Part 2, Chapter 11 Notes from The Fountainhead

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The Fountainhead Part 2, Chapter 11

The Cosmo-Slotnik building opens in December. Keating feels bored and unhappy at the opening. Ellsworth takes him to a restaurant and tells him this sort of thing is the best life has for him. The only interest Keating shows is when Toohey tells him he will look good in the newsreels. Toohey says it's too bad Keating isn't married, and says Dominique would be a good person to have for a wife. Keating says he doesn't love her. Ellsworth responds that the reason Keating isn't happy is that he hasn't accepted that he is the least important part of the night. Once he realizes the joy of selflessness, he will achieve greatness. He says personal love is bad because it favors one person, and that all are equal. This comforts Keating because it reminds him of an unnamed man we (the reader) know is Roark.

Topic Tracking: Collectivism 8

At the Arts Ball, the architects dress up as their best buildings. Roark was invited, but doesn't show up.

While working on the Temple, Roark tells his secretary to get Steve Mallory's phone number. He is difficult to reach, but she finds an address without a telephone for him. Roark writes a letter to him asking him to call the office, and about a week later, he does. They arrange a meeting. Mallory doesn't show up, and Roark goes to his apartment to find him; it is a dirty small apartment. Mallory is drunk. Obviously disillusioned, Mallory asks him why he's really here, not accepting the reason Roark gives (he likes his work). Roark convinces him. He finally accepts what he's been trying to believe was impossible-and cries. Roark asks him to talk about what is important to him-and he does-no one had ever cared what was really important to him.

Topic Tracking: Individualism 3

Mallory comes into Roark's office. When he starts planning, there is no uncertainty; he holds up his drawing to the street out the window, and says that it isn't possible that the two could exist in the same world. Roark is making that possible. He tells Roark that he knows it's horrible when people don't see things, and its even worse when they see it and don't want it. He asks if Roark understands, but he doesn't. He declares Roark too innocent to understand, and talks about his worst fear - a beast destroying the world. Roark asks why he shot at Toohey. Mallory says he doesn't like to talk about it, but it was the right question to ask. Roark explains what he wants for the sculpture, and suggests Dominique as a model; Mallory agrees right away that she would be perfect.

Guy Francon, Peter Keating, and Ellsworth all express their displeasure with Dominique's decision to pose for Roark's sculptor. Ellsworth says that Roark's choice of Mallory (being the man who shot at Toohey) was not a coincidence. Dominique reminds him that it was he who convinced Stoddard to hire him.

During the winter Roark works on three projects. In March he stands at the site of the temple, looking at it. It is composed of horizontal lines, indicating the strength of one's own spirit rather than to heaven. He goes to Mallory's studio where Dominique is posing for him; things hadn't been working yet, and they took a break. Mallory says they are done for the night, but Dominique takes off her robe, goes to the stand, and poses as she was doing before, but this time she is more alive. Mallory rushes to his board and starts working, while Roark watches Dominique.

During April, Roark, Mallory, Dominique, and Mike often stay after hours talking and drinking coffee, enjoying each other's company.

Construction stops on the Aquitania because of stock market problems; Kent Lansing assures Roark they'll finish it, although he knows it won't be soon. Ellsworth calls it the "Unfinished Symphony," and Dominique uses that name in her column. Soon everyone is calling it that, even people who don't know the story. After a few weeks, Roark makes himself forget about the Aquitania.

A few weeks before the opening of the temple, Roark and Dominique walk there; the harmony between them in the presence of the building makes speech unnecessary.

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