Roaring 20s Research Article from History Firsthand

This Study Guide consists of approximately 199 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Roaring 20s.
This section contains 507 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Roaring 20s Encyclopedia Article

More and more Americans were driving, and some of them caused deadly accidents while drunk. For this and many other publicized reasons, the U.S. Congress, under pressure from an influential temperance movement and other conservative interests, passed the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution in 1919, which states: "No person . . . shall manufacture, sell, barter, transport, import, export, deliver, furnish, or possess any intoxicating liquor."

The amendment, known as Prohibition, or the Volstead Act after the Minnesota senator who sponsored it, was doomed from the start. Almost as soon as the law went into effect on January 16, 1920, thousands of people set out to thwart it.

America's wide-open borders were a liquor smuggler's paradise. As Jules Abels explains in In the Time of Silent Cal:

There were 18,700 miles of land and sea to patrol, a hopeless task. Ships loaded with liquor left Vancouver in Canada charted for Mexico and returned empty...

(read more)

This section contains 507 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Roaring 20s Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Greenhaven
Roaring 20s from Greenhaven. ©2001-2006 by Greenhaven Press, Inc., an imprint of The Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook