Antigone Test | Lesson Plans Mid-Book Test - Hard

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Mid-Book Test - Hard

Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does Ismene say she can't do in Part 3?

2. In Part 2, what is one of the things Antigone says her family told her not to do?

3. How is Antigone's sister described in Part 1?

4. Who confronts Antigone in the beginning of Part 2?

5. What is Creon's wife doing when she is introduced?

Short Essay Questions

1. Elaborate on the purpose of the play's vague setting.

2. The relationship between Antigone and Haemon is complicated. Despite his vows of love, Antigone cannot bring herself to believe that Haemon would choose her over Ismene. In Part 3, what does Antigone do to test Haemon?

3. What is the moment of crisis as described in "Antigone"?

4. What remains for Creon to do after the deaths of his wife, his son and his niece?

5. How is Antigone to be put to death, and how does she feel about it?

6. What is the function of the Guardsmen? Consider their dialogue, their interaction with the "major" players, the Chorus' comments on them, and so on.

7. How do Haemon and Antigone view Creon's life?

8. Prophecy is a large part of the story of Oedipus, his children, and the city of Thebes. A complicated and convoluted story, Oedipus's fate, and hence that of his children and Thebes, was foretold long before his birth and began with Oedipus's father, Laius's, evil act of kidnapping and murdering his friend's young son. In Part 2, the reader begins to get a feel for the inevitability of this curse and its after effects on the city of Thebes. What are Antigone's feelings about this curse as shown in Part 2?

9. Ismene asks Antigone if she has considered some of the possible ramifications of her actions. What were the ramifications that Ismene was asking about, and how does Antigone react to the question?

10. Why does the author expose the character's fates in the beginning?

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

Describe Creon's rise to King of Thebes. What was his previous governmental role? Why do you think he was chosen as ruler? Since his bloodline isn't the same as Oedipus's, what must he do to prove that he is worthy of the throne? Did his diverse treatment of Eteocles's and Polynices's bodies have anything to do with feeling that he must prove his strength and worthiness? Why or why not?

Essay Topic 2

A strong and perhaps puzzling image used to close out the play is the three guards playing cards. On the surface, this seems an odd way to end the play, yet, on another level, it could be viewed as a way to sum up all of the play's dramatic events. Just about everyone in this play is gambling in one manner or another. Using this analogy, compare Creon's, Antigone's, and Haemon's actions in the play to a game of cards. Does the adage, "The house always wins" hold true in each of these characters' situations, or did one or more of them actually walk away a winner? Why?

Essay Topic 3

The Nurse represents Antigone's conscience. When Antigone sneaks back in after being out all night, the Nurse reminds Antigone of all she's done to raise her right. When Antigone jokes that she's been out with a secret lover, the Nurse tells Antigone that her mother would not be proud of her actions. Are there any other instances of the Nurse acting as Antigone's conscience? Why do you think the author chose to include this moment of childish teasing in an otherwise dark play? Why does the Nurse react so emotionally? What purpose does this scene serve in the overall plot of the play?

(see the answer keys)

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