The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision Test | Final Test - Hard

James Redfield
This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 144 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. With what does Feyman walk?

2. At the end of Chapter 6, where does Wil tell the narrator they must go for more enlightenment?

3. What does the narrator say began in the 1960's?

4. What do Wil and the narrator learn from Feyman's Birth Vision?

5. What does the the narrator urge Wil to do at the beginning of Chapter 6?

Short Essay Questions

1. What does the narrator urge Wil to do?

2. What does the narrator realize about all his previous lives and what he thinks is needed to change the trend?

3. What does the narrator tell about a previous life of his as a monk?

4. Into what is the narrator drawn in hell and what does he see?

5. What happens to the group from the cave in Chapter 8 as they go towards the building with the Experiment?

6. What does Wil say is their task concerning the Group of Seven?

7. Who is in the cave when Webber and the narrator arrive there and what does she/he say?

8. What does the narrator say he realized about humans born into the world?

9. What did the narrator see begin to emerge that changed the way humans interacted with the world?

10. What happens when the Group decide to try and end the Experiment by combining their energies?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

It's becoming clearer with each passing chapter that, without actually coming out and saying so, perspective is anchored in the concept of destiny - that each individual comes into this existence with a pre-ordained place, purpose and plan. It's also becoming clearer that while the narrative clearly makes the point that that plan doesn't always come to fruition, it also implies that such failure is the result of inability (for whatever reason) to make the choices for the plan to be accomplished ... in other words, because of free will.

1. What do you think the definition of destiny is and why do you think the author is supporting that concept in this book? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Assuming that destiny is true, and that having a vision of what one is to accomplish in life before being born is true but forgotten with birth, explain with examples, why often the purpose of an individual does not come to fruition.

3. Most religions espouse the idea of free will. Those who have no spiritual beliefs would probably agree. Explain the concept of free will, why it might be a law of life and how it seems to manifest in the real world. Use examples to support your answer.

Essay Topic 2

In many ways, what's going on in Chapter 6, Part 2, is a form of myth making, of creating a spiritual, acceptable, and hopefully peace-achieving explanation of what, in most experiences of being human, is the physically oriented, confusing, and frustration-triggering question of why we're here.

1. Explain why this book could be called "myth making." Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Do you think there is a spiritual, acceptable, and hopefully peace-achieving explanation of why humans exist? Why or why not. Use examples to support your opinion.

3. Do you think most humans wonder why they are here? Why or why not? Use examples to support your opinion.

Essay Topic 3

The idea of Birth Vision, Wil explains, is an explanation of commonly reported near death experiences in which a dying individual reports that his/her life has "flashed before her eyes". In the same way, the concept of Soul Group is an explanation of a similarly reported near death experience in which dying individuals experience themselves as being welcomed by a group of unidentifiable but familiar and loving souls.

1. If one was to assume that there is indeed a Birth Vision, what do you think would be the purpose of forgetting it as soon as one is born? Does that seem inefficient as far as accomplishing a task on earth? Why or why not?

2. Explain, in the context of this entire book, and in the context of what you think is true, why a Birth Vision is called that in this book. Why might it not be called a Death Vision, given the circumstances under which one has it?

3. Taking the concept of Soul Group as being true and reincarnation as being true, what do you think would be a good reason to have a Soul Group, both on earth in physical incarnation and on the other plane as spiritual entities? Use examples from the book and your own life to support your answer.

(see the answer keys)

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