Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 138 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Buy the Characters and Viewpoint Lesson Plans
Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. Which one of the following is not an example of a story where milieu is the prime narrative?
(a) Fantasy.
(b) Western.
(c) Mystery.
(d) Science-fiction.

2. Besides context, what else can a name provide for a character?
(a) Background.
(b) Intentions.
(c) Beliefs.
(d) Preferences.

3. What must accompany self-sacrifice in an engaging character?
(a) Mystery.
(b) Reason.
(c) Desperation.
(d) Sympathy.

4. What kind of characterization is needed in a narrative that features the characters as the primary focus?
(a) Detailed, but simple.
(b) Less detailed and simple.
(c) Detailed and complex.
(d) Less detailed, but complex.

5. How does the author define an idea?
(a) What the reader is not intended to understand and/or learn.
(b) What the reader is intended to understand and/or learn.
(c) What the reader is intended to understand, but not necessarily learn.
(d) What the reader is intended to learn, but not necessarily understand.

6. How many basic types of characters are there?
(a) Three.
(b) Four.
(c) One.
(d) Two.

7. What must a writer define in creative writing?
(a) Style and point of view, but not tone.
(b) Tone and point of view, but not style.
(c) Style and tone, but not point of view.
(d) Style, tone, and point of view.

8. What does the author hope to give writers who read the book?
(a) A set of tools.
(b) A specific set of instructions.
(c) A secret formula.
(d) A popular method.

9. How necessary is it for characters to be more than stereotypes in a narrative where an idea is the primary focus?
(a) The characters are never more than stereotypes in a narrative.
(b) Very necessary.
(c) Rarely necessary.
(d) Somewhat necessary.

10. Why should sources of inspiration be altered?
(a) To make them more mysterious.
(b) To make them more familiar.
(c) To make them more effective.
(d) To make them more unrealistic

11. What kinds of situations can make a character more interesting?
(a) Ones that the character and the reader are expecting.
(b) Ones that the character is unaccustomed with.
(c) Ones that the reader is unaccustomed with.
(d) Ones that the character has been in before.

12. What can other characters provide for the main character?
(a) Conflict or assistance.
(b) Conflict, but never assistance.
(c) Assistance, but never conflict.
(d) Neither conflict nor assistance.

13. With what does the author intend to help writers?
(a) Writing shorter novels.
(b) Writing longer novels.
(c) Fulfilling their responsibilities.
(d) Rating their work.

14. What part of a character's name provides a clear starting point for defining that character's context?
(a) The last name.
(b) The first name.
(c) The middle name.
(d) The reason they were given the name.

15. What is a narrative that is focused on an event trying to make sense of?
(a) Chaos.
(b) Intentions.
(c) Ideas.
(d) Milieu.

Short Answer Questions

1. What are three good example of character definition in fiction?

2. How many of the basic elements of a narrative does milieu incorporate?

3. What happens to sources of inspiration once they are incorporated into characters?

4. When an idea is the primary focus, what is the role of the characters?

5. Which one of the following is not an example of a character trait that will gain an emotional connection with the reader?

(see the answer keys)

This section contains 556 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Characters and Viewpoint Lesson Plans
Copyrights
BookRags
Characters and Viewpoint from BookRags. (c)2017 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook