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Sharpe's Prey: Richard Sharpe and the Expedition to Copenhagen, 1807 Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 134 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
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Mid-Book Test - Hard

Name: _____________________________ Period: ___________________________

This quiz consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does Lavisser say to Willsen?



2. What does Baird say will ensure Sharpe of advancement?



3. Who is Ole Skovaard?



4. What do Lavisser and a woman do as Sharpe comes into the room where they are torturing Skovaard?



5. What does Sharpe first demand of Hocking before slashing his face?



Short Essay Questions

1. What does Sharpe do and think after fleeing Wapping Steps.



2. What is Captain Willsen doing at the opening of this chapter and why?



3. Why are Astrid and her father shocked at Sharpe's appearance?



4. Describe Sharpe's converstion with Madam Visser.



5. What does Skovaard read to Sharpe out of a Danish newspaper and what does Skovaard do?



6. Why is Sharpe in his present circumstances?



7. What does Captain Dunnett announce to his troops concerning stealing from the Danes. and who appears to have already done so?



8. What does Lavisser say about Skovaard and who defends the man?



9. Who takes a liking to Sharpe among the Danish citizens and how does Sharpe save the man's life?



10. Describe Sharpe's encounter with Hocking when Hocking brings Sharpe a young girl.



Essay Topics

Cornwell is masterful in his description of battles and life in general in for a soldier during the Napoleonic Wars in the early 1800s. Discuss one of the following:

1. Trace and analyze Cornwells's descriptive passages about life as a soldier. How does he use descriptions of the five senses to make the reader feel s/he is there? Do you find his descriptions compelling? Seemingly accurate? How would "Sharpe's Prey" be different if Cornwell did not include such descriptive passages?

2. Analyze Cornwells's descriptive passages about the social structure of the times and discuss what you think it would be like to be a person of wealth and/or privilege such as Wellington, or Dunnet. Contrast that to the lives of those who are in a lower social strata such as Sharpe and Harper or one in service to someone of wealth and/or privilege.

3. Describe and analyze Cornwell's descriptive passages about the topographical setting and the physical descriptions of the people. Does Cornwell do an adequate job of actually making the reader "see" the land/sea where the action is taking place? How about getting a visual image of the characters? How does the descriptions of the setting add to the novel? Do you like having an idea of how a character looks? How would the novel be different without such descriptions?

At the conclusion of a novel, most readers either consciously or unconsciously engage in processing the book and usually come to a conclusion as to whether they like the book or not. Discuss one of the following:

1. Would you consider "Sharpe's Prey" a "good" book? Why or why not? Use examples to illustrate your stance.

2. What do you think are the elements of an outstanding novel? Analyze one of your favorite novels to see if those elements are present.

3. What are some reasons you might consider a novel a failure? Analyze a novel you think is a failure and see if those elements are in that novel.

There are three "villains" in "Sharpe's Prey". Lavisser is a fanatical patriot, Barker seems to be self-serving and Madame Visser is a French spy.

1. Explain, with examples from the text, what you see are the main motivations behind Barker's behavior. If he lived in America today with what crimes do you think he would be charged?

2. Lavisser is a "villain" who does not seem to be motivated by self-interest. Discuss why or why not you believe this statement to be true. Use examples from "Sharpe's Prey" to support and illustrate your opinion.

3. Do you think crimes or immoral behavior motivated by good intentions is more pardonable than that motivated by self-interests? Why or why not? Use examples from "Sharpe's Prey" to support and illustrate your opinion.

(see the answer keys)

This section contains 1,269 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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