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Chapter 14 Notes from Candide

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Candide Chapter 14

"How Candide and Cacambo Were Received by the Jesuits in Paraguay"

Candide and Cacambo, a valet Candide procured in Cadiz, leave Buenos Aires. Candide is distressed that he must leave Cunégonde behind. He observes innocently that the governor won't be able to marry them the next day. Cacambo, who is a little more worldly, assures Candide that women have ways of getting by. Candide misses the implication that, at the very least, Cunégonde will be able to prostitute herself in some fashion.

Cacambo suggests they fight for the Jesuits instead. He rallies Candide's spirits, telling him that adventures are good things to have. Cacambo knows Los Padres, the government of the Jesuits, and he ironically sings their praises.

"'Los Padres have everything and the people have nothing; 'tis the masterpiece of reason and justice. For my part, I know nothing so divine as Los Padres who here make war on Kings of Spain and Portugal and in Europe act as their confessors; who here kill Spaniards and at Madrid send them to Heaven[.]'" Chapter 14, pg. 55

When they reach the Jesuit camp, Candide and Cacambo are treated with hostility, but when the German commandant discovers that Candide is a German, he invites Candide to enjoy the commandant's lush arbor while the heat of the sun beats down on the Paraguayans.

When Candide tells the commandant that he was born in the castle Thunder-ten-tronckh in "filthy" Westphalia, the two Germans recognize each other; the commandant is Cunégonde's brother, the Baron's son who did not die from the Bulgarian invasion after all. The reunion is joyful. Candide sweetly notes how happy Pangloss would be if he had not been hanged, an observation which seems to go without saying. Candide tells the Baron's son that Cunégonde is still alive.

Topic Tracking: Hypocrisy 8
Topic Tracking: Pride 5

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