God in the Dock; Essays on Theology and Ethics Test | Final Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. Which of the following is one of the difficulties in engaging the average Englishmen in a theological discussion?

2. In Part II, Essay 16, "Cross-Examination", Lewis specifically denies that an experience of God can be brought on through what means?

3. Lewis believes that sexual permissiveness will eventually result an a society unfriendly to what group?

4. What is the attitude of Christianity towards self-love?

5. What causes previous translations of the bible to become worse?

Short Essay Questions

1. According to Lewis, how do most modern people approach the subject of God, and how should the subject be approached?

2. According to Lewis' writings in Part II, Essay 2, "Two Ways with the Self", what apparent contradiction exists in Christianity regarding self-love, and how is it resolved?

3. Why is Lewis opposed to the commercialism of Christmas?

4. Why does Lewis reject the creation of a Christian political party?

5. What reasons does Lewis give for being uninterested in hymns?

6. Why does Lewis find it important for everyone to read older texts?

7. What is Lewis' opinion about Christian literature?

8. Explain some of the problems that Lewis sees as challenges to Christianity in England.

9. What kind of compulsions does Lewis argue against?

10. Explain the logical fallacy that Lewis cautions against in Part III, Essay 3, "The Sermon and the Lunch"?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

National repentance is the phenomenon of a nation's citizens feeling as if they must each personally atone for the wrongs of the nation as a whole. Although this guilt and the consequent repentance often makes people feel good, Lewis argues that it is undesirable and dangerous.

1) Explain the concept of national repentance and why it was prominent in Lewis' time.

2) Discuss the positive aspects that Lewis believes national repentance can bring about and what it is intended to achieve.

3) Discuss the problems that Lewis sees in national repentance. Explain how it can act as a distraction from real spiritual matters, and detail Lewis' arguments against it.

Essay Topic 2

Lewis explains that "witnessing" is the Christian practice of sharing the "good news" as expressed by Jesus in the New Testament with those who are outside of the church, attempting to educate and convert them to the Christian faith. Lewis contends that Christians are specifically commanded to pursue this practice, and that failure to do so has serious consequences for themselves and those they fail to convert.

1) Explain the concept of witnessing within the Christian church that Lewis describes. Explain its practices, aims, and target audience.

2) Discuss Lewis' view on the importance of witnessing for Christians.

3) Describe some of the difficulties that Christians experienced in "witnessing" in England in Lewis' time, and discuss techniques that Lewis recommends in order to surmount these difficulties.

Essay Topic 3

According to Lewis and the scholars he shares correspondence with, suffering appears to be nearly universal in the world. It is not difficult to find human suffering, even in wealthy first-world nations, and animals suffer both in the wild and in human captivity. These scholars agree that the problem of suffering is a significant and important one for Christians, who believe that God is loving and moreover, pure good.

1) Explain the argument that some use to explain how suffering shows that the Christian God does not exist.

2) Describe the counter-arguments made by Lewis and others on this subject, to show that suffering may be an important and necessary component of the world.

3) Assess whether or not suffering is inherently evil, and which position this quality of suffering supports.

(see the answer keys)

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