From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in Twentieth-century America Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

Beth L. Bailey
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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. According to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money,” the word date entered the vocabulary of the middle class initially through what group of people?
(a) Nuns.
(b) Sorority girls.
(c) Fraternity boys.
(d) Sociologists.

2. From Front Porch to Back Seat concerns America’s system of courtship principally between what years?
(a) 1920-1965.
(b) 1860-1915.
(c) 1960-2000.
(d) 1945-1980.

3. What became the basis of the dating system, according to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money"?
(a) Women’s intelligence.
(b) Women’s beauty.
(c) Men’s money.
(d) Men’s attractiveness.

4. Going steady threatened parents who believed in what, according to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating”?
(a) Not marrying out of state.
(b) Waiting to get married.
(c) Marrying inside one’s religion.
(d) Marrying early.

5. The fact that men paid for dates was thought to imply that women owed them what, according to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money"?
(a) Allegiance.
(b) Money.
(c) A dowry.
(d) Sexual favors.

6. What courtship events does the author describe in colleges in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date”?
(a) Dances.
(b) Exams.
(c) Graduations.
(d) Football games.

7. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” in the 1950s and 1960s, what became highly prized?
(a) The Native American girl.
(b) The large-breasted girl.
(c) The African American girl.
(d) The small-footed girl.

8. According to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating,” often competitive success in the dating system was demonstrated where?
(a) City parks.
(b) The movie theater.
(c) The bowling alley.
(d) The dance floor.

9. Beth Bailey notes that contemporary women are sexually objectified based upon what in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date"?
(a) Their religion.
(b) Their appearance.
(c) Their intelligence.
(d) Their wealth.

10. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” American dating emerged as what became central to courtship?
(a) Looks.
(b) Manners.
(c) Money.
(d) Social connections.

11. In the calling system, who took the initiative according to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money"?
(a) Parents.
(b) Women.
(c) Men.
(d) Friends.

12. According to the author in Chapter 3, "The Worth of a Date,” a date meant what?
(a) The girl pays.
(b) The boy pays for the girl.
(c) The boy drives.
(d) The father chaperones.

13. According to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating,” the most popular students went steady, while others tried to avoid being what?
(a) Square.
(b) Broke.
(c) Noticed.
(d) Different.

14. According to the author in Chapter 1, "Calling Cards and Money,” dating was a response of lower classes to the pressures of what?
(a) Religious standards.
(b) Urban-industrial America.
(c) Rural boredom.
(d) Teenage pregnancy.

15. By 1959, nearly half of all women married before what age, according to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating”?
(a) 22.
(b) 27.
(c) 19.
(d) 30.

Short Answer Questions

1. The author states that by what decade did Americans begin to think dating was universal though it was only three decades old?

2. According to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating,” after World War II, what became considered a rude behavior?

3. The generational battle surrounding going steady boiled down to what, according to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating”?

4. According to the author in Chapter 2, "The Economy of Dating,” after returning from World War II, American college men saw their coed women as what?

5. According to the author in the Introduction, the new systems of courtship were tied to an understanding of what?

(see the answer keys)

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