The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

James Redfield
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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. To what does the narrator suggest the jeeps are connected?

2. Who is Joel Lipscomb?

3. Who is David Long Eagle?

4. How does Maya react to the narrator's comment about her?

5. What do Webber and the narrator agree upon before they separate?

Short Essay Questions

1. What does Williams see in his life review that also involves Long Eagle?

2. Wwho seems to lead the narrator into the valley, where does he go and what does he do?

3. What is the narrator doing when he encounters Maya again and what does she tell him? What do they do?

4. What does the narrator tell Maya about what he believes is her purpose and how does she react?

5. What does Webber intuitively feel as he and the narrator talk and what happens right after that feeling?

6. What do Wil and the narrator do with Williams and what do they learn about him?

7. How did the narrator determine he needed to come to an Appalachian valley?

8. What does Wil say he sees in Maya's dream?

9. What does Webber explain to the narrator about the Experiment and his involvement?

10. What happens in the narrator's initial encounter with Maya?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

In many ways, what's going on in Chapter 6, Part 2, is a form of myth making, of creating a spiritual, acceptable, and hopefully peace-achieving explanation of what, in most experiences of being human, is the physically oriented, confusing, and frustration-triggering question of why we're here.

1. Explain why this book could be called "myth making." Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Do you think there is a spiritual, acceptable, and hopefully peace-achieving explanation of why humans exist? Why or why not. Use examples to support your opinion.

3. Do you think most humans wonder why they are here? Why or why not? Use examples to support your opinion.

Essay Topic 2

It's becoming clearer with each passing chapter that, without actually coming out and saying so, perspective is anchored in the concept of destiny - that each individual comes into this existence with a pre-ordained place, purpose and plan. It's also becoming clearer that while the narrative clearly makes the point that that plan doesn't always come to fruition, it also implies that such failure is the result of inability (for whatever reason) to make the choices for the plan to be accomplished ... in other words, because of free will.

1. What do you think the definition of destiny is and why do you think the author is supporting that concept in this book? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Assuming that destiny is true, and that having a vision of what one is to accomplish in life before being born is true but forgotten with birth, explain with examples, why often the purpose of an individual does not come to fruition.

3. Most religions espouse the idea of free will. Those who have no spiritual beliefs would probably agree. Explain the concept of free will, why it might be a law of life and how it seems to manifest in the real world. Use examples to support your answer.

Essay Topic 3

There is a development of what might be called a parallel narrative or subplot - the deepening of the mystery of what happened during that past encounter between Natives and Whites. This subplot functions as all subplots do - to illuminate and define events and/or circumstances in the main narrative, albeit perhaps with more thematic and/or spiritual relevance than most subplots.

1. Explain what you think the above statements mean. Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Do you think the subplot was essential to the book? Why or why not? What did the subplot add?

3. Explain, in depth, what you learned about the characters from the subplot.

4. Do you believe the author has suggested the characters' personalities and behaviors are essentially static from lifetime to lifetime? Why or why not? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

(see the answer keys)

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