'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?': A Psychologist Explains the Development of Racial Identity Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

Beverly Daniel Tatum
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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. William E. Cross, Jr. is a professor and head of the doctoral program in social-personality psychology at what institution?

2. What university did Tatum attend and describe as a black school that had recently gone co-ed in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 5, Racial Identity in Adulthood?

3. What refers to a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger, evil, pain, etc., whether the threat is real or imagined?

4. In Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 3, Tatum writes that she often opens race seminars with adults by asking them about what?

5. What refers to the state of being withdrawn or isolated from the objective world, as through indifference or disaffection?

Short Essay Questions

1. What does Tatum say is a misconception parents have about their children in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 3, The Early Years?

2. How does White culture impact whites in the collegiate setting, as described by Tatum in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 5, Racial Identity in Adulthood?

3. How does the author relate personal identity to the surrounding social group in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 2, The Complexity of Identity?

4. Why does Beverly Tatum claim not to have sat at the "Black table" in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 5, Racial Identity in Adulthood?

5. When in an individual's life does the impact of racism begin, according to the author in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 1, Defining Racism? How is it developed?

6. How does Tatum describe her conception of herself regarding race in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 5, Racial Identity in Adulthood?

7. What co-evolving processes construct personal identity according to the author in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 2, The Complexity of Identity?

8. What does the author write in Part II, Understanding Blackness in a White Context, Chapter 3, The Early Years that she begins adult seminars with asking?

9. What experiment does the author describe enacting on young students in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 2, The Complexity of Identity? What results does she find?

10. How does the author describe reverse racism in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 1, Defining Racism?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

Define and discuss the terms "people of color" and reverse racism. How does the author choose to use these terms and why?

Essay Topic 2

Describe and discuss the origins and history of affirmative action in the United States. When were the first affirmative action goals introduced and by whom?

Essay Topic 3

Discuss the differences and similarities between the dominant and subordinate groups described in the author's experimentation in Part I, A Definition of Terms, Chapter 2, The Complexity of Identity. How might the responses change at different ages?

(see the answer keys)

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