Forgot your password?  

Study & Research Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Social Class and Economy

This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E..
This section contains 1,332 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Social Class and Economy Encyclopedia Article

Property and Society. There is no native Mesopotamian term for the concept of property. In the written documentation, fields, orchards, animals, houses, furniture, and slaves are identified by terms such as the "field of Gimillu, the divination priest," or the "ox of Enlil-bani, the metalsmith." No written treatise on the concept of property— whether private, communal, or state—has ever been discovered, and given the Mesopotamian disinclination to commit abstractions to writing, none is likely to be found. The majority of legal documents from Mesopotamia, however, are overwhelmingly concerned with the proper disposition of what modern people would call property, and thousands of written cuneiform tablets refer to customs— some of which may well predate the invention of writing and written texts—for ensuring legal, unchallengeable, and fair treatment of individuals with property claims. Concern with...

(read more)

This section contains 1,332 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Social Class and Economy Encyclopedia Article
Follow Us on Facebook