Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What is part of the reader's experience of the milieu?
(a) The normalcy and unpredictability of the characters.
(b) The strangeness and unfamiliarity of the characters.
(c) The strangeness and familiarity of the characters.
(d) The normalcy and predictability of the characters.

2. What must a storyteller do when creating characters or events?
(a) Broaden the theme.
(b) Understand and define the implications of the plot.
(c) Broaden the plot.
(d) Understand and define the theme.

3. How does the author describe what it means to "raise the stakes"?
(a) Increasing what a character has to lose or gain.
(b) Increasing what a character has to lose, but not to gain.
(c) Increasing what a character has gained.
(d) Increasing what a character has lost.

4. How will the story itself suggest characters?
(a) According to the ending of a story.
(b) According to the beginning of a story.
(c) According to what needs to happen and how it needs to take place.
(d) According to what needs to happen, but not how it needs to take place.

5. In defining a fictional character, what causes people to behave differently?
(a) The network they are in.
(b) Their age.
(c) Their education.
(d) The society they live in.

6. What does the author think can also provide ideas for additional characters?
(a) The pasts of central characters.
(b) The future of central characters.
(c) The future of supporting characters.
(d) The pasts of supporting characters.

7. What does the writer use with words to achieve his/her main goals?
(a) Structure.
(b) Grammar.
(c) Research.
(d) Poetic license.

8. What kinds of situations can make a character more interesting?
(a) Ones that the character and the reader are expecting.
(b) Ones that the reader is unaccustomed with.
(c) Ones that the character has been in before.
(d) Ones that the character is unaccustomed with.

9. Which one of the following is not an example of a character trait that will gain an emotional connection with the reader?
(a) Cleverness.
(b) Ambiguity.
(c) Negativity.
(d) Positive attitude.

10. How many basic factors are there common to all forms of narrative writing?
(a) Two.
(b) Four.
(c) Six.
(d) Eight.

11. What does the contract between an author and a reader state?
(a) That the narrative will have a happy ending.
(b) That the narrative will reach a conclusion.
(c) That the narrative will introduce less characters.
(d) That the narrative will introduce more characters.

12. What balance must be met when creating an endearing character?
(a) The balance between right and wrong.
(b) The balance between loss and hope.
(c) The balance between victimization and courage.
(d) The balance between a leader and a follower.

13. How does the author describe writing based on an issue?
(a) A distracting source of characters.
(b) A tricky source of characters.
(c) A misleading source of characters.
(d) An ambiguous source of characters.

14. What part of a character's name provides a clear starting point for defining that character's context?
(a) The middle name.
(b) The first name.
(c) The last name.
(d) The reason they were given the name.

15. In order to avoid being boring, what does a character have to be?
(a) Aggressive and mysterious.
(b) Unfamiliar and idiosyncratic.
(c) Familiar and idiosyncratic.
(d) Passive and mysterious.

Short Answer Questions

1. What place can writers use as inspiration for their characters?

2. Why is it necessary for a reader to care about the characters in a narrative?

3. How often are sources of inspiration altered?

4. What will help a writer to maintain consistency?

5. What is one of the problems with writing based on an issue?

(see the answer keys)

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