Scene 6: The Same Notes from Dr. Faustus

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Dr. Faustus Scene 6: The Same

Deep down in his heart, Faustus begins to regret making the deal and accuses Mephistophilis of depriving him of the joys of heaven. Mephistophilis tells him that man is more glorious than heaven because it was made for man. It follows then, argues Faustus, that if heaven was made for man, if was made for him. He wants to turn away from magic and repent.

The Good Angel and Evil Angel enter again. The Good Angel urges Faustus to repent, for God will forgive him. The Evil Angel claims that God cannot pity him. It seems Faustus hears what the Evil Angel says, but tells himself that even if he were a devil, God will pity him if he repents. The Evil Angel presumes that Faustus will never repent. The two angels exit. Faustus says:

"My heart's so hard'ned I cannot repent.
Scarce can I name salvation, faith, or heaven,
But fearful echoes thunder in mine ears
'Faustus, thou art damn'd!'"
Scene 6, pg. 25

Perhaps he should have killed himself before gaining the power's bestowed upon him. Faustus is somehow able to pull himself out of despair, resolving never to repent. He begins to question Mephistophilis about astrology and Mephistophilis obliges by giving him answers. But Faustus knows that the answers to his questions are elementary. Faustus then challenges Mephistophilis by asking who made the world. Mephistophilis refuses to answer because he is not allowed to talk about God, the Creator. Faustus' mind reverts to thoughts about God and he is troubled once more.

The Good Angel and Evil Angel again appear. The Evil Angel claims it is too late to repent, that if he repents, devils will come and kill Faustus. The Good Angel claims it is never too late to repent, that if Faustus repents, no devil can harm him. They exit.

Faustus calls on the name of Christ to save his soul. Just then, Lucifer, Belzebub, and Mephistophilis enter. Lucifer explains that Christ cannot save his soul. Faustus asks about his identity, and Lucifer introduces himself and his companion, Belzebub, as princes of hell. Faustus thinks they have come to take away his soul. Lucifer claims they have come only because Faustus has broken his promise by calling on Christ. Lucifer tells Faustus to think of the devil, not God. Faustus promises not to think of heaven, or call on the name of God. He even vows to burn the Scriptures.

Topic Tracking: Duality of Man 6
Topic Tracking: Hubris 7

Lucifer is quite pleased. He tells Faustus that they will entertain him with the display of the Seven Deadly Sins. Faustus is delighted as he watches each of the Seven Deadly Sins appear:

Pride claims to be like a flea, able to climb all over a wench. Then complaining of a smell, he vows to speak no more. Covetousness wishes the house and all in it were turned to gold so he can keep it locked up in his chest. Wrath tells Faustus that after having leapt out of a lion's mouth (he was born in hell) he has been all over the world, wielding a pair of rapiers. Envy wishes all books were burnt because he cannot read and that there would be famine so he can live alone and be fat. He complains that others are sitting, while he is standing. Gluttony complains that he has only enough money for thirty meals a day. He speaks of his ancestors-all having some name synonymous with food. Sloth gripes about having been called away from his life of lying on a sunny bank. Finally, Lechery (apparently a female characterization) parades around and makes a suggestive comment about being full of lust. Lucifer quickly sends them away to hell and the Sins exit.

Topic Tracking: Sin & Repentance 5

Lucifer asks if Faustus likes the show. Faustus answers that it feeds his soul and wonders if he can visit hell. Lucifer promises to send for him at midnight. He gives Faustus a spell book that shows how one can turn into any shape. Faustus thanks Lucifer and bids him farewell. Wagner enters to narrate some of Faustus' adventures. He then introduces what Faustus will do next-visit the Pope in Rome.

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