3, Chapter 11, pg. 308

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An American interrupted them as they are talking. Dick told Tommy that he and Nicole had shared a great deal of happiness together. Tommy told Dick that Nicole wanted a divorce. Nicole told Dick that she knew he isn't happy with her anymore and that with her gone he would be able to get his work done. Dick told them since everything seemed to be settled, they should go back to the barbershop.

Dick told Tommy that he and Nicole would talk things over. Tommy could not resist telling him that from now on he would protect Nicole. With a minimum amount of drama, things ended. Nicole felt happy and excited.

Book 3, Chapter 12

Book 3, Chapter 12

Dick spent his last days on the Riviera with his children. He told them that they would live with their aunt that winter, but that they could come see him in America. Dick said goodbye to everyone and left a note for Nicole and one for Baby.

That morning, Dick saw Nicole and Baby on the beach. Nicole looks at Dick sitting on the rock and says, "When people are taken out of their depths they lose their heads, no matter how charming a bluff they put up." Book 3, Chapter 12, pg. 312 They continued to watch Dick from afar. Nicole told Baby that he was a good husband to her for 6 years.

Dick saw Nicole and Baby as he was sitting talking to Mary North. Mary asked Dick why he isn't nice all the time; like he was the night he helped them. Mary told him that Dick's friends still liked him, even though he said cruel things to them after he had been drinking. Dick told Mary that they are all dull, and Mary told him that they are all nice people. Dick looked at Mary fondly, and hoped for her sympathy. He asked her if she had liked him once, and she said that she loved him--that everybody loved him. Dick told her that there had always been something between them, no matter how charming a bluff they put up.