The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

James Redfield
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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does the narrator consider telling Maya?

2. Who is Wil?

3. What can the narrator not understand?

4. What does the narrator do the next morning?

5. Who does the narrator encounter where he goes?

Short Essay Questions

1. What does the narrator suggest about the 1960's?

2. What do Wil and the narrator do with Williams and what do they learn about him?

3. What does Long Eagle reveal to the Narrator when he meets him at the falls?

4. What does Wil tell the narrator is the reason for him disappearing in Peru?

5. What does the group do after Charlene explains why she is in the valley?

6. Describe what the four members of the Group first do when they meet at the waterfall and what they see.

7. What does Long Eagle tell the narrator about the valley?

8. What kind of sound does Lipcomb and the narrator hear, what do they see, what does the narrator suggest and what is Lipcomb's response?

9. What does the narrator realize about all his previous lives and what he thinks is needed to change the trend?

10. Describe the vision the narrator had at the beginning of Chapter 6, Part 2.

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

In Chapter 6, and indeed throughout the novel, storytelling can clearly be seen as a function of thematic agenda - what happens happens because the author wants to make his philosophical point. This manifests here perhaps more blatantly and directly from other novels without such overt agendas, but at its core the purpose of storytelling remains the same no matter what story is being told - to awaken some sort of reaction and/or increased insight in the reader.

1. Explain, with examples why the first sentence above is true.

2. Why do you think a novel that overtly has an agenda would use most of the actions of the characters, the subplots, the behaviors and situations to advance that agenda more so than a typical novel.

3. Do you think the purpose of storytelling is the same no matter what story is being told - to awaken some sort of reaction and/or increased insight in the reader? Why or why not?

Essay Topic 2

On the second (spiritual) level of analysis, Chapter 2 introduces the key concepts of the Group of Seven and the Fear, both of which define and motivate the action to follow. Of the two, the Fear is perhaps the more significant, in that as a concept, its influence (according to the book's spiritual perspective) reaches beyond the boundaries of the narrative and into the way the world functions. It is in many ways a spiritual antagonist, if not THE spiritual antagonist, to the enlightenment sought by the characters.

1. Why do you think the Fear could be called the spiritual antagonist to the enlightenment sought by the characters. Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Many religions and philosophies state emphatically that love is the key to the evolution, spiritual advancement or solution to the problems of humanity. There are also those who say fear is the opposite of love. In this context, explain the ways in which the Fear has impeded human evolution. Use examples from the text to support your answer.

3. Explain the key concepts of the Group of Seven and how you think these concepts would be able to overcome the Fear as it is defined by this book.

Essay Topic 3

There is a development of what might be called a parallel narrative or subplot - the deepening of the mystery of what happened during that past encounter between Natives and Whites. This subplot functions as all subplots do - to illuminate and define events and/or circumstances in the main narrative, albeit perhaps with more thematic and/or spiritual relevance than most subplots.

1. Explain what you think the above statements mean. Use examples from the text to support your answer.

2. Do you think the subplot was essential to the book? Why or why not? What did the subplot add?

3. Explain, in depth, what you learned about the characters from the subplot.

4. Do you believe the author has suggested the characters' personalities and behaviors are essentially static from lifetime to lifetime? Why or why not? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

(see the answer keys)

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