The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

James Redfield
This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 141 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does the narrator rationalize about his ankle?

2. Where does the narrator go when he and Webber part company?

3. Why does Lipscomb leave?

4. To what does the narrator suggest the jeeps are connected?

5. Why does Williams deliberately ignore the pleas of a white woman and large white man to negotiate for peace in a past life?

Short Essay Questions

1. What is the narrator doing when he encounters Maya again and what does she tell him? What do they do?

2. What happens to Wil and the narrator when they move to another plane?

3. Wwho seems to lead the narrator into the valley, where does he go and what does he do?

4. What does Wil say about the scenarios the narrator saw?

5. What was the main event which brought the narrator to an Appalachian valley at the beginning of the book?

6. What happens when the Group decide to try and end the Experiment by combining their energies?

7. What does a sudden connection with the narrator's Soul Group bring to his mind about a previous life?

8. What does Long Eagle reveal to the Narrator when he meets him at the falls?

9. Describe what the four members of the Group first do when they meet at the waterfall and what they see.

10. What does Long Eagle say about the valley in Chapter 1?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

If a story can be likened to a jigsaw puzzle, the construction of a narrative telling that story can be likened to the careful placement of pieces of that puzzle in order to slowly, tantalizingly, and inevitably fill the reader with the desire to see the whole picture. In that sense, the telling of this particular story functions well, with details of meaning, incident, and relationship complimenting and illuminating each other with highly intriguing results.

1. What do you think the first sentence above means? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. In view of all the novels you have read or heard about or movies you have seen, explain why leaving readers with a "what happens next" question is universal. Use examples from this book and other books you have read to illustrate this principle and why it is used.

3. Do you believe the second sentence is true? Why or why not? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

Essay Topic 2

It's becoming clearer with each passing chapter that, without actually coming out and saying so, perspective is anchored in the concept of destiny - that each individual comes into this existence with a pre-ordained place, purpose and plan. It's also becoming clearer that while the narrative clearly makes the point that that plan doesn't always come to fruition, it also implies that such failure is the result of inability (for whatever reason) to make the choices for the plan to be accomplished ... in other words, because of free will.

1. What do you think the definition of destiny is and why do you think the author is supporting that concept in this book? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Assuming that destiny is true, and that having a vision of what one is to accomplish in life before being born is true but forgotten with birth, explain with examples, why often the purpose of an individual does not come to fruition.

3. Most religions espouse the idea of free will. Those who have no spiritual beliefs would probably agree. Explain the concept of free will, why it might be a law of life and how it seems to manifest in the real world. Use examples to support your answer.

Essay Topic 3

Is it stereotypical that insight into the human/animal relationship comes from a Native American character, who in many narratives is portrayed as having a "special" relationship with nature? Or is it archetypal? Might it not have more thematic weight and/or depth if the narrator had REALIZED it, rather than having it explained to him as he has had so many things, repetitively and almost tediously, explained to him/preached at him ... and therefore preached at the reader?

1. Is it stereotypical that insight into the human/animal relationship comes from a Native American character, who in many narratives is portrayed as having a "special" relationship with nature? Explain what you think this statements means with examples from this book and your own life and knowledge.

2. After researching the terms stereotype and archetype, argue for this area of the book to be one or the other. Use examples from the text to illustrate your points.

3. Explain why someone might learn something better and retain it longer if they had learned or researched it themselves rather than had someone tell them.

(see the answer keys)

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