Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What do walk-ons lend to a narrative?
(a) Realism.
(b) Unpredictability.
(c) Questions.
(d) Depth.

2. How does the author describe what it means to "raise the stakes"?
(a) Increasing what a character has to lose, but not to gain.
(b) Increasing what a character has lost.
(c) Increasing what a character has gained.
(d) Increasing what a character has to lose or gain.

3. What must accompany self-sacrifice in an engaging character?
(a) Mystery.
(b) Sympathy.
(c) Reason.
(d) Desperation.

4. What two things should a writer be open to translating into their characters and stories?
(a) Impossibility and the unknown.
(b) Possibility and the unknown.
(c) Possibility and insight.
(d) Impossibility and insight.

5. How many different aspects of creative writing are there?
(a) Five.
(b) Two.
(c) Three.
(d) Four.

6. What does the contract between an author and a reader state?
(a) That the narrative will introduce less characters.
(b) That the narrative will introduce more characters.
(c) That the narrative will have a happy ending.
(d) That the narrative will reach a conclusion.

7. Which one of the following triggers a negative reaction from readers?
(a) A character who is confusing.
(b) A character who confuses others.
(c) A character who is controlled by others.
(d) A character who wants power or control.

8. Why does a character in a novel pursue a transformation in his/her life?
(a) His/her role has become unpredictable.
(b) His/her role has become unbearable.
(c) His/her role has become complicated.
(d) His/her role has become insignificant.

9. Besides context, what else can a name provide for a character?
(a) Background.
(b) Intentions.
(c) Preferences.
(d) Beliefs.

10. In defining a fictional character, what causes people to behave differently?
(a) Their age.
(b) The network they are in.
(c) The society they live in.
(d) Their education.

11. What do the most engaging characters reveal about themselves?
(a) Fearlessness.
(b) Unknown fears.
(c) A heroic side.
(d) Unknown flaws.

12. How does the author define an idea?
(a) What the reader is intended to learn, but not necessarily understand.
(b) What the reader is intended to understand, but not necessarily learn.
(c) What the reader is intended to understand and/or learn.
(d) What the reader is not intended to understand and/or learn.

13. Why should sources of inspiration be altered?
(a) To make them more effective.
(b) To make them more unrealistic
(c) To make them more mysterious.
(d) To make them more familiar.

14. What happens to sources of inspiration once they are incorporated into characters?
(a) They are added to or completely changed.
(b) They are exaggerated or completely changed.
(c) They are added to or exaggerated.
(d) They are added to, exaggerated, or completely changed.

15. What is a narrative that is focused on an event trying to make sense of?
(a) Ideas.
(b) Milieu.
(c) Chaos.
(d) Intentions.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does the author think can also provide ideas for additional characters?

2. What will help a writer to maintain consistency?

3. What can other characters provide for the main character?

4. Why is it necessary for a reader to care about the characters in a narrative?

5. What is the function of a major character?

(see the answer keys)

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