God in the Dock; Essays on Theology and Ethics Test | Final Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. Bulverism is essentially antithetical to what?

2. Overall, Lewis feels that vivisection should be treated in what way?

3. Lewis argues that the character of Christianity suggests what type of a role for God?

4. Lewis states that language from what book needs the most explanation for an outsider to understand it?

5. How many conditions were laid on in the original essay to which Lewis responds in Part IV, Letter 1, "The Conditions for a Just War"?

Short Essay Questions

1. What kind of compulsions does Lewis argue against?

2. According to Lewis' writings in Part II, Essay 1, "Dangers of National Repentance", what dangers does national repentance present?

3. Explain the logical fallacy that Lewis cautions against in Part III, Essay 3, "The Sermon and the Lunch"?

4. Why does Lewis find it important for everyone to read older texts?

5. What practical reasons does Lewis give to reject the idea of women serving as priests?

6. Why does Lewis reject the creation of a Christian political party?

7. What is the problem in the village described in Part IV, Letter 5, "A Village Experience"?

8. Explain some of the problems that Lewis sees as challenges to Christianity in England.

9. Why is Lewis opposed to giving all men a "right to happiness"?

10. Why does Lewis believe that the decline of religion occurring at his time was less dramatic than it appeared?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

Science and religion have been in contention ever since the church began to loose its authority over science due to the work of enlightenment thinkers and scientists. The debate between these apparently opposing world-views raged in Lewis' time and continues unabated to the modern day.

1) Discuss some of the reasons that science and religion come into conflict ideologically.

2) Explain some of the arguments used by both sides to suggest that the opposing viewpoint is invalid.

3) Explain the difference between scientific thought and materialism.

4) Describe the argument that Lewis uses to suggest that science and religion need not be in conflict.

Essay Topic 2

According to Lewis and the scholars he shares correspondence with, suffering appears to be nearly universal in the world. It is not difficult to find human suffering, even in wealthy first-world nations, and animals suffer both in the wild and in human captivity. These scholars agree that the problem of suffering is a significant and important one for Christians, who believe that God is loving and moreover, pure good.

1) Explain the argument that some use to explain how suffering shows that the Christian God does not exist.

2) Describe the counter-arguments made by Lewis and others on this subject, to show that suffering may be an important and necessary component of the world.

3) Assess whether or not suffering is inherently evil, and which position this quality of suffering supports.

Essay Topic 3

Prayer is an essential part of almost every world religion. Lewis emphasizes that idea that in Christianity, many believe that God can be implored to intervene directly in the world, either miraculously or subtly, and that failure to pray can have a bearing on the outcome of an event.

1) Discuss Lewis' opinion about the importance of prayer in Christianity and other major religions.

2) Explain the typical Christian beliefs about prayer and the ways that God can be asked to intervene.

3) Describe the miraculous and mundane ways that Lewis states Christians believe God can and does intervene in human affairs.

4) Discuss the "paradox of prayer" that Lewis describes, and explain how he is able to resolve the paradox.

(see the answer keys)

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