Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Family and Social Trends Research Article from World Eras

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The Position of Women. In a hymn to the goddess Gula (the patron of doctors and healing), the stages of a woman's life were described as follows: "I am a daughter, I am a bride, I am a spouse, I am a housekeeper." Once she was married, a woman's most important role was to bear children, especially sons. A tablet of Middle Assyrian Laws (circa 1400 - circa 1050 B.C.E.) has fifty-nine clauses relating to women.

Women in the Third Millennium B.C.E. Mesopotamian women were never equal to men before the law. The position of women in the early Sumerian city-state was higher than in later periods, perhaps because goddesses were important in Sumerian religion. Later, during the reign of king Sargon (circa 2334 - circa 2279 B.C.E.), the Akkadians continued Sumerian religious observances. Sargon appointed his daughter...

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This section contains 875 words
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