Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends Research Article from World Eras

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The story of the birth of king Sargon of Akkad (circa 2334 - circa 2279 B.C.E.) has been called his autobiography or his legend. He was the illegitimate son of a priestess who was not permitted to have children. His name—which means "the king is legitimate"—suggests, in fact, that he was a usurper. He achieved his status because the goddess Ishtar fell in love with him. Bearing similarities with the biblical story of Moses in chapter 2 of Exodus, the Birth Legend of Sargon is known from fragments of Neo-Assyrian and Neo- Babylonian copies dating to the first millennium B.C.E. and found respectively at Nineveh and Dilbat.

I am Sargon, the mighty king, king of Akkad,
My mother was a priestess. I did not know my father.
My uncles lived in the hills.
My city is Azupirnu, which is on...


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This section contains 1,425 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends Encyclopedia Article
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World Eras
Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends from World Eras. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.