Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. Americans believed that heavy bombers had what quality?
(a) Invincibility.
(b) Perfect accuracy.
(c) Stealth.
(d) Unlimited mobility.

2. Which of the following does the author not list as a cause of the increasing lack of individuality with which solders were treated?
(a) The ideological nature of the war.
(b) Military training.
(c) Huge numbers of casualties.
(d) Constant flow of reinforcements.

3. According to the stereotype about Chinese troops, they could survive indefinitely if provided with what?
(a) Soy bean rations.
(b) Dry noodles.
(c) A handful of rice a day.
(d) Dog meat.

4. According to one rumor, female axis agents were sent to the allies with what?
(a) Poison lipstick.
(b) Bombs.
(c) Venereal diseases.
(d) Concealable radios.

5. How old were axis soldiers compared to allied soldiers?
(a) No accurate records exist for the axis.
(b) About the same age.
(c) Slightly older.
(d) Slightly younger.

6. According to one rumor, what substance was added to food served to servicemen?
(a) Sulfur.
(b) Wax.
(c) Petrol.
(d) Saltpeter.

7. Compared with the enlisted men, officers would best be described as which of the following?
(a) Cowardly.
(b) Intelligent.
(c) Aggressive.
(d) Entitled.

8. The use of meaningless and tedious tasks as hazing would best be described as which of the following?
(a) Constant.
(b) Uncommon.
(c) Common.
(d) Rare.

9. Most proponents of precision bombing suggested that it be used to destroy what enemy targets?
(a) Fortifications.
(b) Ground troops.
(c) Industry.
(d) Civilian populations.

10. The rumor about German sympathizers conveying intelligence to the enemy suggested that they were relaying what type of information?
(a) Troop locations.
(b) Air strike flight plans.
(c) Troop movements.
(d) Artillery locations.

11. What belief about the Japanese caused Americans to think that their war with Japan would end quickly?
(a) They had no heavy weapons or large ships.
(b) They lacked discipline.
(c) They were a backwards people.
(d) They were inefficient soldiers.

12. Allegedly, agents working for the axis spread what rumor?
(a) French women all bore venereal diseases.
(b) The Oder river had never been crossed by an invading force.
(c) German soldiers ate metal shavings with their food.
(d) Soldiers' wives were unfaithful.

13. What drink were Royal Navy servicemen issued with?
(a) Schnapps.
(b) Gin.
(c) Rum.
(d) Whiskey.

14. What are the "Unread Books" to which Chapter 5's title alludes?
(a) The lives that dead soldiers never got to experience.
(b) The lack of interest most officers had for their men.
(c) The vague orders given to many officers.
(d) The stories about secret military plans.

15. When did heavy drinking begin for most conscripts?
(a) On their first leave while in Europe.
(b) Stateside training.
(c) In France.
(d) On the transports.

Short Answer Questions

1. How were military blunders usually treated in official reports?

2. Which of the following is not a concept that the iconic pre-war image in Chapter 1 is said to convey?

3. According to the author, what was the unstated purpose of the use of inveterate profanity?

4. What term does the author not use as an example of vocabulary intended to demean enlisted men?

5. In the iconic pre-war image discussed in Chapter 1, the soldiers are best described as being which of the following?

(see the answer keys)

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