Characters and Viewpoint Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. How many basic factors are there common to all forms of narrative writing?
(a) Two.
(b) Eight.
(c) Six.
(d) Four.

2. As what is the idea of hierarchy defined?
(a) A guideline to the amount of narrative each character receives.
(b) A guideline to how many characters to include in a narrative.
(c) A guideline to the role a character plays in the plot.
(d) A guideline to which characters to introduce first in a narrative.

3. How necessary is it for characters to be more than stereotypes in a narrative where an idea is the primary focus?
(a) Very necessary.
(b) Rarely necessary.
(c) The characters are never more than stereotypes in a narrative.
(d) Somewhat necessary.

4. How is the event described?
(a) What happens in the narrative and when.
(b) What happens outside of the narrative and when.
(c) What happens outside of the narrative and why.
(d) What happens in the narrative and why.

5. What must accompany self-sacrifice in an engaging character?
(a) Mystery.
(b) Reason.
(c) Sympathy.
(d) Desperation.

6. How will the story itself suggest characters?
(a) According to what needs to happen, but not how it needs to take place.
(b) According to the beginning of a story.
(c) According to what needs to happen and how it needs to take place.
(d) According to the ending of a story.

7. In order to avoid being boring, what does a character have to be?
(a) Unfamiliar and idiosyncratic.
(b) Aggressive and mysterious.
(c) Passive and mysterious.
(d) Familiar and idiosyncratic.

8. How does the author define an idea?
(a) What the reader is intended to understand and/or learn.
(b) What the reader is intended to learn, but not necessarily understand.
(c) What the reader is intended to understand, but not necessarily learn.
(d) What the reader is not intended to understand and/or learn.

9. What can cause a reader to become more engaged with a character?
(a) Making what is happening to a character more important to another character.
(b) Making what is happening to a character more important to that character.
(c) Making what is happening to a character more important to all other characters.
(d) Making what is happening to a character more important to only the minor characters.

10. According to the author, what is an engaging narrative never about?
(a) Ordinary people doing ordinary things for extraordinary reasons.
(b) Extraordinary people doing ordinary things for extraordinary reasons.
(c) Ordinary people doing ordinary things for ordinary reasons.
(d) Ordinary people doing extraordinary things for extraordinary reasons.

11. What do walk-ons lend to a narrative?
(a) Questions.
(b) Depth.
(c) Unpredictability.
(d) Realism.

12. What does having more complex characters lead to?
(a) More confusion.
(b) More possibilities.
(c) Less possibilities.
(d) Less confusion.

13. What happens to sources of inspiration once they are incorporated into characters?
(a) They are added to or exaggerated.
(b) They are added to or completely changed.
(c) They are added to, exaggerated, or completely changed.
(d) They are exaggerated or completely changed.

14. What place can writers use as inspiration for their characters?
(a) Observation, but not memory.
(b) Memory, but not observation.
(c) Observation and another person's memory.
(d) Observation and memory.

15. In defining a fictional character, what causes people to behave differently?
(a) The network they are in.
(b) The society they live in.
(c) Their age.
(d) Their education.

Short Answer Questions

1. What is part of the reader's experience of the milieu?

2. What should the writer's own experiences have in order to be used as fictional inspiration?

3. Besides context, what else can a name provide for a character?

4. In Chapter 8, how does the author want the reader to be engaged with a character?

5. What type of imperfections can be appealing to readers?

(see the answer keys)

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