Medea Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. Why does Jason say dealing with Medea is hopeless?

2. Who did the Tutor overhear making plans?

3. What does the chorus do when they learn of Medea's plans for revenge?

4. What is Jason's reaction to the plan involving Medea?

5. What prevents Creon from helping Medea or seeing her point of view?

Short Essay Questions

1. Knowing her plans for her children, why do you think Medea asks Jason to beg Creon to allow them to stay?

2. Do you think, with the chorus being so sympathetic to Medea, that it undercuts her claims that her life is more difficult because she is a foreigner? Why or why not?

3. How does the King of Corinth model the theme of selfishness that Euripides introduces in the first scene?

4. Is there any indication that, as Medea claims, the gods know the crimes Jason has committed against her?

5. Why does Medea doubt her ability to trust Aegeus?

6. Does Jason's sudden concern for his children in the final scene seem consistent with the rest of the play? Why or why not?

7. What similarities are evident in the characters of Jason and Medea?

8. To which character(s) is Aegeus a foil? Explain.

9. What do you think the messenger means when he says the princess "smiled at the lifeless image of herself" in the mirror?

10. Is Creon's naming of Medea as a "clever witch" supposed to be taken literally or figuratively?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

Medea invokes the goddess Hecate as she formulates her plan for revenge. Examine why Euripides chooses to link this goddess with his protagonist, being sure to cover the following points; What is Hecate known for; why would Medea turn to this particular goddess; are there similarities between Medea and Hecate; does invoking this goddess alter how the audience views Medea?

Essay Topic 2

It appears as though, sympathetic or not, Medea is representing a type of "Everywoman" character. Argue for whether you believe Medea does or does not effectively represent an "Everywoman", using specific supporting details from the text to support your argument.

Essay Topic 3

How does the author use the structure of the play to his benefit by using the audience's imagination when dealing with horrific acts? Argue for or against this structure as effective, drawing on details from the text and the research you have done over the course of the play's analysis into classical Greek plays.

(see the answer keys)

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