Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. According to the author, what is an engaging narrative never about?
(a) Ordinary people doing ordinary things for extraordinary reasons.
(b) Extraordinary people doing ordinary things for extraordinary reasons.
(c) Ordinary people doing extraordinary things for extraordinary reasons.
(d) Ordinary people doing ordinary things for ordinary reasons.

2. What type of imperfections can be appealing to readers?
(a) Unknown.
(b) Endearing.
(c) Uncontrollable.
(d) Temporary.

3. In defining a fictional character, what causes people to behave differently?
(a) The society they live in.
(b) Their education.
(c) Their age.
(d) The network they are in.

4. How many of the basic elements of a narrative does milieu incorporate?
(a) All of them.
(b) One of them.
(c) None of them.
(d) Three of them.

5. Which of the following is not an example of a minor character's function?
(a) To offer information.
(b) To define the main theme.
(c) To act as a love interest.
(d) To create suspense.

6. What will help a writer to maintain consistency?
(a) Not having more than four supporting characters.
(b) Not having more than three central characters.
(c) Keeping a list of character traits and facts.
(d) Keeping a list of character names.

7. What kind of jeopardy can a character be placed in to evoke an emotional response from the reader?
(a) Only emotional and unbelievable.
(b) Physical or emotional, but unbelievable.
(c) Physical or emotional, but believable.
(d) Only physical and believable.

8. Which one of the following is not an example of a character trait that will gain an emotional connection with the reader?
(a) Cleverness.
(b) Ambiguity.
(c) Positive attitude.
(d) Negativity.

9. Which one of the following is not an example of a story where milieu is the prime narrative?
(a) Fantasy.
(b) Science-fiction.
(c) Mystery.
(d) Western.

10. What kinds of situations can make a character more interesting?
(a) Ones that the reader is unaccustomed with.
(b) Ones that the character is unaccustomed with.
(c) Ones that the character has been in before.
(d) Ones that the character and the reader are expecting.

11. How is the event described?
(a) What happens in the narrative and when.
(b) What happens outside of the narrative and why.
(c) What happens outside of the narrative and when.
(d) What happens in the narrative and why.

12. What does the author hope to give writers who read the book?
(a) A popular method.
(b) A set of tools.
(c) A specific set of instructions.
(d) A secret formula.

13. When an idea is the primary focus, what is the role of the characters?
(a) They define the plot completely.
(b) Complex plot functionaries.
(c) They define the plot in some way.
(d) Simple plot functionaries.

14. What determines the amount of characterization in an event?
(a) The timing of the event.
(b) The importance of the event.
(c) The number of pages.
(d) The desire of the author.

15. How many basic types of characters are there?
(a) Four.
(b) Three.
(c) One.
(d) Two.

Short Answer Questions

1. On a basic level, which one of the following defines character in a narrative?

2. How should a character's traits be designed in order to engage the reader?

3. In a story where character is the primary focus, how many characters need to be fully developed?

4. What type of reputation can a character have?

5. What is part of the reader's experience of the milieu?

(see the answer keys)

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