Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What part of a character's name provides a clear starting point for defining that character's context?
(a) The reason they were given the name.
(b) The first name.
(c) The last name.
(d) The middle name.

2. What is part of the reader's experience of the milieu?
(a) The strangeness and unfamiliarity of the characters.
(b) The normalcy and predictability of the characters.
(c) The normalcy and unpredictability of the characters.
(d) The strangeness and familiarity of the characters.

3. What does the author think about characters from unrelated ideas?
(a) It is both possible and interesting to put them together.
(b) It is neither possible nor interesting to put them together.
(c) It would be interesting, but it is not possible to put them together.
(d) It is possible to put them together, but not interesting.

4. Which of the following is not an example of a broad stroke definition?
(a) Male/female.
(b) Old/young.
(c) Antagonistic/responsive.
(d) Big/small.

5. What type of physical appearance can make a character more engaging?
(a) Appealing and blatant.
(b) Appealing and subtle.
(c) Appealing and specific.
(d) Appealing, but vague.

6. Which one of the following is not a powerful resource for finding characters listed by the author?
(a) The writer's previous works.
(b) The writer's unrelated memories.
(c) The writer's feelings.
(d) The writer's self.

7. Which one of the following is not an example of a story where milieu is the prime narrative?
(a) Western.
(b) Science-fiction.
(c) Fantasy.
(d) Mystery.

8. What kind of narrative should a storyteller use?
(a) Effective and engaging.
(b) Effective and condensed.
(c) Effective and poetic.
(d) Effective and involved.

9. What is likely to cause an audience to connect with a character emotionally?
(a) Unexplained characteristics and/or thoughts.
(b) Appealing characteristics and/or values.
(c) Unexplained characteristics and/or values.
(d) Appealing characteristics and/or thoughts.

10. What do the two questions the author poses at the end of Chapter 2 add to a novel?
(a) Practical interest for the background of a character.
(b) Dramatic interest for the characters and events.
(c) Practical interest for the characters and events.
(d) Dramatic interest for the background of a character.

11. How does the author describe writing based on an issue?
(a) A tricky source of characters.
(b) A misleading source of characters.
(c) An ambiguous source of characters.
(d) A distracting source of characters.

12. In a story where character is the primary focus, how many characters need to be fully developed?
(a) Not all of them.
(b) At least half of them.
(c) Very few of them.
(d) None of them.

13. What kind of story does the author use as an example of how a story can suggest characters?
(a) Unwilling confinement.
(b) Natural disaster.
(c) Murder.
(d) Space adventure.

14. How does the author describe the act of creative writing in the Introduction?
(a) As a solitary act.
(b) As a collaborative act.
(c) As a limited act.
(d) As an unlimited act.

15. What type of reaction will an audience have to a character with opposing characteristics?
(a) Immediate, but not necessarily negative.
(b) Slow, but mostly negative.
(c) They may not respond at all.
(d) Immediate and negative.

Short Answer Questions

1. What is the function of a major character?

2. According to the author, where do characters come from?

3. What balance must be met when creating an endearing character?

4. What will help a writer to maintain consistency?

5. What is one of the problems with writing based on an issue?

(see the answer keys)

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