Notes on Objects & Places from Antony and Cleopatra

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Antony and Cleopatra Objects/Places

triumvirate: Refers to the three men who rule the Roman Empire at the beginning of the play: Octavius Caesar, Lepidus, and Mark Antony. This is the second triumvirate in Rome’s history; the first one was made up of Julius Caesar, Marcus Crassus, and Pompey the Great.

Rome: The capitol of the Empire and the center of the Western world at this time.

Egypt: The country that Cleopatra rules, and the center of the Eastern world in this play.

weet: Acknowledge.

die: Has a double meaning: also, a woman’s orgasm.

noise: Rumor.

poorer moment: Lesser cause.

mettle: Sexual vigor.

abstract: Epitome.

mandragora: A narcotic which comes from the mandrake root.

Sicily: The location of Pompey’s camp.

Misena: Misenum, in Southern Italy.

cloy: Satisfy.

riggish: Wanton, licentious.

meaner: A person of lower status.

cuckoo: A bird that lives in the nests of other birds (the root of the term 'cuckold').

timelier: Earlier.

Nile River: The largest river in Egypt; the Egyptians use it to tell the fortunes of the upcoming seasons.

greensickness: An anemia that affects woman; also lovesickness.

Philipi: The site of the battle Antony fought against Brutus. In Julius Caesar, the title character was murdered by Brutus and Cassius, among others, and a new triumvirate formed, the same one that we see at the beginning of this play: Antony, Octavius Caesar, and Lepidus. The three fight Brutus for revenge, and he is defeated, and later he kills himself.

merely: Utterly.

alone the villain of the earth: The greatest villain of the earth.

mine: Abundance.

turpitude: Depravity.

mean: Suicide.

odds: The quality distinguishing one thing from another.

moiety: Half.

figs: Used to disguise the asp brought to Cleopatra by the Clown

asp: A poisonous snake said to kill painlessly.

after wrath: The wrath given by the gods to a person who has been lucky in life after they die.

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