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Study & Research Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends

This Study Guide consists of approximately 41 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E..
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Patriarchy. Documents from as early as circa 2100 B.C.E. indicate that the Mesopotamian family was patriarchal; that is, the father was head of the family for his entire life, and descent was traced from fathers through sons. The father's importance is shown in the Laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi (circa 1792 - circa 1750 B.C.E.): "If a son hits his father, they shall cut off his hand." Referred to as a "house," the family was nuclear, not extended; that is, the family unit included only a man, his wife, and their children. Grandparents, as well as adult brothers and sisters and their offspring, had their own family units. The husband was expected to "build a house." Each family worshiped one particular god, a personal deity who intervened on the family's behalf with the major gods.

Children. Sons and...

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This section contains 628 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends Encyclopedia Article
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