Emma Quotes

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Emma Quotes

Quote 1: "doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgments, but directed chiefly by her own. The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself...." Chapter 1, pg. 3

Quote 2: "from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done a sad thing for herself as for them, and would have been a great deal happier if she had spent all the rest of her life at Hartfield." Chapter 1, pp. 5-6

Quote 3: "Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them...." Chapter 1, pg. 8

Quote 4: "'I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to "Yes," she ought to say "No" directly.'" Chapter 7, pg. 47

Quote 5: "Her character depends upon those she is with; but in good hands she will turn out a valuable woman." Chapter 8, pg. 53

Quote 6: "She did not always feel so absolutely satisfied with herself, so entirely convinced that her opinions were right and her adversary's wrong, as Mr. Knightley." Chapter 8, pg. 61

Quote 7: "'Whatever you say is always right, and therefore I suppose, and believe, and hope it must be so; but otherwise I could not have imagined it. It is so much beyond anything I deserve.'" Chapter 9, pg. 69

Quote 8: "'That is the case with us all, papa. One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.'" Chapter 9, pg. 76

Quote 9: "amusing herself in the consideration of the blunders which often arise from a partial knowledge of circumstances, of the mistakes which people of high pretensions to judgment are for ever falling into...." Chapter 13, pg. 104

Quote 10: "determined that he did know what he was talking about, and that he showed a very amiable inclination to settle early in life, and to marry from worthy motives." Chapter 24, pg. 186

Quote 11: "She had a little beauty and a little accomplishment, but so little judgment that she thought herself coming with superior knowledge of the world, to enliven and improve a country neighbourhood; and conceived Miss Hawkins to have held such a place in society as Mrs. Elton's consequence only could surpass." Chapter 33, pg. 256

Quote 12: "'I have no faith in Mrs. Elton's acknowledging herself the inferior in thought, word, or deed; or in her being under any restraint beyond her own scanty rule of good breeding. I cannot imagine that she will not be continually insulting her visitor with praise, encouragement, and offers of service; that she will not be continually detailing her magnificent intentions from the procuring her a permanent situation to the including her in those delightful exploring parties which are to take place in the barouche-landau.'" Chapter 33, pg. 264

Quote 13: "He could not see her in a situation of such danger without trying to preserve her. It was his duty." Chapter 41, pg. 320

Quote 14: "Donwell was famous for its strawberry-beds, which seemed a plea for the invitation; but no plea was necessary; cabbage-beds would have been enough to tempt the lady, who only wanted to be going somewhere." Chapter 42, pg. 324

Quote 15: "'Ah! ma'am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me, but you will be limited as to number--only three at once.'" Chapter 43, pg. 340

Quote 16: "She had been often remiss, her conscience told her so; remiss, perhaps, more in thought than fact; scornful, ungracious. But it should be so no more. In the warmth of true contrition she would call upon her the very next morning, and it should be the beginning, on her side, of a regular, equal, kindly intercourse." Chapter 44, pg. 346

Quote 17: "The intention, however, was indubitable; and whether it was that his manners had in general so little gallantry, or however else it happened, but she thought nothing became him more. It was with him of so simple, yet so dignified a nature. She could not but recall the attempt with great satisfaction." Chapter 45, pg. 354

Quote 18: "'To come among us with professions of openness and simplicity; and such a league in secret to judge us all! Here have we been the whole winter and spring, completely duped, fancying ourselves all on an equal footing of truth and honour, with two people in the midst of us who may have been carrying round, comparing and sitting in judgment on sentiments and words that were never meant for both to hear.'" Chapter 46, pg. 367

Quote 19: "It darted through her with the speed of an arrow that Mr. Knightley must marry no one but herself!" Chapter 47, pg. 375

Quote 20: "the resolution of her own better conduct, and the hope that, however inferior in spirit and gaiety might be the following and every future winter of her life to the past, it would yet find her more rational, more acquainted with herself, and leave her less to regret when it were gone." Chapter 48, pg. 388

Quote 21: "'A man would always wish to give a woman a better home than the one he takes her from; and he who can do it, where there is no doubt of her regard, must, I think, be the happiest of mortals.'" Chapter 49, pg. 393

Quote 22: "'If not in our dispositions...there is a likeness in our destiny; the destiny which bids fair to connect us with two characters so much superior to our own.'" Chapter 54, pg. 440

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