From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in Twentieth-century America Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

Beth L. Bailey
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This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. According to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money,” the centrality of what in dating had important implications?
(a) Money.
(b) Sex.
(c) Automobiles.
(d) The telephone.

2. What control was reduced with the advent of the dating system, according to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money"?
(a) Religious control.
(b) Self control.
(c) Moral control.
(d) Parental control.

3. The protocol for going steady was strict and often involved what, according to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating”?
(a) A visible token.
(b) The church’s blessing.
(c) Written vows.
(d) Life and death experiences.

4. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” America's culture of consumption sees paired acts as opportunities for what?
(a) Lasting friendship.
(b) Mutual gain.
(c) New experiences.
(d) Disagreements.

5. The new practice of going steady entirely destroyed what system according to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating”?
(a) The courting system.
(b) The marriage system.
(c) The call system.
(d) The dating-rating system.

Short Answer Questions

1. What constantly portrayed the other sex as commodities, according to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date”?

2. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” American public culture since the 1920s reiterated that women should compete for men by doing what?

3. According to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating,” the most popular students went steady, while others tried to avoid being what?

4. According to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money,” dating was a response of lower classes to the pressures of what?

5. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” a date meant what?

Short Essay Questions

1. How did dating change the power distribution of courtship according to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money"?

2. How did the importance of female appearance evolve during the twentieth century, according to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date"?

3. What role did money have in American dating when it emerged? How was a date defined at this time, according to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date"?

4. How did the system of dating evolve after World War II? Why did it evolve?

5. What did Beth Bailey and her fellow discussants state about the transformation of courtship when she appeared on television in the 1970s?

6. How did competition on the dance floor evolve after World War II?

7. How does the author describe the objectification of the sexes in contemporary society in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date"?

8. What arguments did experts make regarding the public nature of dating, according to the author in the Introduction?

9. How was the system of dating perceived in the 1950s? What was the basis of the dating system?

10. What system of courtship dominated the American lifestyle prior to the mid-1920s? How did dating change this system?

(see the answer keys)

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