Animal Farm Quotes

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Animal Farm Quotes

Quote 1: "Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself." Chapter 1, pg. 7

Quote 2: "All men are enemies. All animals are comrades." Chapter 1, pg. 9

Quote 3: "THE SEVEN COMMANDMENTS
1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
3. No animal shall wear clothes.
4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
6. No animal shall kill any other animal.
7. All animals are equal." Chapter 2, pg. 21

Quote 4: "The animals were happy as they had never conceived it possible to be. Every mouthful of food was an acute positive pleasure, now that it was truly their own food, produced by themselves and for themselves, not doled out to them by a grudging master." Chapter 3, pg. 24

Quote 5: "I will work harder!" Chapter 3, pg. 25

Quote 6: "FOUR LEGS GOOD, TWO LEGS BAD" Chapter 3, pg. 29

Quote 7: "It was given out that the animals there practised cannibalism, tortured one another with red-hot horseshoes, and had their females in common. This was what came of rebelling against the laws of Nature, Frederick and Pilkington said." Chapter 4, pg. 33

Quote 8: "'I have no wish to take life, not even human life,' repeated Boxer, and his eyes were full of tears." Chapter 4, pg. 37

Quote 9: "No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?" Chapter 5, pp. 47-8

Quote 10: "Napoleon is always right." Chapter 5, pg. 48

Quote 11: "All that year the animals worked like slaves. But they were happy in their work; they grudged no effort or sacrifice, well aware that everything they did was for the benefit of themselves and those of their kind who would come after them, and not for a pack of idle, thieving human beings." Chapter 6, pg. 51

Quote 12: "The human beings did not hate Animal Farm any less now that it was prospering; indeed, they hated it more than ever." Chapter 6, pg. 56

Quote 13: "They were always cold, and usually hungry as well." Chapter 7, pp. 62-3

Quote 14: "If a window was broken or a drain was blocked up, someone was certain to say that Snowball had come in the night and done it, and when the key of the store-shed was lost, the whole farm was convinced that Snowball had thrown it down the well. Curiously enough, they went on believing this even after the mislaid key was found under a sack of meal." Chapter 7, pg. 66

Quote 15: "If she herself had had any picture of the future, it had been of a society of animals set free from hunger and the whip, all equal, each working according to his capacity, the strong protecting the weak... Instead - she did not know why - they had come to a time when no one dared speak his mind, when fierce, growling dogs roamed everywhere, and when you had to watch your comrades torn to pieces after confessing to shocking crimes." Chapter 7, pp. 73-4

Quote 16: "[S]ome of the animals remembered - or thought they remembered - that the Sixth Commandment decreed 'No animal shall kill any other animal.' And though no one cared to mention it in the hearing of the pigs or the dogs, it was felt that the killings which had taken place did not square with this." Chapter 8, pg. 76

Quote 17: "It had become usual to give Napoleon the credit for every successful achievement and every stroke of good fortune. You would often hear one hen remark to another, 'Under the guidance of our Leader, Comrade Napoleon, I have laid five eggs in six days'; or two cows, enjoying a drink at the pool, would exclaim, 'Thanks to the leadership of Comrade Napoleon, how excellent this water tastes!'" Chapter 8, pg. 78

Quote 18: "Reading out the figures in a shrill, rapid voice, he proved to them in detail that they had more oats, more hay, more turnips than they had had in Jones's day, that they worked shorter hours, that their drinking water was of better quality, that they lived longer, that a larger proportion of their young ones survived infancy, and that they had more straw in their stalls and suffered less from fleas." Chapter 9, pg. 93

Quote 19: "Besides, in those days they had been slaves and now they were free, and that made all the difference, as Squealer did not fail to point out." Chapter 9, pg. 94

Quote 20: "Napoleon had denounced such ideas as contrary to the spirit of Animalism. The truest happiness, he said, lay in working hard and living frugally." Chapter 10, pg. 107

Quote 21: "Only old Benjamin professed to remember every detail of his long life and to know that things never had been, nor ever could be much better or much worse - hunger, hardship and disappointment being, so he said, the unalterable law of life." Chapter 10, pg. 109

Quote 22: "ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL, BUT SOME ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS" Chapter 10, pg. 112

Quote 23: "No question now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Chapter 10, pg. 118

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