Literary Theory: An Introduction Test | Lesson Plans Mid-Book Test - Easy

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Mid-Book Test - Easy

Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. According to Eagleton, the subject in phenomenology was the source of all what?
(a) Oppression.
(b) Meaning.
(c) Life.
(d) Violence.

2. What kind of language does Eagleton say people think of literature as?
(a) Strange.
(b) Difficult.
(c) Dull.
(d) Ordinary.

3. How do linguists describe the effect of language where "the texture, rhythm and resonance of words are in excess of their abstractable meaning."
(a) "A disproportion between one signifier for every other signified."
(b) "A disproportion between two signifieds."
(c) "A disproportion between two signifiers."
(d) "A disproportion between signifiers and signifieds."

4. What genre of writing does Eagleton provide that is an example of writing that is NOT considered to be literature?
(a) Romance.
(b) Science fiction.
(c) Young Adult.
(d) Comics.

5. What is the name of the economist Eagleton discusses in his preface?
(a) J. M. Keynes.
(b) Adam Smith.
(c) I. Fischer.
(d) Gordon Tuck.

6. According to Eagleton, the sentence "this is awfully squiggly handwriting" from Knut Hamsun's "Hunger" tells him its literary because of what reason?
(a) The facts.
(b) The content.
(c) The context.
(d) The ideas.

7. According to Eagleton, when did the Russian formalists emerge?
(a) Before WWII.
(b) During the Russian Revolution.
(c) After WWI.
(d) Before the Bolshevik Revolution.

8. For the Romantics, why was their vision of a just society was inverted into a nostalgia for an old and "organic" England?
(a) Because their vision of a just society was a corrupted version of industrial capitalism.
(b) Because they lacked the means of transforming industrial capitalism.
(c) Because they were revolutionaries who were imprisoned in the old system.
(d) Because they refused to give up their privilege as writers in industrial society.

9. What is the name of the critic from the Constance school of reception aesthetics and the author of "The Act of Reading" who Eagleton discusses at length?
(a) Wolfgang Iser.
(b) Jean Paul Sartre.
(c) Roland Barthes.
(d) Roman Ingarden.

10. What role does reception theory examine?
(a) The teacher's role.
(b) The author's role.
(c) The reader's role.
(d) The critic's role.

11. Both F.R. Leavis and Edmund Husserl seek to grasp the thing in itself, or the ______for Husserl and ______for Leavis.
(a) Image; eidos.
(b) Idea; essence.
(c) Idea; life.
(d) Eidos; life.

12. According to Eagleton, what is ironic about those who complain of the difficulty of literary theory?
(a) "That those who complain would not expect to understand a textbook of biology or chemical engineering."
(b) "That those who complain are often civilised and educated."
(c) "That those who complain are often uncivilised and uneducated."
(d) "That those who complain would expect to understand a textbook of biology or chemical engineering."

13. Who wrote "What is Literature" on literary reception and was published in 1948?
(a) Jean Paul Sartre.
(b) Wolfgang Iser.
(c) Roland Barthes.
(d) Stanley Fish.

14. According to Eagleton, why did the Russian formalists NOT see a literary work as a vehicle for ideas, reflection of reality, or transcendental truth?
(a) Because they saw language as a mode of speech for the wealthy.
(b) Because they saw language as obtuse, vague, and ephemeral.
(c) Because they saw language as words and not objects or feelings.
(d) Because they saw language as potentially empowering the masses.

15. How far has the "theoretical revolution" spread according to Eagleton?
(a) Within the inner circle of critics and readers.
(b) To the outer circle of critics and readers.
(c) Not beyond the circle of specialists and enthusiasts.
(d) Far beyond the circle of specialists and enthusiasts.

Short Answer Questions

1. According to Eagleton, "in the terminology of reception theory, the reader _________ the literary work, which is in itself no more than a chain of organized black marks on a page."

2. From the viewpoint of Roland Barthes, Eagleton argues that "reading is less like a _______ than a _________."

3. What is the name Edmund Husserl gave to his philosophical method?

4. What novel by John Updike does Eagleton discuss from the position of reception theory?

5. What "twin impacts" does Eagleton cite in the mid-Victorian period that was particularly worrisome to the ruling class?

(see the answer keys)

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