A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful Test | Final Test - Easy

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 184 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Buy the A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful Lesson Plans
Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What are the three effects of words Burke identifies?
(a) Knowledge, desire, and response.
(b) Wishing, hoping, and praying.
(c) Image, motion, and thought.
(d) Sound, picture, and affection.

2. Which does Burke's definition of "grace" include?
(a) Speaking foreign languages.
(b) Painting and drawing.
(c) Conversation and debate.
(d) Posture and motion.

3. What type of poetry operates by imitation?
(a) Lyric poetry.
(b) Dramatic poetry.
(c) Elegiac poetry.
(d) Epic poetry.

4. How does Burke define "love?"
(a) As the natural state of human relationships with one another.
(b) As the boldest and most striking of all the passions.
(c) As the satisfaction the mind feels upon contemplating the beautiful.
(d) As the sexual attraction between sexes.

5. What does Burke expressly wish to discuss in this part of "A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful"?
(a) The connections between the thoughts in the mind and emotions produced in the body.
(b) The different cultural concepts of the beautiful in countries other than England.
(c) The usefulness of the sublime in formulating theories of art.
(d) The various manifestations of the sublime and the beautiful in early-modern England.

6. Burke writes that "Beauty in distress is the most _________ kind of beauty."
(a) Pleasurable.
(b) Confusing.
(c) Disgusting.
(d) Affecting.

7. What examples does Burke use to illustrate authority vs. affection?
(a) The rich and the poor.
(b) Dogs and cats.
(c) Fathers and mothers.
(d) Statesmen and artists.

8. To what does Burke compare human listening methods?
(a) Birds flying away at sudden noises.
(b) Fish darting through the water.
(c) Animals pricking up their ears.
(d) Children tossing and turning in sleep.

9. What is Locke's general theory of language, as related by Burke?
(a) Locke illustrates the superficiality of language, arguing that it is a specious method of communication.
(b) Locke opines that language stems from the animalistic desire of our brains to overcome adversity.
(c) Locke describes language as a cohesive system in which the meaning of words never varies from context to context.
(d) Locke argues that children are taught words before they are taught the actual meaning of words, which can confuse them.

10. What type of word are man, castle, horse, etc., as defined by Burke?
(a) Simple abstract words.
(b) Imagistic words.
(c) Compounded abstract words.
(d) Aggregate words.

11. What example does Burke cite in his discussion of how people may convey ideas of things which they do not know?
(a) A sickly child.
(b) A deaf musician.
(c) A crippled politician.
(d) A blind poet.

12. What does Burke consider darkness to be?
(a) Terrible in its own nature.
(b) Something with which all people are comfortable.
(c) The least imposing natural phenomenon.
(d) The highest level of the sublime.

13. How does Burke define "beauty?"
(a) As the ultimate object of human desires.
(b) As a necessary ingredient of the sublime.
(c) As a worthless obsession of a vapid society.
(d) As those qualities which inspire love or a similar passion.

14. What does Burke envision would be the result of fitness trumping beauty in the human species?
(a) The general intelligence quotient would rise dramatically.
(b) Individuals would find it difficult to get married and begin families.
(c) Men would be considered more beautiful than women.
(d) All people would be healthy, regardless of their looks.

15. Which kinds of words do not produce mental images, according to Burke?
(a) Compounded abstract words.
(b) Aggregate words.
(c) Foreign words.
(d) Simple abstract words.

Short Answer Questions

1. What, according to Burke, must be utilized regularly lest it/they fall into disrepair?

2. What recognizable figure does Burke term a "forced analogy?"

3. Why does Burke include a section on the effect of words in "A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful"?

4. What is Burke's argument about the relation of danger to the sublime?

5. Upon what does the power of poetry NOT depend, according to Burke?

(see the answer keys)

This section contains 761 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful Lesson Plans
Copyrights
BookRags
A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful from BookRags. (c)2018 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook