Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What is milieu?
(a) The mental, historical, or social context.
(b) The physical, historical, or social context.
(c) The physical, cultural, or social context.
(d) The mental, cultural, or social context.

2. What kind of characterization is needed in a narrative that features the characters as the primary focus?
(a) Detailed and complex.
(b) Less detailed and simple.
(c) Detailed, but simple.
(d) Less detailed, but complex.

3. What does the contract between an author and a reader state?
(a) That the narrative will introduce less characters.
(b) That the narrative will reach a conclusion.
(c) That the narrative will have a happy ending.
(d) That the narrative will introduce more characters.

4. Which of the following is not an example of a broad stroke definition?
(a) Antagonistic/responsive.
(b) Male/female.
(c) Old/young.
(d) Big/small.

5. How does the author describe what it means to "raise the stakes"?
(a) Increasing what a character has to lose, but not to gain.
(b) Increasing what a character has to lose or gain.
(c) Increasing what a character has gained.
(d) Increasing what a character has lost.

6. What is the function of a major character?
(a) To be believable, but not necessarily interesting.
(b) To be neither interesting nor believable.
(c) To be interesting and believable.
(d) To be interesting, but not necessarily believable.

7. What type of reputation can a character have?
(a) One that is not deserved.
(b) One that is deserved.
(c) Deserved or not deserved.
(d) A character should not have a reputation.

8. What happens to sources of inspiration once they are incorporated into characters?
(a) They are added to or completely changed.
(b) They are added to, exaggerated, or completely changed.
(c) They are added to or exaggerated.
(d) They are exaggerated or completely changed.

9. What two things should a writer be open to translating into their characters and stories?
(a) Impossibility and the unknown.
(b) Possibility and the unknown.
(c) Impossibility and insight.
(d) Possibility and insight.

10. What does the writer use with words to achieve his/her main goals?
(a) Structure.
(b) Grammar.
(c) Poetic license.
(d) Research.

11. How should a character's traits be designed in order to engage the reader?
(a) Different than the intended audience.
(b) Different than other characters.
(c) Similar to the intended audience.
(d) Similar to other characters.

12. Which one of the following is not an example of a character trait that will gain an emotional connection with the reader?
(a) Cleverness.
(b) Positive attitude.
(c) Ambiguity.
(d) Negativity.

13. Which one of the following is not an example the author uses as a way to add emotional intensity to a character?
(a) Mistakes.
(b) Signs.
(c) Omens.
(d) Symbols.

14. What part of a character's name provides a clear starting point for defining that character's context?
(a) The middle name.
(b) The first name.
(c) The reason they were given the name.
(d) The last name.

15. How does Chapter 1 end?
(a) With the value of a character's physical appearance.
(b) With the insignificance of a character's previous experiences.
(c) With the value of a character's previous experiences.
(d) With the insignificance of a character's physical appearance.

Short Answer Questions

1. What type of reaction will an audience have to a character with opposing characteristics?

2. What kind of jeopardy can a character be placed in to evoke an emotional response from the reader?

3. What is the author's theory about fiction in Chapter 5?

4. How well do readers want to know characters in a book?

5. What should the writer's own experiences have in order to be used as fictional inspiration?

(see the answer keys)

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