God in the Dock; Essays on Theology and Ethics Test | Lesson Plans Mid-Book Test - Hard

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Mid-Book Test - Hard

Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What surprised Lewis about the club that he formed?

2. In Part I, Essay 23 "Must Our Image of God Go?", Lewis argues against what type of an interpretation of the scripture?

3. How do secularism and paganism compare to Christianity as belief systems, according to Lewis?

4. Lewis hoped that his club would adopt what type of a political viewpoint?

5. Lewis contends that Corineous intends to treat Christianity in what way?

Short Essay Questions

1. What mistakes does Lewis believe that the Bishop of Woolwich makes in his arguments about scripture?

2. According to Lewis' writings in Part II, Essay 1, "Dangers of National Repentance", what dangers does national repentance present?

3. According to Lewis' writings in Part II, Essay 2, "Two Ways with the Self", what apparent contradiction exists in Christianity regarding self-love, and how is it resolved?

4. What argument does Lewis make to suggest that science incapable of invalidating religion?

5. How is Christianity transmitted, according to Lewis' writings in Part I, Essay 13, "On the Transmission of Christianity"?

6. According to Lewis' writings in Part I, Essay 17, "Answers to Question on Christianity", what is problematic for Christians about healing the sick, and why is this action acceptable anyways?

7. Explain one example of the problem with trying too hard to look at a problem "behind the scenes".

8. Why does Lewis believe that philosophy alone is insufficient for faith?

9. What problem does Lewis identify in the rules discussed in Part IV, Letter 1, "Conditions for a Just War"?

10. Why does Lewis believe that the gospels are not legend?

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

Dogma is the more or less unchanging set of beliefs and rules that establish and maintain a religion's identity. Although often vehemently despised by materialist thinkers and liberal churches, Lewis contends that dogma is an important component of faith and essential for a mature religion.

1) Explain what dogma is, especially in the Christian church, and how and why is remains unchanging. Explain one element of Christian dogma that has not changed significantly in a very long time.

2) Discuss the problems that outsiders, liberal thinkers, and materials have with dogma.

3) Explain how dogma aids a religion in maintaining its cohesion, and explain Lewis' suggestion that dogma's unchanging nature is a strength, and not a weakness.

Essay Topic 2

The theory of humanitarian punishment emphasizes rehabilitation and therapy for criminals. Although many can empathize with this approach, Lewis contends that there are significant practical problems that it can lead to.

1) Explain the humanitarian theory of punishment and how it differs from traditional method of punishment. What type of punishment would most criminals prefer to have brought against them?

2) Discuss some of the reasons that Lewis gives to explain why the humanitarian theory is embraced and supported. What apparent advantages does it have?

3) Explain in detail Lewis' argument against this approach to punishment, and describe the problems that he associates with it.

Essay Topic 3

Bulverism is the flawed argumentative technique of assuming that the opponent is wrong and then merely explaining how that person came to that flawed belief. Although this technique may sway audiences, and even cause a person to question their beliefs, it does nothing to determine the relative truth of an issue.

1) Explain the concept of Bulverism, how it is employed, and why it is flawed as a method of argument.

2) Discuss some of the common uses of Bulverism in debate, including a discussion of particular subjects that are especially vulnerable to this type of attack.

3) Speculate as to why a person might resort to Bulverism, and whether or not one who argues in this way is arguing honestly and in good faith.

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