Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What type of physical appearance can make a character more engaging?
(a) Appealing, but vague.
(b) Appealing and blatant.
(c) Appealing and specific.
(d) Appealing and subtle.

2. How does the author define an idea?
(a) What the reader is intended to learn, but not necessarily understand.
(b) What the reader is intended to understand, but not necessarily learn.
(c) What the reader is intended to understand and/or learn.
(d) What the reader is not intended to understand and/or learn.

3. Which one of the following is not a powerful resource for finding characters listed by the author?
(a) The writer's feelings.
(b) The writer's self.
(c) The writer's previous works.
(d) The writer's unrelated memories.

4. What is the function of a major character?
(a) To be neither interesting nor believable.
(b) To be interesting, but not necessarily believable.
(c) To be interesting and believable.
(d) To be believable, but not necessarily interesting.

5. What two things should a writer be open to translating into their characters and stories?
(a) Possibility and insight.
(b) Possibility and the unknown.
(c) Impossibility and insight.
(d) Impossibility and the unknown.

6. Which one of the following is not an example of a story where an idea is the primary narrative?
(a) Detective.
(b) Western.
(c) Caper.
(d) Mystery.

7. According to the quote that ends Chapter 3, where does the author believe a writer can find wonderful stories?
(a) Very few landscapes on earth.
(b) Most landscapes on earth.
(c) No landscapes on earth.
(d) Any landscape on earth.

8. How will the story itself suggest characters?
(a) According to the beginning of a story.
(b) According to what needs to happen, but not how it needs to take place.
(c) According to the ending of a story.
(d) According to what needs to happen and how it needs to take place.

9. Which one of the following is not an example of a character trait that will gain an emotional connection with the reader?
(a) Ambiguity.
(b) Negativity.
(c) Cleverness.
(d) Positive attitude.

10. What is likely to cause an audience to connect with a character emotionally?
(a) Unexplained characteristics and/or thoughts.
(b) Appealing characteristics and/or values.
(c) Appealing characteristics and/or thoughts.
(d) Unexplained characteristics and/or values.

11. What is one of the problems with writing based on an issue?
(a) The characters embody neither attitudes nor perspectives.
(b) The characters tend to embody attitudes or perspectives.
(c) The characters tend to embody perspectives with no attitudes.
(d) The characters tend to embody attitudes with no perspectives.

12. What can other characters provide for the main character?
(a) Conflict, but never assistance.
(b) Conflict or assistance.
(c) Neither conflict nor assistance.
(d) Assistance, but never conflict.

13. What type of reputation can a character have?
(a) Deserved or not deserved.
(b) One that is deserved.
(c) A character should not have a reputation.
(d) One that is not deserved.

14. What should the writer's own experiences have in order to be used as fictional inspiration?
(a) Emotional, theoretical, or experiential connection with a character.
(b) Emotional, spiritual, or experiential connection with a character.
(c) Theoretical, spiritual, or experiential connection with a character.
(d) Emotional, theoretical, or spiritual connection with a character.

15. What is the author's theory about fiction in Chapter 5?
(a) Fiction and reality can only coexist without order.
(b) Order in fiction helps us create order in reality.
(c) Order in reality helps us create order in fiction.
(d) Fiction and reality cannot coexist without order.

Short Answer Questions

1. Why is it necessary for a reader to care about the characters in a narrative?

2. In an event-driven narrative, what is the goal of the characters?

3. What type of reaction will an audience have to a character with opposing characteristics?

4. What type of pain and suffering for a character causes the reader's emotional investment to expand?

5. Which of the following is not an example of a broad stroke definition?

(see the answer keys)

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